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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking forward to buying a sailboat, my first. I have little experience but have much researched, including Sailnet (thank you). The general reputation is that Hinckley is the best. If I can get my sailing kitty to accept the extra cost, would it be worth it?
 

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I am looking forward to buying a sailboat, my first. I have little experience but have much researched, including Sailnet (thank you). The general reputation is that Hinckley is the best. If I can get my sailing kitty to accept the extra cost, would it be worth it?
If money is no object to you, yes, Hinckleys are fine boats and could be expected to hold their value well, as long as you have them professionally maintained.

The question is, is it the right boat for you and the sailing you will do? If it isn't, you'll sell it, immediately losing 10% for the broker's commission, plus the sales tax paid when you bought the boat, and the cost of the professional upkeep one needs to keep from losing too much value.

If you're looking at a $300,000 boat, that means the ownership experiment will cost you $50,000 minimum.

It might be more economical in the long run to start sailing on something much more modest (it'll be more fun, too), make you're mistakes on a small boat that costs less to repair, and figure out exactly what you like and don't like on a boat. A Hinckley may be the answer at that point, or something else might be better for you.

Good luck,

Tim
 

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I agree with Tim. If you are new to sailing, the Hinckley probably isn't the best choice for learning. You should expect a few hard knocks along the way. Hinckley's are premium boats and it would be a shame -- not to mention bad for it's value -- to inflict the sort of abuse on one that a beginner inevitably doles out.

Where will you be sailing and what are your plans for how you'll use the boat?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tx Gramp 34, JohnRPollard and speciald for your info. My concern about a starter level is that if indeed I do sail at the serious level, I will have a material transition cost. But you do remind me that such may be a wise investment should I not actually become a serious sailor. I would like to keep ocean crossing as an option. I have RVd full time for 3 years, traveled many times all across North America and seem to have the wanderlust. My other inclinations are the Cabo Rico 38 or Caliber 40, the latter for the reduced maintenance. These two seem sound, but half the Hinckley cost, which is why I wonder how Hinckley can really be worth the extra money.
 

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Clearly, Hinckley is among the legends of boating - but not a "starter boat" Don't get me wrong, I love Hinckleys - back in the early '60's I sailed aboard Lola, my dad's Hinckley B40, we ventured far and wide and stumbled deep into the abyss on more than one occassion. But for a beginner - start small, start now!! If you want a boat you can't screw up too badly while learning everything the hard way, get an old Columbia, Cape Dory, Bristol, Alberg or the like in the 30-35 foot range they are sturdy boats and already have docking scars, knicks in the bow from running into the dock and they don't mind when you run aground from time to time. If you plan to venture into the blue, they will take you as safely and much more cheaply than the venerable Hinckley - plus you may come to grips with the fact that there a lot of great sailboats out there that you can fall in love with that cost a heck of a lot less.
Then, when you get good, buy a Hinckley as the boat you keep the rest of your sailing years.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
wwilson I cannot add to petmac. For what is called a bluewater boat, design, solid construction, Hinckley is well spoken of. johnshasteen seems to endorse the reputation. But are Cabo Rico, Caliber and Shannon at half the price only half the boat?
 

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If you can swing a Hickley 42 on a first boat, I would go for it. It's certainly fast enough, solid enough and I am sure you can compare it to all those other condo's below to understand the value you may be getting. I'll bet even Hickley's can be bought reasonably now in this economy. I bought my boat in 1984 and still really like it alot. (not a Hickley, but an S&S 37 whose quality has stood the times).

Moe


Enjoy yourself.

Moe
 

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My other inclinations are the Cabo Rico 38 or Caliber 40, the latter for the reduced maintenance. These two seem sound, but half the Hinckley cost, which is why I wonder how Hinckley can really be worth the extra money.
A Rolls-Royce costs a lot more than a Ford Crown Victoria. Both carry the same number of passengers, have similar performance (the Ford, at least, with the police interceptor engine), and are about equally reliable.

