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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I am guessing nearly all of us have owned, do own, or want to own a sailboat of some sort and size. Some of us own(ed) more than one. Most of us have probably sailed on more than one type of boat.

So with all of the caveats, knowing what you now know about your current boat and it's problems, headaches, sailing qualities, etc., compared to all the ones that you have sailed on before, would you buy your current boat again?

I'll start. I own a 1979 Pearson 10M Tall Rig. It's my first "real" boat. As with many folks here, I am always looking to see if I can get a better boat than I own. After all the looking, I can't really seem to find a better boat for my needs than what I own. It's fast (PHRF 135), easy to single hand, roomy below (11 ft beam), decent sized cockpit, well built, sails up wind well and is forgiving. Every time I look to "upgrade", I can't find one, in a 33-36 ish ft size, that can do all the things that my current boat does for the $ I paid (under $800/ft). I basically put it in the water and sailed it a way. The only thing that I had to do was recaulk a window.

Does it have it's "problems". Sure, the bilge is shallow, not a lot of storage, not a lot of real wood below, there is no anchor locker, my anti-skid is starting to go and my 135 Genoa is blown out.

If I "Upgraded" I wouldn't need anything more than 36 feet, but I want Performance (Very good PHRF), quality, nice creature comforts, and easy to single hand. Still haven't found one that meets my needs that is well priced. I have sailed on J-boats (J-105 and J109), O'Day 34, Catalina 22, IMX-40, Hunter 40, Sabre 402, etc. and each has a quirk that I don't like that would make it a high on my list of next boats.

So now that you know the "issues", would you buy your current boat again? For those that "upgraded" any regrets?

DrB
 

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Great thread-starter, DrB. I have owned my Catalina 22 for 11 years. It's a 1983 model. A great starter boat, and because of its simplicity, it's easy to justify going out, even for just a few hours. Hence, I have logged more time on the water than many in my marina who sail larger boats.

Naturally, I'm always looking around for the next boat. It will probably be something in the 30-34 foot range, with the ability to accommodate me living aboard and cruising the waters of North America and the Caribbean.

Would I buy the C22 again? Yes. In a New York minute!! Not only is is fairly economical to operate, it is a very forgiving boat, great for learning on, kids love it, and it is surprisingly seaworthy when the wind pipes up and she's sailing on her ear.:eek: I can safely and easily singlehand this boat in conditions that have long since forced the MacGregors off the water.:D Also, since her systems are simple, repairs and upgrades are also fairly simple. You can't get into too much trouble experimenting on this boat, and there are so many sailors out there with small boat experience and such a strong C22 users community, help with a sticky problem is never very far away.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Catalina 22

I think that Catalina 22 is a great boat. I liked sailing on my dad's. It's a cozy weekend boat that you can do an overnight in it, just bring a porta-pot, or have marina facilities, and a camp stove. Easy to set-up, easy to learn on, decent sailing performance, a small cabin, trailerable, good sized cockpit for day sailing with friends, and inexpensive.

There is a reason that the Cat 22 is if not the, one of the most sold boats ever made. It appeals to a wide variety of sailors. Catalina has sold more 22's than some other boat manufacturers have sold for their entire boat line.

DrB
 

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I've owned my Pearson 26 for 6+ yrs., bought from my friend whose family owned it for 20 or so.

Though I would like some more room inside (it's boat camping, basically), on the whole it is perfect for me to single hand often, simple to maintain (for a boat, LOL), great performance/comfort ratio, and it was/is in excellent condition for its age.

And at about $150/ft. the price was right even after I put new standing rigging, furler, bimini, etc., on it.

On the whole, yes, I made the right choice.
 

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Francophobe
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Flying Scot

My boat is just about perfect for me. Large enough to fit the family and a couple of guests. Easy to tow. Little wood - low maintenance. No motor. Good combination of fast but stable (for a CB dinghy). We have seats to sit on and a wide side deck for when we need to hike. The boom is high enough that it is easy to duck under.

Yes, the Thistle is faster but talk to them after a race about how their posteriors are feeling and you will see the genius in a Flying Scot.

Another plus is a great group of sailors. I am impressed with how friendly and 'Corinthian' a group they are. While maintaining the competitive spirit they keep things light and low stress.

Are there things I would change - of course. For the kids a cabin with potty might be nice. I would prefer a spin launch tube vs launching off the side. Hiking straps would be a nice addition. The halyard winches need some getting used to.

One other nice bonus is the builder is still building them and they are happy to support owners of older hulls with tips and spare parts.

No boat is perfect but for where I am right now the Flying Scot is great.
 

