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Some one suggested in another thread it would be fun to start a thread on how long it takes you to get under way. I thought this sounded like fun because it impacts how much you sail, or it does me any way. I have owned a bunch of boats, so I will list a few different experiences.

From fastest to get underway to slowest.

Living aboard my Grampian 30 was by far the fastest. The boat was pretty stripped down for a live aboard. Dinghy was a 14 ft canoe. She was pretty much always ready to go. Clear off the table, turn the key, slip the lines. 10 minutes. Another 5 minutes to open water and the sails were going up. It was quick enough that I sailed to the beer store because it was easier than getting my motorcycle out of the underground lot.

Second fastest. My car toppable sailing kayak. 10-15 minutes to load it on roof. 5 minute drive to the water. 15 minutes to set it up. Sailing in about 30-35 minutes.

Third fastest. 21 ft trialer sailer. 15 minutes to hitch up. An hour drive to suitable sailing. 30-40 min to rig it and park car. I gave up on internal combustion engines on boats, so I sail her away from dock. Just shy of 2 hours.

Slowest. Slip 2 hours away for a 35 ft boat. Say 2 hours to drive. Half an hour to get everything ready. Then a 40 minute motor to decent sailing. Over 3 hours.
 

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The drive to time is a big factor.

When I lived in Manhattan it was 2+ hrs to where I moored the boat... but I didn't do day sails.. only long weekend.

Last period I moved and the mooring moved and it became an hr + drive... and then there was the parking time variable.

Leaving my door with all stuff ready it would be 2 hrs before I step foot on the boat and if I wanted to leave immediately... it would be another half an hr.... so day sails don't make much sense.

I don't see this time as a bad thing... it's a transition from one living state to another. Much worse leaving than when going to the boat.

These time "studies" reveal that day sailing is not happening for me... and that the mooring location is most informed by the sailing conditions and destination access than proximity to where I live.
 

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Old soul
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Interesting question, but really hard to generalize. Even with my current boat, it really depends on a set of changing circumstances as to how long it takes to get underway.

Since I live on my boat (during the warm months), we don't have to drive there. But depending on how long we've been stationary, and what we've been doing on the boat (projects, entertaining, just living, etc.) it might take anywhere from minutes to days to get the boat ready to move.

When we're on the move our normal pattern has us getting underway in about 45 to 90 minutes. This includes getting everything put away and properly stowed, doing all our normal engine and rigging checks, getting the dinghy up, and hauling in the anchor. This, of course, is the leisurely pace of a cruiser. When the need arises, we move a lot faster ;).

Probably takes us a little less time to get off the dock, but not a lot less. Again, this assumes we're in no rush.

Either way, the boat is always rigged to sail (and to motor) during the season.
 

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I can get going in a couple of minutes. As an ex-pilot I have a checklist:

Weather checked (online if possible, NAVTEX, SSB WeatherFax reports, Mark IV "eyeball")
Hatches Closed
Heads flushed and closed
Engine oil checked
Dishes either washed and stowed or secured in sinks
Instruments on (AIS is always on)
Anchor light off
VHF on, handheld on and in cockpit
Wheel lock off
Swim platform up
Ensign displayed
Dinghy line close to boat
Day Shape removed
Boom lock removed
Genoa and mainsail lines uncoiled and ready
Check for genoa cars full forward

Then I fire up the engine (check for cooling water flow) and weigh anchor and am off. This takes less than 10 minutes but I do look at my checklist despite having a routine - just to make sure I've not missed something like the dishes which can go "CRASH" once the boat is sailing and heeled over...
 

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Less than 10 minutes to be underway with 1 month at sea capacity. And I've done it!

2 Motivators: Army training and Indonesian Tsunami

Indonesian Tsunami: Boats that got underway instantly from the warning were all out in deep water by the time the tsunami hit. Those that couldn't/didnt all sank/destroyed etc.

Army: in a tactical setting (ie somewhere near the enemy, or under their air cover) all vehicles are parked back in, ready to roll straight forward and out onto their pre-arranged escape route. All vehichles are fuled immedietly they arrive, not before departure .

