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Hi everyone. I would like to get your input concerning an issue I'm having with my boat. My Mariner 36 sailboat has a "Hood"- "Sea Furl" furling system. The system uses regular metal mechanical bearings in both the halyard swivel unit, and the drum at the bottom of the extrusion piece that covers the forestay. I've verified the halyard swivel unit bearings have a lot of corrosion, and suspect the bearings in the bottom drum does as well. To remove and replace the bearings I need to remove the forestay at the bow and remove both of the furling system units. I intend to support the furling system extrusion that covers the forestay with the jib halyard while doing this. The only other halyard I have is for the mainsail. Maybe I could use it as an additional safety as a temporary forestay while doing the work? The mast of my boat is keel stepped. I'm nervous about taking the forestay loose to do this work. Will the remaining stays on both starboard, port, and the backstay support the mast properly while I do this work?
 

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Keel Steeped? How big is the boat? I would try and use a halyard at the front of the mast, but if you don't have a spare and you plan on using your jib halyard for something else during the process, then you can run the main halyard to the bow. The stick won't fall over being keel stepped.

I would first losen the rigging on the lowers intermediates and backstay equally. Lets say 5 full turns on each. Then take off the forestay and furler.

Install new bearings and re-install forestay and furler, then put the 5 turns back on. Sight up the mast, check to see if it's in column, and you should be GTG. It gets tricky on boats that are deck stepped, but then you just run a spare line to the bow to act as a forestay, and add a little tension to it. No worries.
 

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The jib halyard will be plenty. As long as no one pushes hard on the mast you could do nothing and it wouldn't come down (it wouldn't be safe, but it wouldn't come down).

Seafurl is the generic name for all Hood furlers. Do you know which one you have? Is it single line or double line?
 

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Hi Stede,
I found your post while searching for some answers to my Hood SL problems. Mine is a SL 800 that was converted from the LD system by one of the po's.
I have had mine apart and it is not difficult to do. Prior to removal and full disassembly you might try flushing it with fresh water. I hear the salt cakes up in it and can cause the corrosion and other problems to the system.
Remove the aft and forward tack sockets. These are the darker colored inserts that go inside the turnbuckle tube. This is done by removing the Tack Socket Screw (the nylon screw) and sliding the forward tack socket up and our of the tube. Once that is out, remove the aft tack socket by moving the tube off center on the front stay and sliding the sail track up and out of the turnbuckle tube. The socket can then be slid out of the tube. Flush with a warm soapy water solution and then rinse.
Just reverse the removal procedure and try it out. If it works, you'll save having to remove the assembly. It's been a while since your initial post so you might have solved your problem but if you get this and could respond, please let me know how many bearings are in each race. That's my problem. There are suppose to be an equal number of stainless and "torolon" (plastic) bearings in each race but after loosing half of mine to Neptune, I don't know how many to put in each race. I think I have too many in mine and the drum turns very hard.
Good Sailing,
Stegs
Great Lakes, Salt Free, No Sharks!
 

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The SeaFurl manual that came w/my roller furling, on p17, shows the 800 series takes 28 Torlon bearings per race. "13. Bearings (Torlon)....1/4-4203L...28 per race..(2 Bearings Races)" It dates back to late '93 or early 1994. Hope this helps.
 
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