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Irrationally Exuberant
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We've had our 1987 Pearson 28-2 for a year and a half now, and I would definitely buy it again. It is just the right size for our first boat, moves well in the frequently light wind on the Chesapeake, has a nice interior, perfect layout for us, wasn't too beat by previous owners. Has provided lots and lots of projects for me :) while still being sailable.

I could possibly see going with a bigger boat someday, something with a slightly more luxurious interior, but when I look around online (and who doesn't?) just for fun, I still come back to our boat as being my first choice.
 

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So I am guessing nearly all of us have owned, do own, or want to own a sailboat of some sort and size. Some of us own(ed) more than one. Most of us have probably sailed on more than one type of boat.

So with all of the caveats, knowing what you now know about your current boat and it's problems, headaches, sailing qualities, etc., compared to all the ones that you have sailed on before, would you buy your current boat again?

I'll start. I own a 1979 Pearson 10M Tall Rig. It's my first "real" boat. As with many folks here, I am always looking to see if I can get a better boat than I own. After all the looking, I can't really seem to find a better boat for my needs than what I own. It's fast (PHRF 135), easy to single hand, roomy below (11 ft beam), decent sized cockpit, well built, sails up wind well and is forgiving. Every time I look to "upgrade", I can't find one, in a 33-36 ish ft size, that can do all the things that my current boat does for the $ I paid (under $800/ft). I basically put it in the water and sailed it a way. The only thing that I had to do was recaulk a window.

Does it have it's "problems". Sure, the bilge is shallow, not a lot of storage, not a lot of real wood below, there is no anchor locker, my anti-skid is starting to go and my 135 Genoa is blown out.

If I "Upgraded" I wouldn't need anything more than 36 feet, but I want Performance (Very good PHRF), quality, nice creature comforts, and easy to single hand. Still haven't found one that meets my needs that is well priced. I have sailed on J-boats (J-105 and J109), O'Day 34, Catalina 22, IMX-40, Hunter 40, Sabre 402, etc. and each has a quirk that I don't like that would make it a high on my list of next boats.

So now that you know the "issues", would you buy your current boat again? For those that "upgraded" any regrets?

DrB
You have a great boat. Why not buy yourself a new sail or two and you may feel like you have a new boat?
 

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Catalina 250:



Good boat for what it is. I guess in 25', you cannot ask for a lot. It is fine for day sailing and weekending on nice weekends, but not much more. Of course, that was its design point. This is a good starter boat. Going back, knowing what I know now and then, I would have bought it again.

Catalina 320:



Fun boat. First boat with real boat systems for us. Very fun to sail and very forgiving. Will turn in its own wake. By the time we got this boat, we were seriously considering saving up to cruise. We bought this boat to learn the systems of a larger boat and some of the intracies of sailing a larger boat. It did give is that but at a price: we had to trade up to go cruising and live aboard. For that reason and that reason only, I would not have purchased this boat again. We should have done more research, chartered more or just made the plunge... but it was hard to do without having more solid sea time and more ownership time on a larger boat... but I still would not have purchsed it knowing what I know now. Again, the only reason I say NO is that it was not the right boat for what we thougth we wanted to do.

Catalina 380



This boat is actually a falloff from the old Morgan hulls. She is a heavy boat and probably overbuilt compared to most Catalinas. We knew after the 320 that we would want something that would be safe and take a beating, and we did not consider speed a factor to consider as we would just be cruising. As such, we bought the tall rig for light airs and decided we would just live with it slow qualities. That was a mistake. We have spent MANY hours getting tossed around in this baot that a better performing boat might have done beter with. The tall rig made the boat tender. In addition, tankage was a constant problem as she did not perform well in light air (which required motoring) but did not have a sufficient diesel supply for long distant motoring. As such, w spent may days bobbing along a lot slower than we might have otherwise.

The flip side of this argument was when she was ever caught in anything nasty. She was solid and would take to weather (or with it) much better than lighter boats and other larger boats. The interior arrangements of this boat make it a very, very, very good live aboard boat. The cockpit arrngements makes it awesome for entertaining or just laying out at anchor.

This boat is the right boat for many people and I have repeatedly suggested it for those people. I actually believe that with modifications to fuel, cabinetry, and tankage, this boat would go about anywhere. It will take quite a bit of modifications, but nothing that is too much of a killer. You do have to put up with its shortcomings, though - and there are several as mentioned above. For some, these shortcomings can be a deal breaker (especially those that like to race).

