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· first sailed january 2008
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Discussion Starter · #43 ·
Yeah. Nobody liked my fights joke either. Can't people tell Im joking around? I mean. I want help and good advice, but at the same time we're talking about dinghies. It's all fun. If you want to row, sail, motor....it doesn't matter. I mean, not to the point of gettin mad at each other. You can have a dinghy the size of a Washington state ferry for all I care.
 

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I believe this is international and not just relating to Australia but as far as I am aware Avon no longer produce the fold down transom boat that JE has. However since the takeover of Avon by Zodiac, Zodiac themselves now offer a fold down transom in two sizes. I'm guessing its basically the Avon in Zodiac colours.

How do Achilles compare to Zodiac ?
Apologies for not responding to this sooner...

Achilles makes a nice boat, my only issue with them are the chintzy oars/oarlocks...

Stephan Lance of Defender rates them highly... Stephan should know, Defender sells more inflatable boats than any other vendor in North America... Sounds like Achilles has a proprietary fabric which is now the closest to Dupont's now discontinued Hypalon, which a couple of other brands are now using... Interesting, how many inflatable brands are now coming out of China, and out of the same factory:

Hi Rick. Happy to help

Let me give you my down and dirty.

The inflatable boat biz is changing. Lots of players, many using each other's fabrics......some even building at the same factory.

Lots of new players coming to the US market. Some Korean production (not so great), some Chinese production (depends which factory is doing the building) and some from Croatia (Grand & Brig).

With Avon gone, I feel that Achilles has moved into the #1 spot from a service/quality/value perspective.
AB is doing better, but you really have to want an AB to pay for what they cost today.
Novurania bought Nautica's assets and I hope that leads to some smaller RIBs, but too soon to say. My all-time favorite RIB was the NU 320TR.
Mercury uses Achilles fabric on their CSM-Hypalon boats.
Zodiac Cadet RIBs in CSM-Hypalon are now being built with Achilles fabric.
Defender RIBs are also built with Achilles fabric (but I like a matte finish, so I went with that over the gloss used by others).
The above three brands are all built at the same factory now.....the best one in China. I have sold about 5000 boats that came out of that factory.
Lots of confidence in their ability and continue to find them excelling at what they do.

Lots of new players that are offering RIBs from the Pacific Rim, but few have a service network. Most do not have liability insurance and most are brands that will not likely be around for support when you need it.

West Marine. I understand that Zodiac and West are going down separate paths (that is all I will write here). West will go with another Vendor for their inflatable boats, probably the South Korean one that they have use for a couple of their existing models.

Caribe. The old Caribe boats may not be available in the US. Old distributor went with a line out of Korea (Highfield). Though they look nice on the showroom floor, I have owned and sold painted aluminum RIBs in the past......and simply put, cannot suggest that anyone buy one uless they like peeling paint. AB is now offering most of their RIB model in an unpainted aluminum and that is the way to go for an aluminum hull. Though, as stated above, be prepared to pay for it.

If you want to discuss over the phone, feel free to give me a shout.

To me, the best value in a lightweight RIB is my Defender boat (but, hell yeah, I am partial and I have a horse in the race).

Best value for a flat deck RIB with bow locker is the Achilles HB series, hands down.

New Zodiac Cadet RIBs and Mercury RIBs with flat decks are nice, but wayyy too heavy.

Happy Holidays to you all.

Stephan Lance

Hi Rick. Happy to help
 

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Can't imagine why you would tow an RIB; if you don't have davits it should be deflatable so that it can be carried. Too much tender for the boat, more is not better.

I think it's a trick question.
 

· Capt Blithe
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Yeah. Nobody liked my fights joke either. Can't people tell Im joking around? I mean. I want help and good advice, but at the same time we're talking about dinghies. It's all fun. If you want to row, sail, motor....it doesn't matter. I mean, not to the point of gettin mad at each other. You can have a dinghy the size of a Washington state ferry for all I care.
I don't think it's clear when you are joking around, sir, and it's definitely not funny stuff. I think a 10'RIB on a 26' boat is ridiculous. Was that the joke? Or was the boat a big chick magnet meant to say a BIG CHICK magnet. That's funny, I think, but wait... that was my joke , not yours.

