SailNet Community banner
21 - 30 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Thanks for the great recommendations, I just downloaded a copy of "The Dinghy Cruising Companion" on my tablet and I am on page 10 just from reading it during breakfast! Lol! Hard to put down as Roger has a nice descriptive way of writing that draws me in. I also found him on Youtube and subscribed. It's getting late so I better get out there and catch some fish! (From the shore unfortunately :() I will be looking for the other book once I'm done this one. I didn't see it on the same site I grabbed this one from so might have to look around a bit but sure I'll come across it somewhere. Later!
 

·
Registered
1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
Joined
·
583 Posts
Looks like you are on your way to success (y)
It seems I always enjoyed more the looking for a boat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Yes, It is fun looking at all the options out there. :) Read some more of the book yesterday between the minnows I kept catching! Lol! (I did end up with a couple keepers) and really enjoying it.
One thing brought up was that the author preferred completely open dinghies rather than the ones with covered front deck. He said it was easier getting the jib down when bad weather was approaching. Does anyone have advice on how much of an issue this would be for a newer sailor? A couple of the boats I am seriously looking at do have the covered front deck area. I had a covered deck on my old fishing boat and used underneath for storage, but never really had a reason to go out on it during bad weather. HAGO!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
5,106 Posts
There are pro's and cons to totally open boats. A dinghy with a foredeck has dry storage and may need less bailing because you are not taking as many waves over the bow.

There are a couple of work arounds to getting the jib down on open water on a decked dinghy or beach cat.

The simplest and most cost effective is a jib down haul. It's a rope tied to the head of the sail, runs down the forestay to a turning block then back to the cockpit. This allows for easy jib dowsing from the cockpit. I have this system on 2 of my boats.

Roller furling is more expensive, but a bit tidier. This is the same system as used for roller furling genoas on large sailboats but smaller. They can be purchased on line.

Cat rig. These are boats that are designed to sail pretty well without a jib. The main is bigger and placed further forward. My other 3 boats use this system.
 

·
Registered
1987 Cape Dory MKII hull #3
Joined
·
583 Posts
as described, a jib down haul works very well, is rapid, simple to operate and will give you the peace of mind you want, with the caveat of been just my humble opinion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Thanks guys! :) Knew there had to be a solution to that one, but being new to the sailing terminology I wouldn't have had any idea what to even try to search for on Google! o_O Lol! This Forum has been more helpful than I ever imagined it would! ;) HAGO!
 
21 - 30 of 30 Posts
Top