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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to better understand how my furler is rigged. I recently had to increase the length of the furling line in order to fully furl a newly installed larger genoa.

In the process of removing the sail and taking additional line wraps around the furler, I noticed that the aluminum extrusions were separating at a joint about 4' up from the deck. I could slide the extrusions together by hand and they do not appear to be damaged but seeing the separation like that made me wonder if I have a problem. The unit seems to work fine in terms of furling and unfurling the sail but the ability for the extrusions to move vertically left me concerned. Any thoughts?

See pic below. Joint in question about 4' up from deck
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Do you have a better pic of the problem? What model furler is it??.. looks a bit like a Profurl from a distance.

The extrusions should be clamped at the top and it's quite normal to have a bit of play vertically... but is there much play in the extrusions rotationally?? ie. if you try to twist a lower one by hand. I'd be more concerned about that.

A close-up of the "separating" joint would help a lot in working out whether you have a problem or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I believe it is a seafurlurl. Let me try to get a better pic when I get back to boat on Monday. There is zero rotational flexing. It is all vertical. But the joint in the picture can open to about a 2" gap. Can you elaborate on ends being clamped. The Furler cameI with the boat and beyond stepping the mast and Tightening the rigging I know very little about the technical aspects of the furler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I did find one other pic on my phone. Not real great either but might help. The joint in the picture is darker colored. In this pic it is separated about 1".since hoisting the new 135 I can slide it about 2" open.
 

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Sailor
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It sounds like you have play in the sections where the extrusions are connected. This is not normal. There is an insert between extrusion units to join them and make them turn as a unit. There should be some type of set screw, probably with an Allen head, holding them together. I bet the screw is there but loose, preventing vertical seperation completely but not tight enough to keep them in place. Time for ladder or bosuns chair work!

Tod
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Sounds like it is time to understand exactly how the extrusions connect and work... The idea of an insert sounds right. I recall seeing something like that when rigged. Did not see a screw as part of that picture but that does mean it wasn't there. Thanks all...
 

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Why not check directly with Hood. It would be good to figure out what model you have. There are a lot of Hood SeaFurl units out there. Perhaps it was one of them? Look them up on the internet, Pompanette is their parent company and contact them for a manual. They will, I'm sure, gladly send you one. Then you will know how the extrusions are connected and be able to get replacements if available.

Tod


Mandolin, Bayfield 36 out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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If you can find the model number on the drum you can probably find the manual online.

On my Hood furler the sections are joined with delrin allen head screws.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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The older 'Seafurl' used rivets, but if it's the 'Seafurl II' the sections are held together with a 'button lock' system - basically joiners with a button on either end that fit into holes in the track sections. The joiners are held in places using 'splice pieces' supported by an inner bearing tube around the wire forestay. It is not uncommon for the splice pieces to slide down inside the furler allowing the buttons to separate, but this would usually allow some amount of rotation also, so what you're describing shouldn't be possible.. Maybe something is missing completely?

A close-up photo of the section join in question would be a huge help in nutting this out.

PS: I have a copy of the 'Seafurl' and 'Seafurl II' manuals and could email them you if you want but they are very difficult to understand and I seriously doubt they will help with this problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the offer of manuals Classic. I have the manual aorund here somewhere too. Need to dig it out. I started this thread while on a biz trip. I am now home and will dig into the manuals. However, I finished an 8 hour drive home today and was on boat by 3pm. Forgot all about the furler concern and went sailing. it worked fine so i doubt it is anything serious. But I hope to get a chance to look at in detail tomorrow if temps allow outdoor activities. Man I am so done with winter...
 

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I had the same problem on my 1982 Hood SeaFurl. My extrusions locked together with what I can only describe as interlocking tabs on the ends of each extrusion and then had two Allen set screws ate each end. See attached picture. The set screw holes had elongated to about 1/4". This happened at each joint (except the short extrusion at the top...) and eventually boogered up the top extrusion from it sliding up the forestay and slamming in to the swage on the marine eye. Not to mince words, you have a big problem. Not only will it screw up the top extrusion, which will act like a fish hook and razor knife, grabbing, wrapping and cutting your halyard (had to go up the mast once to un-snarl when I could not reef, could not drop the sail and had a squall approaching), but the working at the extrusion joints will destroy the luff tape on that new genoa very quickly.

I contacted Pompanette and they said they could find the extrusions but the price was astronomical because the unit was so old. after looking at the cost of repairing the old unit versus a new unit, I decide to step up 32 years in technology and get a new Harken MKIV Unit 3. My SeaFurl was great but was just tired after a lot of miles. i think that if you look at the potential cost of replacing all the extrusions, any possible damage to the sail and the headache of being stranded when it craps out, you will go the same route and replace the entire unit.

Found this mess when I went up the mast, with a squall approaching and full genoa out, to deal with a wrapped halyard that rendered furling impossible. Turns out that the halyard had gotten hung on the sharp point and wouldn't let go without going up the mast. Also, see the extrusion joints at the bottom of the photo. I used a hacksaw to remove the cancer, leaving nice, smooth top to the extrusions and things were fine for a while...



Then the problem recurred and this was taken a year later in New Zealand:





My solution:



(I ended up ditching the long link plates in favor of an extra toggle)



:) :) :) :)
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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I had the same problem on my 1982 Hood SeaFurl. My extrusions locked together with what I can only describe as interlocking tabs on the ends of each extrusion and then had two Allen set screws ate each end. See attached picture. The set screw holes had elongated to about 1/4". This happened at each joint (except the short extrusion at the top...) and eventually boogered up the top extrusion from it sliding up the forestay and slamming in to the swage on the marine eye. Not to mince words, you have a big problem. Not only will it screw up the top extrusion, which will act like a fish hook and razor knife, grabbing, wrapping and cutting your halyard (had to go up the mast once to un-snarl when I could not reef, could not drop the sail and had a squall approaching), but the working at the extrusion joints will destroy the luff tape on that new genoa very quickly.
On that style furler there was a piece of aluminium split in half called a 'top bearing assembly' that slid inside the top extrusion and supported it around the forestay and stopping it riding up on the eye... But you seem to be missing the entire thing altogether! :eek:

I contacted Pompanette and they said they could find the extrusions but the price was astronomical because the unit was so old. after looking at the cost of repairing the old unit versus a new unit, I decide to step up 32 years in technology and get a new Harken MKIV Unit 3. My SeaFurl was great but was just tired after a lot of miles. i think that if you look at the potential cost of replacing all the extrusions, any possible damage to the sail and the headache of being stranded when it craps out, you will go the same route and replace the entire unit.
FWIW, my Seafurl 3250 was newer than yours but was a PITA to adjust and after play between the extrusions wore holes in the luff of my headsail, I decided it was headed for the scrap bin.

I chose to a Furlex instead of the Harken. Couldn't be happier. :)
 
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