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I am curious i there are any concerns with using the below technique to gybe, especially in high winds.

1. Sheet way in on a run(almost with the boom to the center of the boat)
2. Pass through the wind to gybe.
3. Sheet out to proper trim for a run.

Other than losing speed(I am not a racer) are there any concerns or problems with this technique?

Thanks !!!!
 

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Yep it's a Chicken Jibe. And in really high winds is the by far the safest way to jibe. Head up into the wind, through irons, and continue on to your desired heading. If you boat already has trouble tacking you will have to perform this fairly quickly.
 

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I am curious i there are any concerns with using the below technique to gybe, especially in high winds.

1. Sheet way in on a run(almost with the boom to the center of the boat)
2. Pass through the wind to gybe.
3. Sheet out to proper trim for a run.

Other than losing speed(I am not a racer) are there any concerns or problems with this technique?
That is called a safety jibe and as the name implies, it is the safest way to do it.
 

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That is called a safety jibe and as the name implies, it is the safest way to do it.
..although, depending on the boat and the sea (wave) conditions, it isn't always possible and in the REALLY nasty stuff might even be more dangerous to crew, sails and gear. It's called a Chicken Jibe because there's nothing "safety" about being head-to-wind with sails flogging, whilst successive waves sweep the decks clear of everyone and everything... ;)

FWIW, I sheet hard in.. and keep going.
 

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I am curious i there are any concerns with using the below technique to gybe, especially in high winds.

1. Sheet way in on a run(almost with the boom to the center of the boat)
2. Pass through the wind to gybe.
3. Sheet out to proper trim for a run.

Other than losing speed(I am not a racer) are there any concerns or problems with this technique?

Thanks !!!!
We were just taught this way in our 101 course. I didn't think there was any other way to gybe, except to tack instead. Is there? Everything was slow and controlled on this gybe.
 

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It can sometimes get a bit more complicated in large seas, and sheeting in tight isn't always the best option. When the seas are running large enough, you'll likely want to jibe down in the troughs, where the wind can be significantly lighter...

However, after completing a jibe with the main sheeted in tight, if it's not eased immediately, you can quickly find yourself reaching off somewhat out of control, on the face of the next overtaking wave, and risking a broach, or worse...

So, sometimes in larger seas, it might be a bit safer to maintain a heading deeper downwind immediately before, and after, the jibe...

In such situations, a boom brake can be worth its weight in gold...

Most times in such conditions, however, a Chicken Jibe will be the preferred way to go... Check for lines in the water beforehand, because on many cruising boats, you're gonna have to use the engine to bring the boat back around thru the wind... :)

If you're singlehanding a boat with wheel steering, and the traveler is forward of the companionway and the sheet led to winches forward in the cockpit, beyond the reach of the helmsman, a Chicken Jibe is pretty much your only option...

Have I mentioned how much I HATE that sort of arrangement? :)
 

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As one of the many recommendations or requirements for the Newport Bermuda race is to have a preventer or boom brake in place and because preventers scare me, we installed a Wichard boom brake about 6 years ago. I can not speak highly enough about this device! With it installed a gybe is child's play. Simply turn the boat and watch the boom cross the deck in a very soft controlled "thump". You can adjust it for more tension if wind velocity rises and it simply does its thing....
We would not leave the dock without it...
Bruce
 

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I am curious i there are any concerns with using the below technique to gybe, especially in high winds.

1. Sheet way in on a run(almost with the boom to the center of the boat)
2. Pass through the wind to gybe.
3. Sheet out to proper trim for a run.

Other than losing speed(I am not a racer) are there any concerns or problems with this technique?

Thanks !!!!
I'll add that if I'm singlehanded or with inexperienced crew, I will furl the jib first. This allows me to focus on the main, namely letting the main out and set as soon as I've jibed.

Obviously not a race technique, and maybe even a bit of "chicken" in this maneuver too :).
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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I'll add that if I'm singlehanded or with inexperienced crew, I will furl the jib first. This allows me to focus on the main, namely letting the main out and set as soon as I've jibed.

Obviously not a race technique, and maybe even a bit of "chicken" in this maneuver too :).
Dunno about your boat, but on some of the lightweight flyers I've sailed on that would be a really BAAAD idea!

Furling the jib on such causes:
1. Increased weather-helm, followed by
2. Rudder stall, followed by
3. BROACH!! :)

FWIW, this is what happened to a Couta-boat in our fleet a year or so back. They sank.

When heading down-wind, as Out points out, it's safer, generally, to douse the main somehow/anyhow than furl the jib.
 

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We don't have strong winds here but if we did...

- In waves time the gybe as the boat is surfing to reduce apparent wind
- Turning through an S - turning back as the main comes across the boat - can reduce the force on the sail
- thirding the motion to let the crap out of the mainsail as fast as possible after the gybe to avoid a round up
 

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Here's why, in the right circumstances, I'm a big fan of the chicken-jibe:

About four decades ago, when the Marblehead Town Class (the "Townies") were a very competitive fleet of about 70, I found myself on one Race Week race, rounding the windward mark and bearing off to the reach mark with about an 8-boatlength lead, and a squall coming up behind us, which hit just before the reach (jibe) mark.

the Townies don't have a backstay due to the long boom, just "lowers" slightly aft of the mast, which is canted way forward to boot:

https://www.google.com/search?q=mar...ead-NOOD%2FTown-Class-Marblehead-NOOD;800;534

The closer to the mark I got, the more chicken I became, so windy I couldn't even trim the main in for the gybe at all. So, with great reluctance ("damn it, I'm not giving up the lead!! Okay, well maybe I am"), I sailed past the mark a couple of length, jammed the tiller over alee, and took the "long way around".

It seemed to take forever, while the second boat was barrelling down on the mark, I was just ahead of him and was barely able to bear off fast enough post-tack (jibe, ha ha) to miss the mark and the second boat, which boat, a game competitor with many years in the class.....

Jibed and broke his mast in two places.

After which, everyone else chicken-jibed, which can be a hornet's nest in a crowd, but by then I was roaring off on a "just hang on" near-dead run. I wanted to wing the small jib out, but didn't dare send my crew forward for fear of diggin the bow in and broaching.

The squall let up, and I hung on to win. And got a few quiet "man, am I glad you jibed" thanks at the party that evening.

I teach sometimes, so now you've heard the story I sometimes tell my students when it's blowing out..
 

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Yes.. well, as you say, in the right circumstances and on certain boats..

It's a really tricky call for the newbie, because gybing safely in the trough takes skill, courage (confidence) and a good deal of luck (timing) but is certainly the only way to do it on a go-fast racing boat with expensive laminate sails which would be destroyed in seconds by a chicken gybe.

Perhaps the newbie, in their non-racing, very cruising, boat with Dacron sails and an even greener crew is best advised to chicken gybe.. at least until they get some confidence in their boat and their own ability. :rolleyes:
 

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That's the way I do it too, and it's not that slow when the helmsman works with the mainsail trimmer. I learned that the hard way only dad's Cat30 off Montauk back in '78. We did an accidental gybe and blew the gooseneck apart and tore the mainsail luff 4'. I learned to sew that day.
 

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Y... but is certainly the only way to do it on a go-fast racing boat with expensive laminate sails which would be destroyed in seconds by a chicken gybe.
I don't have a "go-fast racing boat with expensive laminate sails", but I am frankly surprised to learn that you can't tack them without destroying your sails. If that were true, how would they go upwind?
 
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