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I wouldn't have characterized the Catalina 22 and 25 as "ocean worthy", but if you mean to sail in the Chesapeake, then by all means, those are great choices. I would add the Oday 22, 23 and 25 to your list of boats too. I think they match up very well in terms of price and quality to the Catalinas; in fact, IMHO they surpass the Catalinas in terms of a couple of important features.

I like the Oday centerboard/keel set up better than the Catalina. On the Odays, the ballast is in a stub keel; it never moves and is safely encapsulated. The centerboard is a mostly unweighted fin that is controlled by a single line in the cockpit. This is a very simple set up that is easy to maintain. It is also easy to know the position of the centerboard; you always know if the board is up or down just by looking at the amount of pendent line in the cockpit. On the Catalinas, the centerboard contains the boat's ballast. The board is obviously very heavy and must be controlled with a ratcheted winch device. The winch is pretty robust, but these things can and do break, and they require maintenance. And you can't know if the board is up or down unless you fully crank the board up or down and adjust it from there.

One more key advantage of the Odays: the head is behind a bulkhead with a door. In the C22, the head is in the open cabin (there might be a curtain at best). I cannot begin to tell you the importance of a private head to the ladies while sailing.

And even though I'm partial to the Odays (I own an Oday 23 now, and once owned a C22), I'd go with whatever boat is in the best shape. Even though 8 large will buy you a nice example of any of these boats, you want to find a boat with a solid deck, good sails and a working outboard engine. Fixing or replacing any of those items will set you back a large chunk of the purchase price. Good luck.
 
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