Then you come along like some kind of mediator where you obviously have no standing to referee. I also wonder what is up with your question after question after question. Have you read nothing on your own? You claim to be on your 5th boat ... did you sail any of the others? I just don't get your entire presentation. Do you feel you are more clever than the rest? Cuz pardner, I don't think that's true.

You've made a dumb choice in tenders. You have no experience in towing a dink, you sail in a really tough area to even consider towing a dink. Please explain to me where you are the clever guy in this conversation. Thanks in advance.
 

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Having slept on my previous post, rather than offer an apology, I would now like to propose a new sub-forum for folks just fooling on the net around along the lines of:

Dudes, I'm sitting at work bored as **** so here's a coupla goofy ideas I've had. I don't really care whacha think cuz I'm just fooling around so like don't take this seriously.

With that kind of truth-in-advertising, genuinely helpful and knowledgeable people wouldn't bother to respond. And attention-getters could have their little 5 minutes in the sunshine.

Win-win.
 

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Ill play devils advocate here, yes I do beleive a lot if us are bored and or ARE not sailing due to whatever circumstances so sometimes we get cranky and post non stop on the nets...

having said that I do agree with many of your thoughts, but also understand that there is no point in making someone else feel dumb.

a lot of us get carried away and sometimes people get offended, we just had this happen on another thread where the op felt unwelcomed. I too have felt that sometimes so lets just be nicer.

now back to the RIB question...

I agree, too big, unsafe in bad weather, not smart to have it towed 100% of the time, BUT its the ops want and desire to do so with what he has so let him have at it and learn along the way.

cheers
 
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Having slept on my previous post, rather than offer an apology, I would now like to propose a new sub-forum for folks just fooling on the net around along the lines of:

Dudes, I'm sitting at work bored as **** so here's a coupla goofy ideas I've had. I don't really care whacha think cuz I'm just fooling around so like don't take this seriously.

With that kind of truth-in-advertising, genuinely helpful and knowledgeable people wouldn't bother to respond. And attention-getters could have their little 5 minutes in the sunshine.

Win-win.
there are many threads with that title, you just have to read between the lines...:D
 

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We tow the dinghy on a single line a boat length or so back, trying to keep it on the front side of the first wave back. I'll leave the outboard on in calm weather and for short tows otherwise the engine goes on a pushpit bracket.
Bingo! We adjust the dinghy multiple times per day so it is always surfing the stern wave. It makes a HUGE difference in limiting drag. Course if we want no drag it goes in the davits,, if calm, or on deck if rough...

I see boats I know that have $4000.00 invested in a prop and 10k in a fair bottom yet they are towing the dinghy UP a stern wave... I simply don't get it..... D'oh.....:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
What did I wake up to? I dont know how I'm playing referee, if so it's only because this is my post and if you don't think it has any value, don't read it. Definitely don't respond. I wanted to know how others towed a rib. I didn't ask for people to interject their opinions about te superiority of rowing, or rowing vs motoring. This can turn into whatever, it's a discussion. But when people start bickering at each other it's fair for me to nudge them to stop.

If someone posted what is the best rowing dink, would they want me to respond repeatedly about how much better an inflatable was? I don't. I just pass those threads by.

I ask like one question a week. That's not that much. I'm not bored at work. I'm towing my dinghy today. Get out of here anyways, did you have a single thing to add besides complaining about me?
 

· Courtney the Dancer
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Got a request to post this here from another thread (about bilge pumps). Lots of suggestions in this thread but no one has mentioned the number one reason not to tow your dinghy if at all possible - you will eventually (at the worst possible time) wrap the line in the prop/rudder/skeg etc. Floating lines reduce (not eliminate) the hazard, but it's just a question of when, not if. I've towed a dink a lot and had several close calls, then got a boat with davits.

Yesterday (6-22-14) a sailboat at the fuel dock here on the island wrapped it's dinghy painter in the prop when they were leaving. They got towed back to the dock and my son (runs the store at the marina) offered to dive to unwrap the prop for them. He got it off, really wrapped hard, there were several loud bangs as he removed the coils and he could see the prop shaft move forward a bit. When he got back on the dock and told them about the shaft moving they checked the bilge and discovered they were taking on a LOT of water. My son quickly got his gear back on after sending someone to get the electric pump (and run almost 200' of extension cord to the dock) and someone else to get a towel and large plastic bag to stuff in between the hull and the shaft. He got the water slowed down but without the electric pump the boat would have gone down as the two 12v bilge pumps didn't make any headway at all. The boat was hooked up to the pump all night in the marina (towed in) and the electric pump was coming on every few seconds. Doubt they got much sleep. Vessel assist is towing them somewhere today. Not sure what the cause was (I wasn't here) but I'm guessing the ceraminc disc on the dripless shaft seal might have been broken by the compression somehow, but I don't know. It was a Beneteau about 32-35'.
 

