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I'd like to add that there even some older men who fit that criteria. I'd like to consider myself in that group. My 'amazment' comes from seeing so few women climbing out of the 'traditional' box they cling to for security (??) No one said it's easy but kudos for trying and applause for succeeding and that's not gender orientated. Men too could use some self evaluation (I know ,cries of 'blasphemy'.
 

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Some don't mind being called "Admiral"..
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7/1/2014 - Present
ADMIRAL MICHELLE HOWARD


Admiral Howard is a 1978 graduate of Gateway High School in Aurora, Colorado. She graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1982 and from the Army’s Command and General Staff College in 1998, with a Masters in Military Arts and Sciences.


Howard’s initial sea tours were aboard USS Hunley (AS 31) and USS Lexington (AVT 16). While serving on board Lexington, she received the secretary of the Navy/Navy League Captain Winifred Collins award in May 1987. This award is given to one woman officer a year for outstanding leadership. She reported to USS Mount Hood (AE 29) as chief engineer in 1990 and served in Operations Desert Shield and Desert Storm. She assumed duties as first lieutenant on board the USS Flint (AE 32) in July 1992. In January 1996, she became the executive officer of USS Tortuga (LSD 46) and deployed to the Adriatic in support of Operation Joint Endeavor, a peacekeeping effort in the former Republic of Yugoslavia. Sixty days after returning from the Mediterranean deployment, Tortuga departed on a West African training cruise, where the ship’s Sailors, with embarked Marines and U.S. Coast Guard detachment, operated with the naval services of seven African nations.


She took command of USS Rushmore (LSD 47) on March 12, 1999, becoming the first African American woman to command a ship in the U.S. Navy. Howard was the commander of Amphibious Squadron Seven from May 2004 to September 2005. Deploying with Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) 5, operations included tsunami relief efforts in Indonesia and maritime security operations in the North Arabian Gulf. She commanded Expeditionary Strike Group Two from April 2009 to July 2010. In 2009, she deployed to CENTCOM theater, where she commanded Task Force 151, Multi-national Counter-piracy effort, and Task Force 51, Expeditionary Forces. In 2010, she was the Maritime Task Force commander for BALTOPS, under 6th Fleet.


Her shore assignments include: J-3, Global Operations, Readiness and executive assistant to the Joint Staff director of Operations; deputy director N3 on the OPNAV staff; deputy director, Expeditionary Warfare Division, OPNAV staff; senior military assistant to the secretary of the Navy; Chief of Staff to the director for Strategic Plans and Policy, J-5, Joint Staff, deputy commander, US Fleet Forces Command, and Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Operations, Plans & Strategy (N3/N5). She currently serves as the 38th Vice Chief of Naval Operations.
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...and my duly respect to her accomplishments..
A black, female Admiral in the U.S. Navy :cool: Growing up in the 60's I never thought I'd live to see something like that, let alone a black POTUS (even if he is only male. ;))

Phenomenal change in societal attitudes within 1/2 a lifetime.

P.S. "Military Arts"? :confused:
 

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Still.. whenever a male is on board a women owned/operated boat, anyone not knowing that, will ALWAYS defer to the male as the "Captain" The times when my son and I were on the Chesapeake anyone looking on would just assume my son was. He and I would just exchange glances and smile. I'd say "there ya go captain" take the wheel" AND pay the bills! LOL

I must say, in defense of men. Many younger men are "with it" and not "amazed" by women doing non traditional things. So.. there is hope :)
Not really the case in all cases Denise - I'm a geezer and before I "defer" to either I always feel things out to see who's in charge when a man & woman are on a boat. I've found with older and/or very experienced couples, oftentimes no-one is "in charge", any more than they are in long term marriages.

I don't think it's so much being "amazed" as it being uncommon - as I've said before, women in command of their own boats are still pretty unusual. There are about 800 boats in my marina and I've yet to see a woman taking a boat out, either alone or "in charge".

Lots of us would like to see a lot more of it.
 

