SailNet Community banner

21 - 40 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I rarely sail between 10:00AM and 3:00PM. It's typically cooler and the breeze is steadier in the evening and early morning hours. If we are cruising this schedule allows us to more fully do touristy stuff ashore.during the day.

When we do sail during the day we wear gloves as well as the other protective gear others have mentioned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,526 Posts
Here is a photo of my solar bimini setup. Though the clear middle Lexan piece still has the protective cover on it. It includes both 12 volt and 48 volt (for electric propulsion) solar panels. I also put a flexible solar panel on top of the Lexan panel when I want more shade.
136372
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
4,805 Posts
How do you sun conscious and light skinned folks out there deal with this obvious dilemma?
The doctor says I am "light skinned". I never thought of myself that way, but still take precautions to protect myself from the Sun. I took me a long time, but now I understand the Sun is trying to kill me. Sometimes I an slack a little and only come away wounded.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,477 Posts
Here is a photo of my solar bimini setup. Though the clear middle Lexan piece still has the protective cover on it. It includes both 12 volt and 48 volt (for electric propulsion) solar panels. I also put a flexible solar panel on top of the Lexan panel when I want more shade. View attachment 136372
I have my flex panels mounted on clear 16mm lexan multi wall panels.
This works very well but if doing again, i would choose one of the smoke or bronze tints
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,371 Posts
I've basically spent my adult life in the sun in the tropics. After nearly 6 decades I thought I was pretty much immune to skin cancer. I didn't put on goo, ever, rarely a hat aboard and always shorts ant a t-shirt on the boat. Diving or snorkeling I'd wear a skin, but that was mostly to protect me from stinging creatures, not the sun. I have almost always sailed under a bimini over the last 25 years or so. I wouldn't be without one, period. Not specifically for sun protection, just comfort. The one we have has a nice window which gives me a great view of the main, but has a velcroed sun cover. Our new bimini will have an even better window and shade.
One day last year a small doughnut shaped growth appeared on my left shin. It grew amazingly fast until it was about an inch in diameter and a 1/4 inch high. Two doctors dismissed it and one thought it might be cancerous. The internet leaned toward non-cancerous because of the speed of growth. In the end it turned out to be Squamous Cell Carcinoma, not a particularly good thing to have. I had it removed and came to the conclusion that perhaps I wasn't immune to skin cancer after all.
Sadly, we've done little sailing since all this happened because of the pandemic, but I tend to stay out of the sun much more than I used to. I bought a few sets of very light scrubs and intend to wear them when sailing from now on, with a hat. I've always worn very expensive hi quality sun glasses, so that won't change. But, I live in the tropics and can't avoid the sun completely all the time and I'm not go to go so far overboard that living down here becomes unpleasant.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
There's no other way of saying it, I'm Irish. I love sailing, but... I'm Irish!
I have light skin and burn easily, and a light burn is something akin to a medium flu, fever. nausea and all.

So my main requirement is SHADE UNDERWAY. Oh sure you can throw up a bimini while at anchor, but what do you do underway, when the main sheet is obstructing, and when a wide brimmed hat and gobs of sunscreen just doesn't cut it?

So many boats, the vast majority really, even if they have a hard dodger with hard cover, put the wheel as far back on the boat as possible to be 'protected' from the shelter, in full blatant exposure to the searing glare of the sun.

How do you sun conscious and light skinned folks out there deal with this obvious dilemma?
I bought 7 long sleeve hooded synthetic quick drying shirts. I wear a wide brimmed hat and put sunblock on the backs of my hands, ears, nose and cheeks and I am good to go. No obstructions to view or movement, and it is cooler with the shirt than without when exposed to the sun.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
There's no other way of saying it, I'm Irish. I love sailing, but... I'm Irish!
I have light skin and burn easily, and a light burn is something akin to a medium flu, fever. nausea and all.

So my main requirement is SHADE UNDERWAY. Oh sure you can throw up a bimini while at anchor, but what do you do underway, when the main sheet is obstructing, and when a wide brimmed hat and gobs of sunscreen just doesn't cut it?

So many boats, the vast majority really, even if they have a hard dodger with hard cover, put the wheel as far back on the boat as possible to be 'protected' from the shelter, in full blatant exposure to the searing glare of the sun.

How do you sun conscious and light skinned folks out there deal with this obvious dilemma?
Pilothouse, think pilothouse! ;)
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,186 Posts
I am also of Irish descent (both parents). I have a dodger with a stainless steel frame, and a single hoop support for my bimini. The dodger is ALWAYS up, and the bimini is up when it is hot & sunny - And, yes I use both while sailing. There is a small window in the bimini so that I can see the masthead fly (Windex) while at the helm.

0417131722a.jpg


136403


I also wear a floppy hat, and sunscreen (when my wife reminds me).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
There's no other way of saying it, I'm Irish. I love sailing, but... I'm Irish!
I have light skin and burn easily, and a light burn is something akin to a medium flu, fever. nausea and all.

So my main requirement is SHADE UNDERWAY. Oh sure you can throw up a bimini while at anchor, but what do you do underway, when the main sheet is obstructing, and when a wide brimmed hat and gobs of sunscreen just doesn't cut it?

So many boats, the vast majority really, even if they have a hard dodger with hard cover, put the wheel as far back on the boat as possible to be 'protected' from the shelter, in full blatant exposure to the searing glare of the sun.