When my boat arrives at any port I fill with fuel, water.
The boat always has 1 months emergency provisions on board (OK right at the moment it doesnt. I have about 2 weeks worth. but I am wintering at a marina). Emergency water always on board.

At anchor keys are always in the ignition except at night, when I am on board.

My boat is absolutely ready to go now. Right NOW. (OK, not *right* now as I am inside a lock... but you know what I mean :) )

If ever the engine isn't working due to being serviced or stuffed (not often) I am really on edge until our readiness is back to instant.

Its a great feeling to be ready.
 

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...At anchor keys are always in the ignition except at night, when I am on board...
I second your preparedness bit. But I have to admit that I never remove my engine key. When aboard I don't worry about the engine, and when I go ashore I'd like to think that if I do drag anchor someone might be able to board and get my engine running to fend off disaster. I've boarded 2 drifting boats (one in the BVI, one in Deshaies) that fortunately had keys in the ignition so that I could save them from drifting onto the rocks and another boat, respectively.
 

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Lol - as a British flagged boat, I have to remove the ensign at sunset and put it back up at sunrise. I'm pretty good at the sunset part, but I am not that good with the sunrise part so I've added that to my list. The U.K. rules also specify that the ensign is to be removed when offshore and with no other other vessel in sight (Flags used to be very expensive to make, so any opportunity to reduce the wear-and-tear was used to extend their life). I once passed by Montserrat and was hailed on the radio by a patrol boat that I'd not seen and asked in a brusque manner what country my boat was flagged in. Seconds later I had the ensign displayed and the officer on the radio was (just a bit) more polite when I got the usual questions about number of people on board, port of departure and destination, etc.
 

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It is a fun life, but that doesn't obviate any need to be prepared and methodical. In my checklist most of the items are taken care of long before (the dishes I do the night before, unless I'm too drunk or full. The weather is checked upon arrival for the next day, the genoa tracks are pulled forward as part of coiling the lines). But it can be embarrassing to be sailing with the dayshape for "I'm anchored" still displayed or trying to unfurl the mainsail with the boom tied securely to port or starboard. Checking the oil can be skipped in a crunch, but if that check is part of a standard checklist you'll never hear that oil pressure alarm go off. And shortening the dinghy line before engaging the gear is matter of safety. I've only forgotten that step once but fortunately the line-cutter on the prop shaft took care of that... although it took me a long time to get the dinghy re-attached.

p.s. I just noticed that the proponents of being really prepared, Mark and I, are both singlehanders; perhaps it is more important for us to think out things ahead of time since once the SHTF we are in much bigger trouble than a vessel with more people aboard.
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Remember, this is supposed to be a fun life, not a military maneuver.
As an expedition racer, there are certain elements of getting under way that I do train for. Beach launching for example is something worth having down.

I am definitely a lot slower with the kids though lol.

:ship-captain:
 

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Geeze, reading this, you guys make me feel exhausted.

Yes, if we have to, we can underway in minutes. But that's not the norm for this cruiser. Remember, this is supposed to be a fun life, not a military maneuver.
Of course.

But I have always found the "ready to go" approach much more relaxing. When things go wrong, or even if the forecast changes or the family decides to move on, I know that everything will work, and that I've got beer or whatever without thinking about it, and I can throw off the lines in a few minutes.
 

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If dinghy is stowed and jugs are tied down, its <5 min.
Sink gets filled with any bottles on counter, switches flipped, engine started, anchor lifted.

<30 min if getting dink and motor aboard, securing lifelines, securing jugs
 

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Remember, this is supposed to be a fun life, not a military maneuver.
Yeah,... OK heres an example...

Someone who cruises weekends through summers is worried about their anchor is going to drag. Reasonable? Yes.