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gents thank you for the input.. It's not personal, just general. I'm sure all the guys here on SN are "with it" ! even SJB :)
 

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Still.. whenever a male is on board a women owned/operated boat, anyone not knowing that, will ALWAYS defer to the male as the "Captain" The times when my son and I were on the Chesapeake anyone looking on would just assume my son was. He and I would just exchange glances and smile. I'd say "there ya go captain" take the wheel" AND pay the bills! LOL

I must say, in defense of men. Many younger men are "with it" and not "amazed" by women doing non traditional things. So.. there is hope :)
Women I know who own their own boats, often have this problem with male crews, who assume the role of Captain, despite knowing far less than the owner, in fact, almost nothing about boats, compared to the owner.
Young women don't put up with a fraction of the crap that women used to.
 

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gents thank you for the input.. It's not personal, just general. I'm sure all the guys here on SN are "with it" ! even SJB :)
Hey I like strong women who go after what they want. That is what I helped raise two daughters to do. And they are off doing there things. I have no trouble sharing responsibilities with strong women.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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Women I know who own their own boats, often have this problem with male crews, who assume the role of Captain, despite knowing far less than the owner, in fact, almost nothing about boats, compared to the owner.
Young women don't put up with a fraction of the crap that women used to.


and this is why i sit on dock or at anchor for 2 weeks or how ever long it takes to have the real personality appear....rodlmffao.. no one gets into my boat and sails away immediately. i have to get to know the quirks and weirdnesses first....lol
 

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The quirks and weirdness you musteve seen! ha! Good book book for a few million peso's.
 
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At the risk of resurrecting an old post, but one which I've enjoyed reading again over the years, I would like to make an observation and see if I can get consensus because I will be the keynote speaker at a women's sailing event at my club in a few weeks. I have been trying to find demographics about the number of women sailors out there and how many (married or single) own their boat. What I have found is that there are about 16 million boats, though only 12 million of which are registered, and about 87.3 million adults who participate in recreational boating. Of these totals, 1.5 million (~9%) are sailboats and a survey from the Northeast found 90% of recreational boating participants are male. So the best estimates I can come up with is that 8.7 million women in the U.S. participate in some form of recreational boating, with almost 800,000 involved in sailing. If this thread is any indication, then somewhere between 10 and 15% of sailboat owners are female, which is around 150,000 to 225,000 women. Would anyone care to give some feedback on my assumptions here?

Any other interesting tidbits that might be useful for my presentation would also be appreciated. Its theme is about overcoming fear and achieving your goals, which in this case is skippering one's own boat, whether they own it or not, or whether they're partnered or not.

Thanks!
 

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...

Any other interesting tidbits that might be useful for my presentation would also be appreciated. Its theme is about overcoming fear and achieving your goals, which in this case is skippering one's own boat, whether they own it or not, or whether they're partnered or not.

Thanks!
I overcome my fear (yes. still have it) by not worrying at the moment what others think of me. Everyone was a beginner once. If they can't remember what that felt like then so be it. Focus on the job at hand and move on.

Best of luck with your presentation!
 
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Wow - that's as close to free as makes no difference - for a pirate ship in paradise.

Well done.
 

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This will be a quick reply, I'll reply again when I have more time to offer a thoughtful response. LOVE all the data you present, and also that you bring it with the disclaimer suggesting the difficulty in getting accurate data. That said, one criteria not mentioned was those boats that are owned jointly among partners, married or not; but who might register the boat, for "convenience," arguably in the man's name. I think that skews the data.
Also, what I see among couples is the division of labor which is a consideration. I won't offer examples right now, because different couples divide the activities involved in sailing differently. Our yacht club only opened up membership to women about 15 years ago, and we had our first woman commodore 13 years ago. It would be interesting to survey yacht clubs regarding the number of members who are women who "own" or skipper their own boats,
My husband's mother purchased and sailed her own boat in about 1965.
I think it's much more common than might be assumed.
Cande
 

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... That said, one criteria not mentioned was those boats that are owned jointly among partners, married or not; but who might register the boat, for "convenience," arguably in the man's name. I think that skews the data.
This is a good point. Our boat is jointly owned by me and my partner. She is as much the owner, master and captain as I.
 
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