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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For a circumnavigation, what is the minimum size of sailboat one should have and what is the maximum size for one man?
 

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The great Sir Francis Chichester apparently said that a boat needed to be one foot long for every year of a man's age to provide the necessary comfort.
That means I need a 68 footer!
However I know I could not handle anything so big without a crew.
Personally, I think the ideal size for solo is between 29 and 35 feet, but there's way more to it than length. Search these forums for much discussion on what makes a good offshore boat.
 

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Picnic Sailor
Moody 425
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I think Arvicola Amphibus is on the money.
You could go smaller, 24- 26 if you really wanted to in the right boat.

For me 35ft would be my magic figure depending on what kind of boat we are talking about.
 

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I would probably settle on something in the mid 40's. Large enough to have a good turn of speed, enough space to allow reasonable storage without having to get tubby. A little much to handle in a harbor solo but doable.
 

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Old as Dirt!
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Hey--If you want to go large, you could emulate Alain Colas who single handed the 72 meter, four masted schooner, "Club Mediterranee" in '76, eh
 

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Short version: Depends on what that one man is comfortable handling.

Long version: And in what conditions. There are way too many variables, way too many different types of people, and way too many options on boats and equipment these days. You could have a boat be virtually push-button with electric everything, which would mean a lot larger boat could be handled, but not everyone wants that.

Myself, I wouldn't think anything more than 40 would be what -I- would need, and would still be comfortable around on my own.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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It depends on many, many factors. What would be best on a passage is not best when you are anchored somewhere or having to fit into a crowded marina. I am quite comfortable sailing my heavy 45 footer but i can't imagine trying to dock Med-style (stern in) in a marina. In our travels the single handers have been on boats from 27 to 38 feet, but then again there are not that many single handers out there. Seem to be a lot more single handers sailing on the Internet.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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Well Jeanne Socrates has completed 2.99 circumnavigations on a Najad 380.

She turned 70 on the last one.

So that might do.

I have a 44 ft cutter and single hand that at age 68. Possibly time to replace the spi with a code zero on a furler though. Handling the pole is getting to be a bit to much for me.
 

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Evongelo,

You posted a number of questions in the forum. No issues, that's why we're here. However, you said in your introduction that you don't know how to sail and you are new to all this. May I suggest that you spend time in the Learning to Sail and then the Seamanship forums? I think you'll find that many of your initial questions have been asked by multitudes before you who are/were in your same position.

Learning to Sail - SailNet Community
Seamanship & Navigation - SailNet Community

The book recommendation thread may also be helpful:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/apps-authors/18184-recommended-reading.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I'm basically trying to gain knowledge right now. I've been doing a lot of reading on this topic, but it's so much to take in that it's nice to just ask direct questions instead of browsing for hours upon hours through the the internet or forums when you have one thing you want answered specifically.
 

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One of the reasons I did NOT purchase a 41-Morgan Out Island was I figured I would have some difficulty handling it single-handed. I opted for the 33 Morgan Out Island after looking carefully at what it had to offer. The features included: Large cockpit, huge interior space, loads of storage, large berths, high interior head room, mast under 50 feet so I could get under most bridges in my immediate area, great stability offshore, and larger engine size. All of these things were very important to me and for one very good reason. I was fairly confident that most of my sailing would be done alone, even the trip down the ICW two years ago. Even when my loving wife of more than a half century is with me, I'm sailing alone. Yeah, she took the same sailing course I took, but she CANNOT handle the boat by herself. Sure, if it were under power, she could steer it to the nearest dock, then she would just crash into it.

The 41 Morgan Out Island had many of the same features, plus a neat center cockpit and aft cabin, which I would have loved. But, the boat was much heavier, had a larger sail plan, which I wasn't sure I could handle, and a bit less forgiving. Additionally, the expense of keeping this boat at the marina was significantly more as well. My wife is already upset at how much I spend on boating every year - the 41 could have resulted in the catastrophic demise of my marital status. ;)

Cheers,

Gary :cool:
 

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Over Hill Sailing Club
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I would not want to deal with the weight and size of things above my 35'.
 

