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I have a Honda 2.3 it idle good but if I give it gas it stall if I don’t choke it so I know it’s a fuel system problem but I’d like to know what the problem could be
 

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Yep, sounds like a Honda 2.3.

I have mine at the shop right now for a carb rebuild.

They are frustrating little engines.
 

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Ethanol is just a bet on the odds. Absorbs moisture, which corrodes the tiny jets.
 

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Ethanol is just a bet on the odds. Absorbs moisture, which corrodes the tiny jets.
I use only ethanol-free gas in all my small motors (outboards, lawn mowers, snow blowers) and in my antique cars that are driven infrequently, and never have carb problems.

This website will tell you if ethanol-free gas is available in your area. Pure-Gas.org : Map of Ethanol-Free Gas Stations
 

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If ethanol free gas was the only problem that would be great, but the 2.3 has a tiny interior tank that needs to be filled frequently. Filling the tank in the rain or sloppy conditions can also lead to water in the tank. It doesn't take much to throw these motors off.
 

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If ethanol free gas was the only problem that would be great, but the 2.3 has a tiny interior tank that needs to be filled frequently. Filling the tank in the rain or sloppy conditions can also lead to water in the tank. It doesn't take much to throw these motors off.
Well, yeah. You shouldn't introduce water into the fuel tank, but the most common cause of problems with small motors, by far, is storing the engine during the off-season with a residue of ethanol gas in it.

If ethanol-free gas is available at a gas station or marina in your area, using it will prevent most carb problems. If not, you can buy it at Loews by the quart for about $6.00. At the end of the season, empty the fuel tank, pour in a can, run it, and it'll replace the residual ethanol gas and protect your motor until spring.

Or you can pay the mechanic $300. to clean your carb. A friend learned that lesson the hard way.
 

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Well, yeah. You shouldn't introduce water into the fuel tank, but the most common cause of problems with small motors, by far, is storing the engine during the off-season with a residue of ethanol gas in it.
Lol. It's not introducing water to the fuel tank. If it takes two hours to cross a lake and you have 40 minutes of fuel, you are going to need to fuel up whether it's raining or not. That's just the reality of these small motors, they have additional failure modes relative to other propulsion systems. My boat is rated for 5 hp max, but there isn't the physical space available for a 4 stroke 5, my tiller hits the top of the 2.3 as it is.
20210502_120055.jpg
 

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I'm having great luck with mine, dingy use only, if I use 1 gallon a year it's a lot. Ethanol free fuel near me comes by the jug for $15/gallon. Worth it for my use case. Can see it would be a PIA if I needed to refuel underway Arch.
 

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For me the key to avoiding fouled carbs on small outboards is to get into the habit of shutting the fuel off and running it until the engine dies any time the engine isn't going to be used for more than a few days. You don't want fuel sitting in the float bowl for long periods: that is a recipe for trouble. Since I started doing that I have never had a fouled carb.

If you do have a fouled carb it is actually a really easy diy job to take it apart and clean it. They aren't very complicated, and it is a good skill to have if your engine gives you trouble when you are away from civilization.

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

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The more you run an outboard, the better it likes it too. If it’s going to site for weeks at a time, running it dry or even fogging it, is a pretty good idea.
 

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I use carburetor cleaner periodically to keep things clean.
With Suzuki 2.5 it’s first symptom is stalling at idle.
 

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We have the same outboard and it has been running like a champ for four years now. The only time we had the same issue you’re describing, it was because we unknowingly had a small leak in our jerry jug so there was water in the gas. We put in a new carb and all was well again. My money is on the carb being the issue.

We have ALWAYS used non-ethanol gas in it. Up in New England where we can’t buy it, we just pony up for the canisters of Tru Fuel. We don’t use enough gas over a season for the financial penalty to be too harsh.
 

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Ethanol is just a bet on the odds. Absorbs moisture, which corrodes the tiny jets.
Not exactly. Corrodes aluminum bowl, and the corrosion product foul the tiny jets. The depositis are nearly always aluminum hydroxide. This is also why carb cleaners alone don't work (the problem is not gum, which is what they disolve). Screw the jet out and clean it (very fine wire). Quite easy, not worth sending to the shop if you are at all handy.

Another cure is to use a gas additive that stops aluminum corrosion. Biobor EB, Stabil 360, Merc Stor-n-Start. Very effective.

And close the vent when not actually running. No water, no corrosion.
 

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Where are you in New England? It is available.

We’re based in Groton, CT - or we will be again when we finally get up there. We are currently just north of Belhaven, NC trying to move during slim opportunities between persistently difficult weather systems.

This is great! Thanks!
 

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Clean the pilot jet. If that doesn't do it, then adjust the idle mixture screw, if accessible. Sometimes you need to drill out a plug to get to the adjustment. This is an absolutely common issue on small outboards of all brands.
 

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I have one also. I bought it used and immediately replaced the carb as it was cheaper. I use regular gas. The carb bowl is not aluminum, it is steel which I paint each year on the exterior to hold down rust. The real key is this. After EACH use, before putting it away for a week, I drain the carb bowl via the small drain screw (carefull not to backout too far..only till it drips). I have done this now for 6 years since the carb replacement and had no carb issues.

Another issue with these engines are the valves sticking slightly open. Again each year in the spring I spray some gumout in the spark plug hole and rotate (not start) engine. I do this several times. You will see it come out the exhaust port a bit. I always use a valve tech lead substitute product in the gas can all summer. This provides extra lubrication for the valve stems. I am not sure they make it anymore, but there are others like Motor Medic Lead Substitute.

Result, my engine purrs at idle and accelerates smoothly.

Nick
 
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