But I have been at anchor for 12 years in every different holding possible. I *know* I am not going to drag. I also have learned that theres as many times the anchor drags as I might have to escape because of some serious circumstance: Storm putting you on a Lee; Tanks rolling down the street (yep, it nearly happened - I said the the GF "if we see tanks rolling down the street..." I thought what the @#$% am I doing here if I could seriously think it could happen!); Police deciding you need to go NOW (yep, that happened - twice).

So, its only a military manoeuvre the first time you fuel up before you go the the bar and relax. Then its just 'normal'.
Its only sensible to plot your emergency course out as soon as you drop anchor, before you go to the bar to relax, isnt it?
 

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Old soul
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Yeah,... OK heres an example...

Someone who cruises weekends through summers is worried about their anchor is going to drag. Reasonable? Yes.

But I have been at anchor for 12 years in every different holding possible. I *know* I am not going to drag. I also have learned that theres as many times the anchor drags as I might have to escape because of some serious circumstance: Storm putting you on a Lee; Tanks rolling down the street (yep, it nearly happened - I said the the GF "if we see tanks rolling down the street..." I thought what the @#$% am I doing here if I could seriously think it could happen!); Police deciding you need to go NOW (yep, that happened - twice).

So, its only a military manoeuvre the first time you fuel up before you go the the bar and relax. Then its just 'normal'.
Its only sensible to plot your emergency course out as soon as you drop anchor, before you go to the bar to relax, isnt it?
Uhmm... sure? Planning is part of this life. But this is where you and I differ (one of many ways I suspect ;))... I wouldn't be in a place where tanks might start rolling down the street. Much like a hurricane, these kinds of events don't just appear out of no where. Call me a chicken, but I'd be far away from places well before the tanks are moving.

Weather issues are far more common, and of course I can be underway very quickly if need be. The point is, that's not the norm. We've done this enough that we have a pretty good routine for getting going. No official checklist, but things get mentally checked off.

And for the record, once my anchor is set, I have never yet dragged. And I do anchor a lot, and in what most would consider pretty challenging areas.

I just think some of you guys need to slow down and smell the roses. Life's not a race. The world isn't going anywhere. Chill man, and have another margarita.
 

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From my standpoint, as an ex-single handed sailor, I could be underway from an anchorage in the time it took to raise the anchor - usually under 5 minutes.

From the dock, about the same, 5 minutes.

I always carried a weeks or more in provisions on the boat at all times, so that was never a problem. When I came to a stop for the night, as soon as the engine was shut down, the oil and other fluids were checked and refilled if necessary.

I have a friend that cannot get underway in under an hour though. And, when he gets back to the dock, it takes him an hour to close all the through hull fittings and butting the boat up, by which time I have already driven 30 miles to home and cooked a couple steaks on the gas grill.

My wife says I'm too damned organized, but of course, I have spend most of my married life waiting for her. Kinda like herding cats. ;)

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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About 15 minutes to remove covers and open seacock, about 2 minutes to open seacock if the tsunami sirens are going off.
Fun story, middle of the night while I was 90 miles away in the mountains got a call from the nice young couple who'd bought my previous boat. "There's been a earthquake in Japan and a tsunami warning has been issued, what should we do ?" "Best would be leave the harbor and get out at least a mile and 3 would be better. However, every tsunami warning we've had so far has ended up being a Non-Event" I said. "so it'll probably be nothing."
At 5 am I nearly choked on my coffee as news reports from up north showed docks and boats breaking free in the surge. By the time I got to the harbor it was roadblocked off and all I could do is stand on the cliff and watch as the harbor channels turned into white water rivers surging in and out.
 

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It depends. Most times, if I don't plan to sail for a week or longer, I store the boat with the map plotter down below and the jib off the headstay. So if I need to rig the jib and chart plotter, it can take around a half hour to get under way, but if I have the boat normally rigged in the slip it's scarily fast to get under way. Walk out the door of my house, walk down the steps to the dock, remove the hatch slides, pull off the mainsail cover, hook up the main halyard, untie the lines and shove the boat out into Creek, raise the mainsail and I am under way. I don't know how long that takes but it is probably more than five minutes and less than ten.
 
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