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and bingo was his name oh...

guys while the advice is awesome and true.

the OP doesnt have a prop shaft...but still a rudder...some are easy to unwrap some are hellish!

so thats 1 point in northoceans favour...jejeje(playing devils advocate here for both sides now! jajaja)

sometimes its important to pay attention to the particulars of ones request or thread title...

while I wholhearteadly agree that if me I would not tow such a big dinghy, on a small 26 footer I also give importance to the details here....

ocean clearly stated(midway through the thread) he would only tow in island hopping situations...that took 95% of my worries from his situation

however like mentioed earlier by many of us its that 5% possibilty that makes it still unwise...

at least for me...

however peeps PAY ATTENTION to the particulars of what the OPS of threads are asking.
 

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We don't tow our dink, ever, never, no way, no how. no davits either. It goes on deck. I don't know the best way, no way works best for me.
After 35+ years and tens of thousands of miles of towing dinghies, both hard and soft, never a single issue, not even a wrapped painter. Every time we anchor or stop I simply reach over a "short rope" the dinghy. It is like a third sense and just happens automatically. You get used to it...

Like anything related to sailing it is:

How
What
When
Where

The vast majority of boats in the Northeast tow dinghies but it all comes down to how, what, when & where you are.... You just have to tap into the old noggin every now and then and not be unwise about the how, what, when & where..

There are a lot of BEAUTIFUL places we'd never stop or have seen if we had to get a dinghy off deck or out of the davits every single time we wanted to go ashore and check something out. We will anchor sometimes 4-5 times per day and go ashore, having the dinghy ready is key... We just got back from a 244nm trip and only about 30nm of it were with the dinghy in the davits... No weather which required deck stowage and only half a day of that "needed speed" which I will use the davits for....
 

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A dinghy under tow has multiple uses, a few of which are:
Fender - coming alongside that barnacle encrusted jetty or gnarly old wharf, as you slow down, you will find that the dinghy has a tendency to get between your shiny top sides and the sharp bits. And never mind if you miss on your first approach - your trusty dinghy will drift under the dock and snag on a beam or wrap around a pile. You can then haul your boat in stern first, all the while under the admiring gaze of the shoreside throng.
Diagnostic - as you hit reverse to slow down or back into your dock, the painter will quietly wrap around the prop. It will do a great job of polishing the shaft, testing the integrity of your P strut, bearings, gearbox and engine mounts. When the engine automatically stops, you will also know that the oil pressure alarm works.
Bathing facility - for this one you need to sail in slightly choppy conditions, rain or perhaps find the wash of a passing powerboat. The dinghy will soon be half full of water. When you arrive at that exotic anchorage, just strip off add soap and you will soon be squeaky clean.
Drogue - if you are sailing a bit too fast for comfort, never mind, the dinghy will come to the rescue by flipping over and adding drag. For even more drag, make sure that you leave the outboard motor on the transom.
 

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Seriously though - and before the OP arcs up about thread drift - I do sometimes tow my small, flat bottom inflatable. It is only 6 ft long so not the most seaworthy thing. In fact its name is 'Wet Spot' for good reason.
However, by attaching one short line to the bow pad eye and running another through the two carry handles on the gunwales I can trim it to sit flat in the water at speeds up to about 5 knots. This produces far less drag than when the bow sits high, which only allows the stern to dig in and results in a lot more strain on the bow pad eye. At speeds above 5 knots towing is definitely not a good idea as it puts too much strain on it and runs the risk of either nose diving or broaching and capsizing.

Having said all that, a dinghy in the water is never totally safe. Last year when we were sitting out a 50 knot gale on a very secure mooring, even though we were obviously facing directly into the prevailing conditions, a gust picked up poor little 'Wet Spot' and inverted her. Five minutes later another gust righted her. Luckily the outboard motor was not on the transom at the time, otherwise I think it would have stayed inverted.
 
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