How can the Rolls be worth the extra money? Same idea as why a Hinckley is worth more than a production cruiser. Hinckleys are one-off, with hand-built interiors to the buyer's specification, finished to the highest standards. That costs money and is reflected in the price.

Whether or not those kind of differences are valuable to you is a personal decision. If you're looking for seaworthiness, seakindliness, ease of handling, etc., for ocean crossings, the differences between the boats you listed aren't a function of price. Bob Perry offers a consultation service in which he'll provide advice as a naval architect (Disclamer: no affiliation, etc.). This might help provide some objective data to sort out the differences between boats with respect to your needs.

Good luck,

Tim
 

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I think the OP should go for the Hinkley 42. Why stop there, go bigger and fancier. So you bounce off the docks a bit or run aground a few times learning. So what, it's only money. First class yards can fix it like new.

Of course, all this assumes that the OP really has that kind of money.

And all that nonsense about learning...don't worry about it. Learn as you go. Your paid captain can teach you all you need to know. Just a bit more money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Tx Gramp34 for your feedback. As a car lover I know why the Ford costs less than the Rolls. It is those particulars I seek in regards the Hinckley. Is the fiberglass of better quality. Is the hull better attached to the deck. Is the mast better secured. Is the hull more water resistant. As far as design, the hull entry and proportions to the Shannon, CR and Caliber seem similar. I think I will take your advice re Bob Perry. Tx again. NCC320- why the sarcasm? I sincerely wish to learn.
 

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Late to the party. I actually own a Hinckley SW-42, which I cruise for 2+ months each season. A few points:

Yes, the hull is actually attached to the boat better than others. Any others. There is no other manufacturer I am aware of which does a similar hull to deck joint. In terms of overall construction quality, there are a few which deserve to be mentioned in the same breath - Lyman-Morse, Morris, Pacific Seacraft, etc., but only a few. Sure, glass is glass, but Hinckley has traditionally used the most expensive resins and cloths, and their glass work is superior. If you don't believe, come crawl through the unfinished spaces of my boat and see for yourself. The interior fit and finish is lovely.

The SW-42 sails beautifully. She is faster than you think, but not a race boat. She has no bad habits, and balances beautifully. I go offshore with my wife and young son on a regular basis. She is old-school, with proper sea-berths with lee-cloths. She does not pound, and has a comfortable motion. She does not get stuffy at anchor, thanks to the large dorades. She is well ventilated. Every bunk has proper reading lights, the galley is wonderful at anchor or offshore.

She sails well and points well upwind, and does not overpower easily. The cockpit is large and comfortable. She is an excellent boat for daysailing, weekending, or extended cruising, but is also a safe, solid offshore boat.

Does it sound like I love my boat? It should, and I do. I never look at another boat with envy. She looks the way I think a boat should look, sails the way I think a boat should sail, and is built the way I think a boat should be built. I have never regretted for a moment spending the extra money to own this boat.

She does have one, significant drawback: She is expensive. Otherwise, everyone would own one. The varnish bills are not insignificant, put most of the boats come with covers for the major brightwork pieces, so 1-2 coats per year keeps the boat looking spectacular. She is my personal harbor beautification project.

That said, she is a family cruiser, not a museum piece. We were aboard for 8 weeks this summer with no gear or mechanical failures. The deck hardware is oversized, everything is rock solid and properly done. The installations are well done. My water tanks are 316L stainless, my fuel tank is Monel. You simply wouldn't believe the engine bed. I'm an engineer, and I appreciate things done right.

At $300K for a well maintained used boat, I think these are a pretty good deal, if you can stomach the ongoing maintenance.A new one would cost around $1 million, and would be the same hull. $300K is less than a Morris M36, and less than many new boats which are far less well made and less capable.

Remember, these are all custom boats, no two are the same. Make sure you like the layout of the one you're looking at. For the most part, owners take very good care of these boats. Any deficiencies in maintenance detract significantly from value, and should show up in a good survey.

If you want more info, or insight in specific aspects of the boat, send me a private message. I just finished 8 weeks aboard, and will be coming back to New England next week to sail her back to Maine for winter storage.



 
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