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Bluenoser
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192 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
The HMS Bounty is a tall ship that was built in Nova Scotia in 1961 for the MGM movie "Mutiny on the Bounty", starring Marlon Brando...she appears to be in trouble from Hurricane Sandy.

From ABC News:
2:55 AM EDT: Coast Guard spokesman David Weydert tells ABC News, “The Coast Guard received notification that the sailing vessel HMS Bounty was in distress. We responded by sending out a C-130 aircraft and we’re currently monitoring the situation.”

And the ships website confirms she is in harms way:
TallShipBounty.org

I sure hope this story has a happy ending.
 

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formerly posting as eryka
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1,123 Posts

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formerly posting as eryka
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1,123 Posts
They were on passage from Canada to Florida, and they had left Canada before Sandy was even a tic on NHC's radar. They detoured WELL east of the storm track, not right off Hatteras as the article makes it appear ... but this is a BIG storm.
 

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Chastened
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4,862 Posts
Crew is all safe and rescued. I feel that the skipper erred, and the ship will be lost. :(
 

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Bluenoser
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192 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Didn't the idots in charge monitor the weather for the past week? The owners should be billed for the rescue.
Many larger vessels (including navy ships, cruise ships) put to sea for hurricanes since they are more likely to be damaged or sunk in harbour. I suspect the HMS Bounty was somewhere in the projected landfall area of Sandy and was trying to get south to safer water...damned if you do and damned if you don't.

Latest from CBC says the crew has taken to the liferafts and USCG choppers are on the way. I sure hope they make it out OK.
 

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formerly posting as eryka
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Registered
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16,466 Posts
Didn't the idots in charge monitor the weather for the past week? The owners should be billed for the rescue.
I agree with that.

"She said her husband, Captain Robin Walbridge, was trying to get around Hurricane Sandy en route to Florida.

"He was just trying to avoid it, skirt it. Skirt through it, skirt around it," McCann said Monday."


Hurricane Sandy forces HMS Bounty evacuation - Nova Scotia - CBC News

Another one that was hoping weather stayed exactly has was forecast by the weather service without giving it a proper and big security margin.

regards

Paulo
 

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Bluenoser
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192 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hopefully they will all be rescued soon. Fortunately they are within helicopter range. Gotta admire those CG crews. No one is really "safe" until all are ashore, all accounted for. Waiting to hear that good news...
 

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Bluenoser
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192 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
From CBC News:
As of 8:20 a.m. AT, a U.S. Coast Guard Jayhawk helicopter had begun hoisting the crew members from the life-rafts.

Campbell said officials were still trying to determine exactly how many crew members were on board. The Coast Guard was originally told 17 people were on the Bounty but only 16 heat signatures were detected.
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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3,688 Posts
It doesn't seem like 18' seas should have been too much for a boat of that size. Sounds like she opened up some seams and pumps couldn't keep up with it. Will be interesting to hear what actually happened. There may be no fault other than inadequate pump capability or lack of bottom maintenance. Glad they're OK.
 

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formerly posting as eryka
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1,123 Posts
They had just come from weeks of maintenance in Canada. So boat should have been in good shape??? I'm also reading that they lost propulsion?
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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3,688 Posts
There's got to be a lot of lineal feet of seams on a boat like that. Once they start working and opening up, the bilge can fill up pretty quickly. I remember well how seemingly tight seams can open up in a pounding. Wonder if there were any manual pumps such as on the old square riggers? Of course the old ships had a lot more hands to man those pumps for hours on end. It really is a shame to lose one of these tall ships like this. They are magnificent.
 
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formerly posting as eryka
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1,123 Posts
Oops, correction, they had already left Canada, they were in New London, CT a few days ago. That totally made sense, then, given Sandy's predicted impacts in NY and New England, that they'd be safer at sea than in port. They ssailed out due east to get well clear of the storm before continuing south. The Navy sent all their vessels out from Norfolk in advance of the storm for the same reason - sometimes you're safer away from the dock!
 

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... That totally made sense, then, given Sandy's predicted impacts in NY and New England, that they'd be safer at sea than in port. They ssailed out due east to get well clear of the storm before continuing south. The Navy sent all their vessels out from Norfolk in advance of the storm for the same reason - sometimes you're safer away from the dock!
That can make sense on a ship that can stand storm conditions with ease. I don't think that will applies to an old remake of an historic boat.

Regards

Paulo
 

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Bluenoser
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192 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
"HMS Bounty now sunk according to US coast guard. 5 crew hoisted from life rafts so far. Lifts continue. #cbcns
by PhonseJessome via twitter on October-29-12 at 9:13:41 AM
 

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formerly posting as eryka
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1,123 Posts
Good Morning America just interviewed someone from Coast Guard, who said 10 feet of water on deck when they abandoned and ship is now sunk. They rescued 14 and 2 or 3 unaccounted for.

Ugh. Sux.
 

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261 Posts
You make the best decisions you can at the time and, sometimes, it just doesn't work out no matter what you do.

In '95 my ship (US Navy) was coming back from the Med. There was a big hurricane just leaving the African coast headed west, so we stayed in the Azores for a few days waiting for the storm to commit to a track so we'd know what to do. It appeared to be turning north early, so we proceeded west on our way toward Halifax to go around it. Lo and behold, storm #2 appears and takes a much more westerly track, then turns north toward the eastern seaboard. Great... back to the Azores for two more days.

Finally, because we are due home after 6 months at sea, we set out on a very odd southerly track to give ourselves lots of sea room to run. Hurray for us, storm #3 appears.

Sometimes, you just do what you have to do. We point for the weakest of the storms and hoped for the best. That storm becomes Hurricane Gordon and it's moving faster than we can run around it. We put on turns and buckled up. Talk about a ride, it was one of those storms where if you aren't on watch you are in your rack hanging on tight. If you are on watch, you lock down on a handhold and enjoy the ride. We were putting the front gun under water and alternately feeling the screws run free when the stern was lifted out of the water. This went on for a few days.

On that ship, an Aegis Cruiser, you can see down the main passageway for several hundred feet. What's freaky is looking down the passageway and watching the watertight door hatchways misalign in opposite directions, back and forth, as the ship is twisted and untwisted, then twisted the other way.

Now, imagine a bunch of calked wooden seams going through that. The poor souls on the Bounty replica were probably crapping square-edged bricks. Unlike Uncle Sam's Canoe Club, the guys on the Bounty replica are just working a job. They aren't indentured servants and they aren't fighting men freely willing to die for their shipmates as a matter of course. If it was me on the Bounty replica? "Man the lifeboats, mateys- we've done what we could within reason. This tub's going down and it's insured. **** happens. That's what insurance is for.

The point of my long, rambling post is this: The captain the Bounty replica made the decisions he made based on the information he had. Sometimes events conspire against our best laid plans and protocols. You do what you can, which is what he and the crew did. But at the end of the day, the old tub is a replica and a prop. It is a physical asset that is insured and nothing more. If your office building caught fire, would you be the daring guy on the hose trying desperately to save the desks and file cabinets when the roof collapses? Of course you wouldn't. Don't romanticize the Bounty replica because it's a pretty wooden boat. For anyone to die trying to ride out a storm would be the greatest act of moronic stupidity.
 
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