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HMSINDY
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Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a boat with an electric in mast roller furling system by Hood. Does anyone have tips for furling in heavy weather? I only recall something about clockwise furling if furling on a port tack or something like that. Comments and practical tips appreciated.
 

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I have the manual Hood System but I have learned the following;
-have as little rake as possible in the mast
-regardless of tack, always furl and unfurl in the same direction
-in heavy weather you want to head up a bit when reefing in order to depower the main
-keep all parts of system well lubricated, unless sealed
Be more than happy to discuss further. Also, do you have a flute stopper? If not you will drive everyone crazy when at the dock and the wind is 10-20 degrees abaft the stern. What kind of boat do you have?
 

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HMSINDY
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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice. I have a Bristol 45 that I took ownership of last week. There are a great many systems to learn on this boat and it''ll take some time to get up to speed. My last boat is a Tartan 34 without much of the electronics, furling and other gear now found on the Bristol - quite a step up really.
 

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Nice boat! If it was sold when new by Norwalk Cove Marina (CT) I probably looked at it. I recently looked at a Bristol 54.4, Just massive and a little too much boat for me. I have a Pedrick 47; designed by Dave Pedrick and built by Cheoy Lee--very comfortably equipped and a good off shore boat as well as excellent cruising boat. We brought her to Maine Three years ago after spending 10 years on Long Island Sound. You should try Maine if you haven''t done so already.
 

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We have the Hood in mast furling on our 1981 Gulfstar 44 and always furl in the same direction but for no particular reason other than that was the direction it was furled in the first place!
Do you know how to furl it manually if the electric motor fails?
 

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HMSINDY
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Discussion Starter #6
No, I don''t know how the system furls manually. I did notice a small lever on the mast. I tried to see if it was related to the furling system and a perculiar item (looked like the star shaped female hole on top of all winches but without the winch) on the fareward facing side of the mast. Either I didn''t engage the inner winch properly or there is a stripped gear inside. Anyway, nothing seemed to be working in any manual form. Thanks in advance for you comments and advice.
 

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John,

You should be able to do two things with that Hood System;
1) Lock the furling gear so that the sail cannot unfurl by itself and
2) Manually engage the furling gear by moving the lever you noticed and inserting a which handle in the opening. You should than be able to furl or unfurl.
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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Re: Hood in mast furling - direction of furl

I had to learn this. I first heard this from my boat manager but confirmed it in my Hood Stoway manual.
1. Head into the wind and ease the mainsheet. (Improves angle of sail to luff slot for furling)
2. Ease outhaul keeping light tension. (Ensures smooth sail furling)
3. Rotate the luff rod with the toggle switch, deflecting the switch in whichever way permits the sail to furl without bearing on the leeward edge of the luff slot (i.e. On the starboard tack furl in the counterclockwise direction and on a port tack furl in the clockwise direction.) If you are headed directly into the wind it doesn't matter which direction you furl.

It goes on to describe the function of the alarm buzzer. My boat is a 1983 Hinckley SW 59 masthead sloop. My boat manager has worked for Hinckley, was Henry Hinckley's personal captain at one time, and has known the boat since new. I do not know why I check him on this stuff, just curious I guess. I hope that helps.
 

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Re: Hood in mast furling - direction of furl

I had to learn this. I first heard this from my boat manager but confirmed it in my Hood Stoway manual.
1. Head into the wind and ease the mainsheet. (Improves angle of sail to luff slot for furling)
2. Ease outhaul keeping light tension. (Ensures smooth sail furling)
3. Rotate the luff rod with the toggle switch, deflecting the switch in whichever way permits the sail to furl without bearing on the leeward edge of the luff slot (i.e. On the starboard tack furl in the counterclockwise direction and on a port tack furl in the clockwise direction.) If you are headed directly into the wind it doesn't matter which direction you furl.

It goes on to describe the function of the alarm buzzer. My boat is a 1983 Hinckley SW 59 masthead sloop. My boat manager has worked for Hinckley, was Henry Hinckley's personal captain at one time, and has known the boat since new. I do not know why I check him on this stuff, just curious I guess. I hope that helps.
We had a LH52 with hood furl and agree completely with the above advice. I would keep a wrap around a winch to create a little friction on the outhaul while pressing the furling button, playing one against the other. The issues occur if you don't furl it tight, it gets too big for the space in the mast and gets stuck. Then you've got trouble, especially if the wind is up.

