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How far offshore have you sailed (ON YOUR OWN BOAT)?


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Discussion Starter #1
So, how far offshore have you sailed? We discuss the topic of offshore sailing, suitable boats and all that good stuff on the topic.

So, let's get a sampling of many Sailnutters have actually been offshore on their own boats.

For me, the farthest I've been is Bermuda.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Eek!!!

I should have made the last option 25 miles or less. And I can't seem to figure a way to edit the poll. Sorry about that folks. So, if you've sailed 25 miles OR LESS from shore, please check the last option.

My bad.
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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Been over a hundred in the Gulf, but most of my offshore has been up and down from NC to the Keys on overnight hops.
 

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25 or less, mostly less
 

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Many folks have never even left the pond so to speak. In the PNW we have Puget Sound from which many sailors never leave. For me it is 12-15 Nautical miles of open strait to get among the Gulf Islands or San Juans and many folks are intimidated by that. I see hundreds of sailboats out in English Bay in the summer and often wonder how many of them actually leave the pond and cross the strait. Start a coastal poll for those who never have or never will go offshore and see what activity that generates. I wonder how many have never gone beyond the Chesapeake?
 

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Aught miles for me. Stricktly a Chesapeake Bay sailor. I'll get off shore soon enough, plenty of my friends have, but when I do...it won't be thousands of miles I suspect. Just into the Carribean.
 

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I’ve been close to the Northern Hemisphere’s Point Nemo in route to Kaneohe from San Francisco on a Nordic 44 (approx 1,100 NM). On the family Catalina, we’ve been 30 NM from dry land, as travel in California usually follows the coastline and is within our insurance policy coverage area. Besides, after a hundred miles or so, the view is pretty much the same.


 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Bah humbug......own boat eh ? damn....that's less than 50nms off shore cos all our sailing in the Womboat has been coastal. Can present more impressive figures as crew but but but......

It is, it must be said a very special feeling to be out there with no land in sight in any direction. Going on deck at first light to be surrounded by nothing but ocean is a simply wonderful experience.

btw....when we went the furthest offshore we have been in the old girl it was purely for the heck of it. Unless you wish to strike out for another country most of a circumnavigation of Australia would be done within 25nms of the coast..... Bass Strait, Great Australian Bight and Gulf of Carpentaria being the main exceptions.
 

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Besides, after a hundred miles or so, the view is pretty much the same.
That's kinda how we view it, and, if ya head for any of the islands, half way there your within 25m of some kinda land
 

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Aeolus II
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Most of my sailing has been on the sheltered waters of The Chesapeake Bay. I have sailed an earlier boat a few miles off shore in Florida but that was long ago. So, I would say 0 with a tiny exception.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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So far we've been about 75nm offshore on our way from Charleston to Vero Beach. Unfortunately, we hit the Gulf Stream, so we wasted 3/4 of a day coming back in closer. On Monday we head off to the Bahamas...
 

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Sailing from St Johns to Turtle Cove on the Caicos Island if I remember corectly we were at one point just over 100 miles of shore.
 

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I'm in the "Naught" Club and don't see breaking into anything beyond the "25 or less Club" in the near future.
 

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What exactly constitutes "offshore"? Out of sight of land? For 100 miles, does one sail perpendicular to the coast for 50 miles out, and then 50 miles back? Do you start measuring only when the shore drops over the horizon? Most of our cruises, or races, though they may go hundreds of miles, are along the coast - within sight of land, so I don't consider them offshore, even if we cover long stretches and sail overnight. On things like the Chicago-Mac race, you can only be out of sight of land for so long. Does that count?

The other big problem I have with this survey is having to be on your own boat. The OPBC - Other People's Boat Club - is a fine, upstanding institution, well worthy of consideration in any effort to document sailing participation, efforts, or experience. I have probably sailed more than 6,000 miles offshore, but on other people's boats.
 

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Sailed from fort pierce to the chesapeake and we were 150 miles from land at one point. Most of the time 50 miles or less
 

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It is, it must be said a very special feeling to be out there with no land in sight in any direction. Going on deck at first light to be surrounded by nothing but ocean is a simply wonderful experience.
I have never been offshore in any boat, although it seems like it will be exhilarating when I experience it for the first time.
It even looms in my mind as kind of spooky and scary being out there with no land in sight on a small craft. :eek:
 

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... a logical conclusion
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Every year the Bluewater Cruising Association holds its annual VICE (Vancouver Island Cruising Experience), in which a number of boats assemble off the west coast of Vancouver Island and sail straight out into the Pacific for three days, then turn around and head back in. The intention is to give the skippers and crew a real-time look at how they and their boats handle an offshore experience.

So far this year we have sixteen boats planning on sailing out from Ucluelet in the first good weather window after the 5th of July. If you are interested in joining us, or in joining the Bluewater Cruising Association, look at: Bluewater Cruising Association, Vancouver, BC, Canada

Generally in early July the prevailing winds are NW around 12-15 knots, so it is not unusual for most boats to make it 450 miles and some 600 or more before turning around.
 
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