All in all, going back, I would not have purchased this boat again knowing what I know and how I would use the boat. I would have puchased a Nordhave 46, a Hylas 54, Mason 54, a Krogen 42, or possibly the boat we have now (a Catalina 400... will discuss more in a minute). My reasons are that where we lived at the time and our destiations gave the boat a number of shortcomings. The tenderness of the boat burned Kris (my wife out) and I got frustrated with how slow she was. If I could go back and did own the boat, I would have it re-rigged for a shorter mast, put on Harken Batt-Cars, altered the fuel, and made some other changes to make it a better boat for our use. Instead, we lived aboard and those changes were hard to do while living and cruising on the boat. Basically, we dealt with what we had and it made us frustrated at times.

In the end, we sold the boat to some people who fell in love with her and cruised all over the place in it. It was the right boat for them (no kids, incidentally).

Catalina 400:



About as soon as we sold our 380, we got serious in looking for another boat. We wanted something we could cruise on in safety, without having to worry about fuel or seas, and could live aboard with the kids in safety and comfort.

At the time, we were living in SW Florida. The water is very shallow there and the bridges are 55' - both of which are real negatives to our old 380 and about any other sailboat of any size. After quit a bit of boat shopping, we ended up trying to choose between a Nordhavn 46 and a Kadey-Krogen 42. We really like the larger sailboats, like the Mason 54 and Hylas 54, but the draft and height restrictions were a real concern.

We repeatedly tried to buy various boats of both. It was one unforgettable nightmare after another. We actually lost a bid, for asking price, no negotiations, OVER ONE HOUR! Yes, that is the truth. Ugh. The rest of the stories are no less frustrating. It turned out that we bought a place back in Texas and we ended up sharing our frustrations with a dealer that we had bought our boats from. She had a Catalina 400 in her parking lot. SHe offered for us to come by and see it. We hesitated, then accepted. In the end, we bought it.

The 400 is probably one of the best sailing boats I have sailed on. SHe is sure footed, fast, and predictable. She is very roomy and comfortable. There are 400's everywhere, adn although it is not one of the best selling of the Catalina line, she is still one of the best in my opinion.

My negatives of the boat are cabinet space/storage, some systems access, I hate the two heads (my wife loves it, incidentally), and fuel tankage. Not sure I can come up with many others.

Going back I think I would still have purchased it... I think. I still really like the Nordhavn 46, but it did not seem meant to be. The 46 probably could not have been shipped to Texoma, so it would have caused other logisticial problems that might have forced me to sell my place here and relocate back to FL sooner than we wanted. However, the N46 is a go-anywhere boat (and I mean about anywhere) in comfort and safety with little to no modifications, has a relatively shallow draft compared to a sailboat, has a 26' bridge restriction, and other things that would have made it an easier boat for us and MAYBE better.

I will say this for anyone that might accuse me of drifting to the dark side: our Catalina 400 is much more than we thought it would be. It has made my wife fall in love with sailing again - and we both enjoy just sitting back and letter her glide through the water. The kids love it and we are all comfortable on her whether at dock, sail, or anchor. It has held its value much better than what I understand the N46's have (which says a lot). Most of all, we enjoy the boat and enjoy being back sailing. I would reccomend this boat, without reservation, to most people depending on their intended use and location.



- CD
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Great Post/Story CD.....

I really admire folks that aren't afraid to say, hey I spent a ton of money, got into it an realized the ITEM/EXPERIENCE wasn't what I hoped, expected or thought it was and wouldn't do it again.

I use to race bikes (human powered) and guys (and gals) would spend oddles of dough on a high-zoot frame, get it custom-made, fitted, and such, and then always say it was well worth the money, best bike they had ever owned, when most of them could have probably bought a stock frame and just got it fitted correctly and had the same experience for the type of recreational riding/racing they did. They were embarrassed to say, it wasn't worth the money. Not so for me.

I raced an older, heavier steel lugged frame that was made by a reptuable dealer after graduating from Grad School. As I got better, and the technology in frame building advanced, I convinced myself I would do better if I had a lighter, more responsive frame. I did need one that was custom made because of my large size. I went with this high-zoot Titanium frame, filled out my personal questionnaire, got measured, plunked down my $2700 and the frame arrived another 4 weeks later. Another $1800 in parts, and the new stead was ready. It was a mistake looking back. I told the frame company I wanted a stiff drivetrain, and they overbuilt it to a point of being uncomfortable in long rides. It tracked well, but at the end of the day, I went back to my "cheap" bike and only used the other bike when racing. When folks asked me about my "race" bike and would I do it again, I tell them for some folks it's worth it, for me it wasn't.

