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At the very least, wait until the Harbormasters of Baltimore and Norfolk open the ports back up and allow large ships in. They only do that when they are sure they can get a ship from the open ocean all the way to a pier. Then you have reasonable assurance the worst of the crap is out of the channels and areas close by. I wouldn't go gunkholing for a month. Stuff can take that long to wash down from the streams.

It might take a few weeks at least for storm- and flood-related debris to get washed down Bay. Keep in mind, also, that at some point Conowingo Dam in the Susquehanna River might have to do a release to get rid of crap.
 

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If your boat can't hit a log or floating debris (logs, trees, etc) without being in danger of being holed and sinking, then you need to buy a new boat. The trouble with the typical "bay boat" is that many are not really sea worthy. They are constructed for typical bay weather...light, thin hulls, light rigging (masts, etc), relatively low displacement, etc, and when ocean type conditions arrive, they fall apart. We like to go out in 20-30 knot conditions in our fast, but relatively bullet proof 60's fiberglass boat, and I wouldn't let a floating log intimidate me. Check out a recent trip last Mother's Day: Varsity Sailing - YouTube
Oh, it isn't about holing the hull. At sailboat speeds that sort of damage is an unlikely prospect. But trees, tarps, ropes and other such debris tangling with your keel, rudder, and propeller can make your life miserable and can completely remove your ability to maneuver or even move the boat. Disentanglement can be surprisingly difficult.

DaCAP
 
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