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Chastened
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Evongelo,

You posted a number of questions in the forum. No issues, that's why we're here. However, you said in your introduction that you don't know how to sail and you are new to all this. May I suggest that you spend time in the Learning to Sail and then the Seamanship forums? I think you'll find that many of your initial questions have been asked by multitudes before you who are/were in your same position.

Learning to Sail - SailNet Community
Seamanship & Navigation - SailNet Community

The book recommendation thread may also be helpful:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/apps-authors/18184-recommended-reading.html
Nope, that's not the way it's done on Sailnet. Read? Research? Learn to sail first?

That's for losers.

The real way to circumnavigate is to either seal yourself up in a converted beer keg and set off, or set off solo in a 70 foot Frers Hylas. No need for "seamanship". Give 'em an iPad and an EPIRB and everything will be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Nope, that's not the way it's done on Sailnet. Read? Research? Learn to sail first?

That's for losers.

The real way to circumnavigate is to either seal yourself up in a converted beer keg and set off, or set off solo in a 70 foot Frers Hylas. No need for "seamanship". Give 'em an iPad and an EPIRB and everything will be just fine.
I like this guy. The first person to be helpful out of everyone :p I was thinking wine cask as it seems more cultured and elegant if you will. And I don't like Apple, I use Toshiba. Besides, no one teaches sail fish how to sail and he seems to be just fine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
One of the reasons I did NOT purchase a 41-Morgan Out Island was I figured I would have some difficulty handling it single-handed. I opted for the 33 Morgan Out Island after looking carefully at what it had to offer. The features included: Large cockpit, huge interior space, loads of storage, large berths, high interior head room, mast under 50 feet so I could get under most bridges in my immediate area, great stability offshore, and larger engine size.

Gary :cool:
I was gathering that you don't want a large cockpit for open sea sailing. I read that it's more susceptible to storms? Am I wrong about that?
 

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Chastened
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Gary doesn't sail in the open ocean. He typically motors down the ICW where cockpit size is less of a variable.

This is why I'm telling you to forget aesthetics for the moment, and focus on what you want the boat to do for you, and then start looking at boats that fit those parameters.
 

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I think it was Bob Perry (?) who stated that for single handing long distances one should be able to physically man-handle the largest water soaked sail in the inventory while on a violently pitching deck in full gale conditions ... and that equates to a ~400 sq. ft. sail which further equates to a ~40ft. max. sized boat.
 

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Barquito
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I think it was Bob Perry (?) who stated that for single handing long distances one should be able to physically man-handle the largest water soaked sail in the inventory while on a violently pitching deck in full gale conditions ... and that equates to a ~400 sq. ft. sail which further equates to a ~40ft. max. sized boat.
Where those that sail larger boats are relying on more and more mechanisms to make sailing possible (electric winches, windlass, etc).
 

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I'm basically trying to gain knowledge right now. I've been doing a lot of reading on this topic, but it's so much to take in that it's nice to just ask direct questions instead of browsing for hours upon hours through the the internet or forums when you have one thing you want answered specifically.
I think that this board can be a great resourse. I think what DRFerron is saying is that yiou probably don't know the real questions to ask in the first place.
If you follow the norm, you will post here for a week or two, the board will get bored with your too open questions, you will get some snarky answers, and you will go away.

If you plan to sail alone do the work to get ready for it.
don't start in the middle.
 

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Its good to see everyone here recommends tiny size boat. It gives me something to disagree with! :D

I have circumnavigated, but only a third of that was solo, plus another 10,000 or so miles afterwards.

It would scare the crap outta me to be in a 29 footer!

Mine is a 39 and if you lot would toss a few dollars this way I would be buying a 50 to 55 foot boat.

Perfect size.

See Zanshins posts... He has a Jeaneau 54 and loves soloing it.

If you have the money: Go Big!!


Mark
 
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