I bought a Japanese Pick-Up truck 7 years ago because I wanted a pick up and it was rated high by CR and Motor Trend, etc. It turned out to be a bad decision. The car has had problems and two weeks after I bought it, my wife tells me she doesn't like driving it because it's too big. I asked why she didn't say something during the test drive,. She replied that she thought I had my heart set on it and didn't want to spopil my excitement. Had she said something, I probably would not have bought it.

However, for my Pearson 10M, the more I sail on other's boats, the more I like ours.

DrB
 

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Grasshopper
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I pretty much like the boat we have for what we do, but if I had it to do over again I would have gotten a different partner. :p
 

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SailGunner
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We love our Hunter 30T and are on it almost every weekend here in Missouri. We recently purchased a Hunter 410 for when we retire (in 2-3 years) and have it in the canal behind our retirement house (currently rented) in Florida. We only purchased this boat now becasuse it was a great buy but I am still wondering why I have a 41' sailboat in Florida when I can't use it for another 2-3 years.
 

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I think that Catalina 22 is a great boat. I liked sailing on my dad's. It's a cozy weekend boat that you can do an overnight in it, just bring a porta-pot, or have marina facilities, and a camp stove. Easy to set-up, easy to learn on, decent sailing performance, a small cabin, trailerable, good sized cockpit for day sailing with friends, and inexpensive.

There is a reason that the Cat 22 is if not the, one of the most sold boats ever made. It appeals to a wide variety of sailors. Catalina has sold more 22's than some other boat manufacturers have sold for their entire boat line.

DrB
Couldn't have said it better myself, DrB. When my kids were still at home, I would go out for several days with one of them at a time for a special sailing holiday with Dad. I don't know if they enjoyed it, but I loved it. My youngest daughter and I went out one time when she was 8, and the motor died shortly after we left the slip.:( Turned out great as it was the first time I had to rely on the sails alone to anchor, weigh anchor and return to the slip. It was a memorable time for me and for her.:)
 

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Aeolus II
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I am on my 4th boat

I have been sailing for the last 35 years. I have owned a 14', a 21', a 22' and now (a few years ago) settled on a 27' Catalina. I mostly daysail and do an occasional weekend. Mostly with my wife and occasionally with friends. I think I have the perfect boat for me at this time.
 

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An Aussie Sailor
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I've owned my boat 3 yrs now. It's the first boat I've owned but I sailed quite often with mates on a few other boats of around the same size (26-30 ft).
Comparing to how the other boats sailed balanced with their other features (or lack thereof) I am still glad I have the boat I've got (Cole 26).
The more I keep researching the design and the designer the more I keep hearing the comment that they are good boats and a good design.
It's 26ft works well in the size of the bay I sail, it can comfortably accommodate 3 for overnighting or 4-5 for day trips.. Easily handled by a crew of two and with a little more tweaking single handed.
If I were to upgrade for the reason of size I would look very hard at other boats from the same designers board.

Mychael
 

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ex-Navy
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Yeah, I'd do it again

My boat is a semi-custom. The hull is one of 12 designed by Charlie Morgan and laid up between 1976 and 1979. The boats were finished at the Starrett & Jenks yard in Florida.
The hull is a throwback to the 40's or 50's -- long overhangs, a tapered bow and stern and narrow beam -- if you like that look ( and I do) it's a thing of beauty. She's 45 ft 10 inches on deck, 11 ft beam and 6ft 1 inch draft, dispalces 25000 lbs. As was pointed out in a comment about these boats, their finish depends very much on what then original owners wanted and were willing to spend. Enchantress' original owner and a subsequent owner made here a real class act. Real wood below, brass fittings ( a distinct mixed blessing) custom mattresses -- not cushions. The best insulated refrigerator I've ever seen on a boat, a very quiet Volvo turbo diesel. She's very comoftable below, has a huge cockpit and sails like magic.
Improvements by me, a Vacuflush head (this was a must do for my wife) new sink. rewired to code. New running rigging. Replaces the plumbing and sinks.
Drawbacks, well a 6-foot draft is not ideal for the Chesapeake. The sails are in reasonable shape but not great and I'd love a fully-battened main. Better rollerfurler and the primaries should be 2 sizes bigger to handle the #1 genoa (135%).
Enchantress is the 4th boat I've owned on the bay.
Previous boats were Fancy Free, a hard-chined Dickerson 32 -- 8 tons of mahogany and oak without a mean fastening in her entire hull. I named her first dinghy Footloose bad choice, very bad choice.
Second boat was Satisfaction, a C&C 40 fitted out for racing. Did the Annapolis Wednesday series for 18 years.
Third boat was New Day, a Tartan 37 keel-centerboard version. She was a really good boat but my wife was never comfortable on her.
Finally Enchantress.
Yeah, I'd do it all over again.
 
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