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Daysailor wannabe cruiser
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey gang,

I've been running most of my stupid questions through here to get so perspective. I have another one.

There is a guy in my neighborhood that wants to trade a Honda 2000i generator for my mountain bike. The trade looks fair based on prices I've seen for the Hondas. I don't ride the bike anymore so I've been looking to get rid of it.

Anyhow I'd like to use the generator once in a blue moon on weekend trips to run an Home Depot AC unit in the hatch. I figure the generator and AC will add another 100 pounds to the boat when I have it in there. Is this a bad idea or a good idea?
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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The distribution of the weight could be a concern (all at one end of the boat while underweigh), but other than that it shouldn't be a problem.
 

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Master Rum Hider
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54 Posts
The biggest concern would be CO and CO<sub>2</sub>. So, if you do get the generator, it would be a good idea to get a CO detector alarm. And, keep it far away (preferably downwind).

Otherwise, it sounds quite comfy.
 

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Montgomery 17
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384 Posts
Sounds like a great trade, I dont know much about mountain bikes or how expensive yours is but I know the Honda 2k generators are expensive but are well worth the money.

I dont think the weight matters that much unless you are racing. If you plan on racing or outrunning your friends then you might take it out. Other than that just keep the wieght balanced on your boat and try to store it as low as possible.
 

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Telstar 28
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CO is the biggest danger of running a genny aboard a small boat. I hope you have a CO detector installed. IF not, get one.
 

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Daysailor wannabe cruiser
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142 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
CO detector

Thanks for the replies guys. I think I'll give it a go. Worst case I just have it for some back up power for hurricane season. The CO detector is a definite thing. Coastal/Bay sailing is supposed to be fun, not deadly.
 

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moderate?
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1,000 Posts
Lans...I think it is a great deal. Having a gen...means you can also add a house battery and keep it charged up so you can run other stuff on the boat as well as letting you use power tools & other AC devices to fix. Have fun!
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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1,000 Posts
Just got done running my little Yamaha ($700) to charge up my battery on my 21' Cal while at the mooring last weekend. I even kept it charging while I swung ship to adjust my new compass. The Honda 2000 is larger than mine but both are quiet and easy to use. Make sure that the gas cap and it's vent seal well. You'll want to actually close them and tip the gen-set over to verify this. Much better than finding gas all over within the boat!

Also, pick up a plug in GFI to go on the gen-set output. It might save your life in a moment of terminal stupidity.
 

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Senior Member
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19,489 Posts
If you use a dinghy/tender consider running the gen in that, tied astern. (Use a proper extension cord) Gets fumes and noise away from the boat, and they're light enough to easily transfer in and out for storage/travel.
 

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Telstar 28
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Go ahead... ask SWAY how he knows about the GFI... :) :)
Just got done running my little Yamaha ($700) to charge up my battery on my 21' Cal while at the mooring last weekend. I even kept it charging while I swung ship to adjust my new compass. The Honda 2000 is larger than mine but both are quiet and easy to use. Make sure that the gas cap and it's vent seal well. You'll want to actually close them and tip the gen-set over to verify this. Much better than finding gas all over within the boat!

Also, pick up a plug in GFI to go on the gen-set output. It might save your life in a moment of terminal stupidity.
 

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Owner, Green Bay Packers
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1,000 Posts
If you use a dinghy/tender consider running the gen in that, tied astern. (Use a proper extension cord) Gets fumes and noise away from the boat, and they're light enough to easily transfer in and out for storage/travel.
If you do, you'd better make sure you've got that GFI I mentioned. It will be quite easy to discover any deficiencies in your extension cord this way.

I leave mine on deck...it's not putting out any more CO than my outboard motor and CO is the least of the ways my o/b has tried to kill me!
 

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Telstar 28
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CO is also probably the slowest and least efficient way your OB has tried to kill you... :)
If you do, you'd better make sure you've got that GFI I mentioned. It will be quite easy to discover any deficiencies in your extension cord this way.

I leave mine on deck...it's not putting out any more CO than my outboard motor and CO is the least of the ways my o/b has tried to kill me!
 

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You can avoid most CO issues simply by putting the Honda 2000 on the downwind part of the boat. At anchor, you could haul it up a halyard or use the topping lift...it's under 50 lbs. A 22 footer is going to be somewhat weight sensitive, however, so I wouldn't recommend using it underway, because you'll want it low and dry as you can get it.

I use mine in a number of situations around the house, like when I need power for tools on the roof or some distance from an outside plug. On the boat, it goes on the aft deck with the exhaust pointed whatever direction "away" is. I've never smelled it, and I have a CO detector aboard.
 

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Telstar 28
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This isn't always true... ever hear of the "station wagon" effect. If the canvas or cabin top shape is wrong, the air flow can pull the exhaust from the genset "upwind" into the boat. Granted, the exhaust isn't actually moving upwind, but unless you're aware of the problems caused by the canvas or cabintop... you might think it is downwind, when it really isn't.



You can avoid most CO issues simply by putting the Honda 2000 on the downwind part of the boat. At anchor, you could haul it up a halyard or use the topping lift...it's under 50 lbs. A 22 footer is going to be somewhat weight sensitive, however, so I wouldn't recommend using it underway, because you'll want it low and dry as you can get it.

I use mine in a number of situations around the house, like when I need power for tools on the roof or some distance from an outside plug. On the boat, it goes on the aft deck with the exhaust pointed whatever direction "away" is. I've never smelled it, and I have a CO detector aboard.
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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You know, I get the whole "take every safety precaution" warnings that people recommend, but golly, all these boats being manufactured with outboard motors, inboard motors and no CO detectors required. From all the warnings about CO all the time, you would think there would be piles of dead bodies littering our waterways.
 

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Senior Member
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You know, I get the whole "take every safety precaution" warnings that people recommend, but golly, all these boats being manufactured with outboard motors, inboard motors and no CO detectors required. From all the warnings about CO all the time, you would think there would be piles of dead bodies littering our waterways.
True, Ray, but those are generally arranged with the exhausts outboard or overboard... Someone running a genny in an ill advised location is much more at risk.

Every once in a while (thankfully rarely, as you point out) you hear the story of a crew that simply didn't wake up in the morning - and those stories tend to stick in one's mind...
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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well that little Honda 2k is a great little generator. It's big enough to use at home when the lights go out and small enough to take on the boat. We ran ours in the dink, just as Ron suggested, but more to cut down on the noise than any other reason. I don't have a CO detector in our boat, but then I'm the kind of guy that goes swimming right after eating without the half hour mandatory waiting period that mom always enforced, so I live right on the edge.
 

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Telstar 28
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Also, most outboards exhaust underwater... and the boat is generally moving... making the chances of exhaust getting into the boat much lower than the situation where a genny is used on deck, where the exhaust gets pulled into the boat through a hatch by turbulent airflow caused by the mast or canvas on the boat.
 

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This isn't always true... ever hear of the "station wagon" effect. If the canvas or cabin top shape is wrong, the air flow can pull the exhaust from the genset "upwind" into the boat. Granted, the exhaust isn't actually moving upwind, but unless you're aware of the problems caused by the canvas or cabintop... you might think it is downwind, when it really isn't.

That's on a moving boat, right? I'm not advocating that practice, although iif I was sailing flat and level with wind from aft of the beam and wanted to charge the windlass battery forward, I don't think running the Honda 20 feet forward of the pilothouse opening ports would incur blue lips.
 
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