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How do you attach reefing lines to your main? Do you simply use a bowline, or is it possible to use a snap shackle or other way to get her rigged quickly and securely?
 

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Kick,

Pass the line though the sail and tie stopper knots on both sides of the sail so they don't fall off. What size boat do you have?
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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Denby, I think he's talking about jiffy reefing lines, or a single line reefing system.

Kick, I typed "single line reefing" into a google search, then clicked on images. There are pages of drawings and pictures of every configuration of reefing line you can think of.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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With my loose footed main, I run the reefing line from the end of the boom sheave, up to the reef cringle and back down to the boom, where I tie a bowline around the boom. This gives me a solid platform to crank in hard and get the tension I need.
 

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With my loose footed main, I run the reefing line from the end of the boom sheave, up to the reef cringle and back down to the boom, where I tie a bowline around the boom. This gives me a solid platform to crank in hard and get the tension I need.
Second this plan... If the sail is not loose footed, then do the same but use a padeye or fitting on the boom for the end of the reef line. Avoid extra hardware like shackles - just something else to whack you in the head when it comes adrift....
 

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Third this plan... and defintely agree no shackles should be used unless you like getting flailed with them. Also, using a snap shackle means that the reefing line might accidentally be released under sail.. If that happens and you've got the reefing nettles tied in... you're probably going to tear your sail really badly. Reefing lines are not lines you want to be "quick-release" EVER.

Second this plan... If the sail is not loose footed, then do the same but use a padeye or fitting on the boom for the end of the reef line. Avoid extra hardware like shackles - just something else to whack you in the head when it comes adrift....
 

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The man is right, in a stiff breeze you will get flailed with them, probably up the eyes or teeth. When you are reefing, there will be a stiff breeze, or worse.

Just tie them with that best-of-the-best knot... cue fanfare of trumpets in B.... the bowline.
 

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Telstar 28
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Denby is talking about the nettles, not the reefing lines themselves.
Kick,

Pass the line though the sail and tie stopper knots on both sides of the sail so they don't fall off. What size boat do you have?
 

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That was actually my posting that started the thread. I was using Kick's computer and didn't realize the post had his name on it until it was too late.

This is for our Beneteau 50, not loose footed. We had it reefed last month and tied a bowline directly to the eye in the sail (kringle?).

Now that I think of it, there's no place to tie off the end of the reefing line, except sliding eyes of sorts that's in the track at the bottom of the sail. We could have used them last month.
 

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Warm Weather Sailor
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Pass the line up, through the cringle in the sail, and down the other side. Make it fast to the eye at bottom of the boom with a figure 8 knot or bowline. I take it you're talking about the reefing line at the leech and not single line reefing with another line at the luff.
 

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This is for our Beneteau 50, not loose footed. We had it reefed last month and tied a bowline directly to the eye in the sail (kringle?).
Definitely don't do it this way!!:eek: But you already seem to recognize this isn't the right approach.

I'll only add to the good advice above that it is preferable to have the termination point for the reefing line (where it secures to the boom after passing through the cringle) somewhat aft of the cringle itself. This helps to get good outhaul tension on the reefed sail.

If you reef the sail with insufficient "outhaul" tension (provided by the reefing line), you can end up with too much draft in the sail and it may not depower as you'd expect from taking a reef.
 

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There's 2 lines for each reef. (Double line reefing?)

I don't think I'd trust a figure 8 knot. I read somewhere (maybe sailnet) about a better stopper knot that doesn't come undone, and converted all my figure 8s to it. Not sure of the name for it.

The bowline sounds the best. That and half hitches can't be beat IMHO.
 

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The attachment points that on the bottom of the boom slide. So there may be no way to attach the end of the reefing line outward of the eye in the sail. It would tend to be straight down from the eye. Unless I run a line from the eye toward the outhaul end of the boom.
 

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The attachment points that on the bottom of the boom slide. So there may be no way to attach the end of the reefing line outward of the eye in the sail. It would tend to be straight down from the eye. Unless I run a line from the eye toward the outhaul end of the boom.
Are those attachment points on the boom free floating, or is there a way to secure them in place? If not, you might be able to add some hardware to the track they slide in, that could act as a stopper to hold them in place just aft of the cringle.

The good news is that even if you just use them as is, you'll be WAY ahead of where you were previously.
 

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Midwest Puddle Pirate
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There's 2 lines for each reef. (Double line reefing?)

I don't think I'd trust a figure 8 knot. I read somewhere (maybe sailnet) about a better stopper knot that doesn't come undone, and converted all my figure 8s to it. Not sure of the name for it.

The bowline sounds the best. That and half hitches can't be beat IMHO.
That would be the double overhand knot. The problem with a figure 8 is that it will come untied from a stiff line without a load on it. If you keep tension on it then it will stay put, but then there are better knots for use under constant tension.
 

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Yes, it's the double overhand knot.



The figure 8 knot and the clove hitch are banned from my boat, and for the same reason. They don't stay in place under varying loads.
 

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Are those attachment points on the boom free floating, or is there a way to secure them in place? If not, you might be able to add some hardware to the track they slide in, that could act as a stopper to hold them in place just aft of the cringle.

The good news is that even if you just use them as is, you'll be WAY ahead of where you were previously.
John, that is the case. I'll have to rig a line that will act like a (one sided) traveller.

Or I could use my favorite knot, the very adjustable taut-line hitch that stays in place after you adjust it. (Note it is sometimes call the midshipman's hitch but I've seen that same name on similar but NOT suitable knots. So beware if it uses that name. Better to simply refer to this one as the taut-line hitch) Note also that on some more slippery lines (poly lines), you'll need two of these in a row. The second one (further up the main line) helps the first one hold fast.

 

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That's a tautline hitch. I have taught it to perhaps 300 young boys in my troop over the last 20 years. Required knot and would be able to put up real canvas tents and dining flies without it.
 

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Are those attachment points on the boom free floating, or is there a way to secure them in place? If not, you might be able to add some hardware to the track they slide in, that could act as a stopper to hold them in place just aft of the cringle...
Great idea John. Thanks!!
 

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That's a tautline hitch. I have taught it to perhaps 300 young boys in my troop over the last 20 years. Required knot and would be able to put up real canvas tents and dining flies without it.
Yes, it's been my favorite for maybe 30 years. I use it all the time.
 
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