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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,
We are in the process of purchasing our sailboat in Florida and plan to bring her to North Carolina where we live now. We plan to launch her in about 2 years after we do some work on her. She had taken on some water due to bilge pump failure and the water had reached a level above the sole. She has dried out inside now but is still in the slip waiting for us to have her pulled out in about three weeks. At that time we will be able to see the condition of her bottom. We live in northwest North Carolina (away from the coast etc.)
She is a 1959 Block Island 40 and we have arranged to have her transported to our location where we could keep her on our property to work on her. We are concerned about the weather that we have here in the winter. ( It can reach temperatures as low as 5 to 10 degrees below zero). How long should we keep her on the hard in Florida to allow her to dry out before we bring her to North Carolina ? My concern is the fact that she was wet inside and will probably have blisters outside as well, to deal with. I wouldn't want any moisture to freeze and cause separation or de-lamination issues. Should we leave her on the hard in Florida until next Spring?
thank you
Dale & Lori
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you smurphny,

That makes me feel better. I will be hauling her out in a few weeks and will get a better look at her hull. Sending a diver down a week before to clean her bottom before we pull her.
Here are some images of the repairs that were done a few years ago to the topside. Yes she is balsa core so I will be looking for more issues, but she looks pretty good now. Feels solid with no soft spots but some indications of leakage through very small spots on the deck. Overall she cleaned up really well last month when we spent a few days bringing her back to life.
thanks,
Dale & Lori
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you HelloSailor

I agree that it would be better to have her close by and hope that we can go
with that plan. If I can get her here by the end of August that will give us about 3 months before winter. Also I have power so I can keep her heated inside and shouldn't have any issue with freezing like I originally thought would be a problem. You're right about the mildew in Florida, she had already started having a problem when we went to look at her last month. A good cleaning that took about 3 days work took care of the mildew, but I don't want it to come back if we leave her in Florida over the winter.

thanks,
Dale & Lori
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hi Scott,

my same question when I was working out the details to have her transported.
I haven't seen her hull yet but know that she will be covered with barnacles due to the area that she is located in southern Florida. (the attached photo is of another boat that shows the possibility when boats are left unattended.
We also have to motor her 4 hours away and through a lock to the yard that will pull her for us. They recommend having the hull cleaned so that the belly straps won't crush the barnacles into the fiberglas hull or possibly damage their straps. The cleaning will also help with the 4 hour trip to the yard. Just can't wait to get her out of the water for the next step to bring her home.

thanks,
Dale
 

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