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We never leave the motor on while towing, tow by the single bow eye as you're describing; off the quarter to starboard (the engine exhaust is to port.. towing to port gets engine exhaust/soot/grime on the tubes)

We like to tow it in fairly close to keep the dinghy in the flat water immediately behind the boat and of course use a floating line. If there's enough chop that the dinghy is likely to ship water we'll pull the transom plug so any spray accumulation will drain away as long as you're moving.. you may need to reinstall it right away once you stop/slow down - esp if you plan to leave the motor on.
 
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I much prefer the no-drag situation of not towing, along with the elimination of all the other potential issues.. and when we had a roll-up it was easy. We once were towing a wood-floor soft bottom in flat water and 20+ knots breeze. It flipped over on a tack and promptly 'suction-cupped' onto the surface; our 40 footer's momentum cleanly tore off one of the vulcanized towing eye patches...

NOB is discussing a RIB, which generally should tow better with a more robust towing eye than your typical soft inflatable. I don't like the obstruction to sightlines that an inflated dinghy presents on the foredeck.. for a long, potentially rough passage I'd probably deflate the boat and lash it forward for improved visibility and fewer issues.

The other aspect of towing, though, is that you have a ready-to-jump-into 'lifeboat' of sorts at all times.
 
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