Go to any boating store they sell pants and light weight long sleeves that are super comfy and are specially designed to keep the sun off your skin. Get a tilly hat and something for your neck and light sox.
Good to go Mr. IRISH
 

·
Registered
Allied
Joined
·
24 Posts
We keep our dodger and bimini up at all times and have experience 60 kts of wind with the dodger up. We placed flexible panels on top of the bimini and has been working well for the last year living aboard. In addition to the bimini, we use a connector piece while at anchor or at a dock. The connector piece limits our view while sailing so we don't use it while underway. Overall, we have decent shade protection while underway, and as a fellow sailor mentioned, the autopilot enables you to tuck in under the dodger as well.

We're serious about the sun. We also wear hooded, long sleeved light shirts while sailing. View the image below to see what I'm referring to. Our boat is a ketch, so may be a little different than your set up.

136420
 

·
Registered
Allied
Joined
·
24 Posts
I am also of Irish descent (both parents). I have a dodger with a stainless steel frame, and a single hoop support for my bimini. The dodger is ALWAYS up, and the bimini is up when it is hot & sunny - And, yes I use both while sailing. There is a small window in the bimini so that I can see the masthead fly (Windex) while at the helm.

View attachment 136402

View attachment 136403

I also wear a floppy hat, and sunscreen (when my wife reminds me).
Nice looking dodger! Those hand holds I imagine provide some great support while underway. Looks robust and clean.
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,186 Posts
We're serious about the sun. We also wear hooded, long sleeved light shirts while sailing. View the image below to see what I'm referring to. Our boat is a ketch, so may be a little different than your set up.
Good point about clothing!

I have multiple sets of Gill Long Sleeve shirts from the various schools for which I have taught sailing. I wear the white long sleeve on hot days, and the long sleeve with the blue short sleeve over it on cool days.
136422

136423


These are moisture wicking and have a 50UV rating (which I assume is good).

I have tried to find the long sleeve shirts on the Gill website, so that I am not a sailing advertisement for my former employers, but have had no success.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Rush2112 and vessel

·
Registered
Allied
Joined
·
24 Posts
Here's what I use for clothing / sun protection in warmer climates. It's 100% polyester which can get sweaty... to be fair it also allows for some breathing through the fabric. Even has loops at the end of the sleeves for some hand protection.

136424
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,610 Posts
For almost twenty years, I sailed a boat without a bimini, dodger or other sun protection. When I decided to move up, a bimini was high on my list of must-haves. While my wife and daughter like to sunbathe, I stay covered up: wide-brimmed hat, sunblock shirt, lots of sunscreen. I keep the bimini up all summer, under sail, at the dock, and at anchor. The only time I fold it up is when we're expecting a storm with high winds. It is easier to see the main with the bimini folded, but I have a isinglass window on the roof that provides an adequate view of the sail.
HukilauJune2.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
311 Posts
I am also of Irish descent (both parents). I have a dodger with a stainless steel frame, and a single hoop support for my bimini. The dodger is ALWAYS up, and the bimini is up when it is hot & sunny - And, yes I use both while sailing. There is a small window in the bimini so that I can see the masthead fly (Windex) while at the helm.

View attachment 136402

View attachment 136403

I also wear a floppy hat, and sunscreen (when my wife reminds me).
A little thread drift, but... I often hear people complain about the high cost of canvas work. While it's a significant investment, when done correctly consider the value it adds to our boats and our ability to enjoy them. The photos above show remarkable detail and thought into the project. Adding canvas to the boat increases our comfort level, provides additional safety when moving about the boat and protects us from all types of weather - including the sun. What price do you put on that? Our project wasn't as extensive as shown here, but we never regret the money spent - only wish we did it sooner. Always enjoy looking at a well executed canvas project, thanks for sharing.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
12,163 Posts
A little thread drift, but... I often hear people complain about the high cost of canvas work. While it's a significant investment, when done correctly consider the value it adds to our boats and our ability to enjoy them. The photos above show remarkable detail and thought into the project. Adding canvas to the boat increases our comfort level, provides additional safety when moving about the boat and protects us from all types of weather - including the sun. What price do you put on that? Our project wasn't as extensive as shown here, but we never regret the money spent - only wish we did it sooner. Always enjoy looking at a well executed canvas project, thanks for sharing.
i agree. It’s turned our boat into a 3.5 season boat.

I feel extra fortunate as my wife made ours so it definitely saved over $5000.

It allowed us to customize the dodger so that it has a large open picture window in the front. No lines from wide seams of fabric and completely open for the breeze to come through. most dodgers we see done by professionals have three panels in front with only one able to open , plus that one gets bent abusing the glass.

Best part two is that she can repair any issues as it wears. Our last one lasted 10 years.

it’s also important to maintain it.
This means protectant for the glass. Washing it properly and waxing
That also means pulls for any zippers and zipper “ grease”
Also after year three it needs to have waterproofing spray
 
  • Like
Reactions: vessel

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
12,163 Posts
Here's what I use for clothing / sun protection in warmer climates. It's 100% polyester which can get sweaty... to be fair it also allows for some breathing through the fabric. Even has loops at the end of the sleeves for some hand protection.

View attachment 136424
polyester makes me sweat more
 

·
Registered
Allied
Joined
·
24 Posts
i agree. It’s turned our boat into a 3.5 season boat.

I feel extra fortunate as my wife made ours so it definitely saved over $5000.

It allowed us to customize the dodger so that it has a large open picture window in the front. No lines from wide seams of fabric and completely open for the breeze to come through. most dodgers we see done by professionals have three panels in front with only one able to open , plus that one gets bent abusing the glass.

Best part two is that she can repair any issues as it wears. Our last one lasted 10 years.

it’s also important to maintain it.
This means protectant for the glass. Washing it properly and waxing
That also means pulls for any zippers and zipper “ grease”
Also after year three it needs to have waterproofing spray
Nice pointers on maintenance for the canvas. I'll keep those tips in mind for ours :)
 
21 - 40 of 69 Posts
Top