Also agree winding into the wind so the sail is not rubbing against the aperture of the opening in the mast helps. In light wind, you can have a little load on the sail, that helps. In heavy wind, you need to point more directly into the wind. In all cases, watch it wrap, if it's not wrapping tight, stop, reverse, try again.

Deploying, same thing. Keep coordinated with the outhaul. Don't let the furler get ahead, it will bunch up.

At least on ours, the manual backup system was this little pulley that you attached to a pin on the mast. It drove the gear box that drove the furler with a lot of mechanical advantage (the gear box must of been 10:1 or something, you pulled on a line on the pulley a lot before you got a turn of the furler).

In 10 years of ownership, I never jammed it, but came close. It sure is convenient...no sail packing, and infinite reefing range. As long as you don't get it jammed.
 

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Master Mariner
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We have the Hood stowaway system and the original owner's manual. By the way, we love it. We unfurl or furl on almost any point of sail except a dead run, without problems. The motor has an installation fault on our boat, where the water displacement wasn't beyond the outer edge of the motor, so I cut a funnel to fit as a water diverter and siliconed it into place. The old owner said it had to be rebuilt every 2 years, but we're going on 5 now w/o a hitch.
If I remember right, counter clockwise furling is the only way to go because for some reason the motor has more power in that direction, according to the manual. I would not recommend any "prebend" in your mast and be certain your sailmaker hasn't accounted for it when he built the sail. I don't see why rake would matter, but? Be sure to have the boom at an angle that will pull the sail out evenly; foot and leach. There is a learning curve to this system. Always watch what's going on carefully and if things begin to go wrong, stop immediately and go backwards. If things are not going well, baby steps; a little bit at a time. You cannot force it to do what you wish; the motor is not strong enough. Doing it this way, we have NEVER gotten the sail fouled up. It has ALWAYS come out or gone in. Eventually, I'd like to change to a hydraulic drive.
Most important; if the sail is baggy in the middle of the luff, it will definitely cause problems unfurling the sail. If so, see if you can get a sailmaker to take out the bag, or start saving for a new main. Don't throw the baby out w/ the bath water here. It's NOT the furler, it's the sail. I'm guessing that an old, baggy sail is the biggest reason some owners hate their inmast furling. We've met a few cruising couples who were going to go back to slab reefing, but got the main fixed or replaced and now love the system. enjoy.
Eric Pearson is apparently THE the expert on Hood stowaway systems; 401-423-1568.
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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Capta, I agree on everything but your single direction of furling (counterclockwise). I have also seen this posted elsewhere. The points above in my post are from the Hood manual for the system. Hinckley (at your old Little Harbor yard in Portsmouth) confirmed those Hood manual directions in my previous post and so did Peter Linwick at Florida Rigging & Hydraulics, one of the few US dealers that still stocks parts and works on this system. He even has new switch/alarm panels. I see Eric Pearson's name associated with these Hood systems also. In Jamestown, RI?
 

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Master Mariner
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Capta, I agree on everything but your single direction of furling (counterclockwise). I have also seen this posted elsewhere. The points above in my post are from the Hood manual for the system. Hinckley (at your old Little Harbor yard in Portsmouth) confirmed those Hood manual directions in my previous post and so did Peter Linwick at Florida Rigging & Hydraulics, one of the few US dealers that still stocks parts and works on this system. He even has new switch/alarm panels. I see Eric Pearson's name associated with these Hood systems also. In Jamestown, RI?
The counter clockwise is directly from my Pearson owner's manual for the Hood Stowaway for the reason stated; it's stronger. I certainly do not understand the discrepancy, unless it is the date, 1981, or the size, about 53'? If it's important to anyone, I can dig it out and copy it for posting, but I can't see it matters all that much. I used to furl it clockwise because the buttons were up for putting out (up) sail, and down for furling, but changed it after reading that.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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This has been an interesting discussion. When we bought our boat the manual for the furled was not onboard. The selling broker who worked for the Hood-related agency said to furl in so that the sail goes in on the windward side of the slot. Over the years my wife has decided that pushing the toggle forward is to be used to furl and aft to unfurl. I imagine about half of the time that means it is clockwise and half not. In our experience (pushing 35,000 miles) it all seems to work fine. In total it has been a great piece of kit. More than 30 years old and works just fine.

We have a new mainsail waiting for us in Grenada. Perhaps with stiff new cloth we will have to be more careful. The old Hood main was pretty soft and basically shot after so many miles.
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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27 Posts
Killarney,
Best wishes for fair winds and kindly seas. I would be interested to hear how the Hood Stoway system works with a stiff new mainsail. I have been researching this system quite a bit this week as I want to restore my Hood electric mainsail furling control panel. Hinckley put me in contact with Bob Hood who has been very helpful. Peter Linwick at Florida Rigging and Hydraulics is also very knowledgeable with a good parts stock. This is what I learned. The overload alarm is a Mallory Sonalert SC628 readily available for about $20 on the internet. Many iterations of this, versions A to H but it appears that the original SC628 is the right one. The switch is a Cole Hersee momentary on-off-momentary on, listed as "(on)-off-(on)" in the specifications. They make two versions of this, 25 and 30 amp. I will need to pull mine to see which one. Cole Hersee also has the little black rubber boot that fits over the switch for water protection in both half and full boot configuration. The switch is readily available on the internet for about $15. If you want the Hood casting with both of these switch/alarm units in a fully loaded assembly, Peter has two new ones still in stock for $380. Good old boats are about rebuilding, restoring and reusing, where possible. I'll put a nice white epoxy paint on the housing after cleaning it up while I rebuild mine. I retire the end of this month and will spend two months aboard and sailing from Bristol, RI and the NE coast of the US so I am planning my projects. Down to the Caribbean next year (Oct) and then we will see. Your Bristol 44.4 is a great cruising sailboat with quality american workmanship. Warm regards.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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We won't get a chance to try the new main until sometime in November. Getting a bit antsy to be sailing again.
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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Thanks, Shimson. Good advice on locking the Stoway's gear. Yes, the Mary Sunshine is a big girl, displacing 69,000 lbs. the Hinckley SW59 is no lightweight. Still, returning from Nantucket to Newport last month in true 18-20 knot winds and heading into 3-4 ft. seas about 2 points off the port bow, under full sails on a close haul all afternoon was a magical time. Stiff and weatherly, heeled over at 16-18 deg. with the toe rail well out of the water, she was not working at all hard, even under full sails. Yes, I would pinch a bit when it puffed above 20 knots. An easy afternoon of 8.5 knots, with her centerboad all the way down to 12.5 ft.and a working jib (100%), pulling an inflatable dinghy astern. Close hauled is not her fastest point of sail nor is pulling a high drag dinghy, but the sea motion is what was so impressive; minimal and smooth, with the bow just cleanly slicing through the waves with only a light and comfortable amount of weather helm. The bow spray was going out about 30 yards with very little spray coming back over the center cockpit hood. The foredeck was wet but only awash a couple of times. We had four porpoises playing in our bow spray for about 30 minutes in the setting sun. Great fun for them it appeard. Great fun for us too. Magical.
We head to Maine and Canada next summer then down to the Caribbean for next winter. I am looking forward to that. Any cruising stops in Maine that you particularly liked?
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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Good advice but I respectfully disagree on the single direction of furl. Do you have the Hood Stoway manual? See my posts above.
 

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we are refitting a 28 m sailing charter, and are looking for a represenative or suplier of hood main furling systems. I tried to call eric pearson as you mentioned, but no response yet. Do you know his email adress or any other company that might be able to deliver spares? thanks in advance for your rely,

Frank van Dijk
Mariteam Shipyard
www.mariteamshipyard.nl
[email protected]
+31-166657020
+31-618825402
 

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Master Mariner
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8,535 Posts
we are refitting a 28 m sailing charter, and are looking for a represenative or suplier of hood main furling systems. I tried to call eric pearson as you mentioned, but no response yet. Do you know his email adress or any other company that might be able to deliver spares? thanks in advance for your rely,

Frank van Dijk
Mariteam Shipyard
www.mariteamshipyard.nl
[email protected]
+31-166657020
+31-618825402
"Peter Linwick" <[email protected]> has been very helpful and seems very knowledgeable.
 

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Master, 100T with Sailing
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Frank:
Peter Linwick at Florida Rigging and Hydraulics I have worked with and found to be very helpful, with both his knowledge and parts, for the Hood Stoway furling system. His email is [email protected] or their general service email is [email protected]. Their general service telephone is 561.863.7444. They claim to have the best Hood Stoway parts inventory in the US. The other person that I read on numerous posts that services these is Eric Pearson at 14 Backstay Rd., Jamestown, RI 02835. His telephone is 401.423.1568. I have not used Eric but he is well regarded and recommended from others as knowing these furling systems well and is respected for his servie on them. Those are the top two in the US that I am aware of. Specific problems or just a general refit?
Good luck,
Don
 
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