SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a 1985 Catalina 22. I recently purchased a CDI FF2 furling system. It requires that I purchase 5/16 or 3/8 Dacron for a furling line. To lead the line from the drum aft to the cockpit, any estimate on how much I would need? I'm going to have to buy it online, so I don't want to order it only to come up a few feet short. I'm assuming 50 feet should do it.

Second question: I already have an anchor line running from the bow to the cockpit on the starboard side, so the furling line will need to be run on the port side. Would this affect whether or not I set up the furler to be clockwise vs counterclockwise, or would it make any difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
50 will be plenty
Proper lead to the furler drum is very important
Sorry, I'm very new to this. When you say proper lead to the drum, what are some things I need to make sure I do/don't do? Does it have to do with how blocks are set up to guide the line aft?

After you replied, I added another piece of info that the furler line will need to be run on the port side.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,930 Posts
you need the lline to be:

distance from drum to cockpit.... or winch you will use + length of foot of sail / 3 x drum diameter in feet+ 3'

example:

distance of furler to to winch = 20'
length of foot of sail = 12'
diameter of drum .25' (3")

20' + 12' / (3 x .25') + 3' = 26'

Harken says:
line should be equal to the length of the boat plus the length of the foot of the largest genoa plus 6'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,716 Posts
SanderO describes the length well.

Proper lead means that the lead to the drum from the end block leading to it needs to be in the plane of the furler drum and not leading up or down to it. The installation instructions should describe this.

3/8" line sounds large. Larger diameter lines fill up the drum quicker and you might not have enough room. The installation manual should suggest the optimum diameter. One thing we do for our furler line is use a single braid line that the cover can be stripped from. We strip the cover for the run to the furler, leaving just the cover needed for us to handle and cleat the line. This is probably overkill for your furler, but if you need room on the drum it is an option.

Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,591 Posts
I had that same furler on my Oday 23. 5/16" is plenty big. I think I may have even replaced the original line with 1/4" line at some point. To run the line back to the cockpit, I used three blocks; one that affixed to the the pulpit, directing the line to run off the furler drum at a right angle to the forestay angle, then two blocks affixed to the two stanchions on the side where the line will run. If I recall, the three pieces were sold together as a kit. Don't forget to attach a place to affix the end of the furling line. For a few years, I used a spare cleat that I had screwed into the outer side of the cockpit coaming. Later, I upgraded to a swivel cleat attached to a piece of starboard and that to a stanchion. Made things a lot easier. Garhauer also makes a ready-made option like that.


The side of the boat where you run the line is irrelevant to whether you furl clockwise or counterclockwise. You choose the direction of the furling by which side of the jib has the sacrificial UV material. The sail has to furl such that that material is on the outside of the furled sail. It is easy to make this mistake. Do not ask me how I know this.

I give the CDI two thumbs up. I've come across some guys that look down on it as a cheap unit, but it worked flawlessly for me for over 15 years. And their customer service was nothing short of excellent. I called them once with a question, and I got the chief designer/president/founder on the line. He not only answered my question, he sent me some free parts.

As for raising the sail, I highly recommend not trying to hand the very thin halyard they give you. After trying it only once, I attached a bigger, easier to handle line to hoist the sail. I also recommend investing in a can of Sail Kote silicone lube. Makes hoisting the sail much easier.
20150530_141440.jpg
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,380 Posts
Sorry, I'm very new to this. When you say proper lead to the drum, what are some things I need to make sure I do/don't do? Does it have to do with how blocks are set up to guide the line aft?

After you replied, I added another piece of info that the furler line will need to be run on the port side.
See that it winds correctly, not riding up on one side of the drum.
You should be able to adjust the lead, block, whatever..right before the drum...positioning the line
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
you need the lline to be:

distance from drum to ****pit.... or winch you will use + length of foot of sail / 3 x drum diameter in feet+ 3'

example:

distance of furler to to winch = 20'
length of foot of sail = 12'
diameter of drum .25' (3")

20' + 12' / (3 x .25') + 3' = 26'

Harken says:
line should be equal to the length of the boat plus the length of the foot of the largest genoa plus 6'
I get 39 not 26 feet with the first method and 40 with the Harken method. Pretty close!

And I agree 3/8 is too large. It would overfill the drum. On a 22, 1/4 inch is probably fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,930 Posts
I get 39 not 26 feet with the first method and 40 with the Harken method. Pretty close!

And I agree 3/8 is too large. It would overfill the drum. On a 22, 1/4 inch is probably fine.
My bad.... my math was wrong... sorry. I sail corrected.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
I had that same furler on my Oday 23. 5/16" is plenty big. I think I may have even replaced the original line with 1/4" line at some point. To run the line back to the ****pit, I used three blocks; one that affixed to the the pulpit, directing the line to run off the furler drum at a right angle to the forestay angle, then two blocks affixed to the two stanchions on the side where the line will run. If I recall, the three pieces were sold together as a kit. Don't forget to attach a place to affix the end of the furling line. For a few years, I used a spare cleat that I had screwed into the outer side of the ****pit coaming. Later, I upgraded to a swivel cleat attached to a piece of starboard and that to a stanchion. Made things a lot easier. Garhauer also makes a ready-made option like that.


The side of the boat where you run the line is irrelevant to whether you furl clockwise or counterclockwise. You choose the direction of the furling by which side of the jib has the sacrificial UV material. The sail has to furl such that that material is on the outside of the furled sail. It is easy to make this mistake. Do not ask me how I know this.

I give the CDI two thumbs up. I've come across some guys that look down on it as a cheap unit, but it worked flawlessly for me for over 15 years. And their customer service was nothing short of excellent. I called them once with a question, and I got the chief designer/president/founder on the line. He not only answered my question, he sent me some free parts.

As for raising the sail, I highly recommend not trying to hand the very thin halyard they give you. After trying it only once, I attached a bigger, easier to handle line to hoist the sail. I also recommend investing in a can of Sail Kote silicone lube. Makes hoisting the sail much easier. View attachment 136105
Thank you! I like the look of that swivel cleat to finish it off. I was going to cleat it off to a horn cleat, but that one looks pretty sharp.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
698 Posts
I won't repeat the math already provided, but I will tell you that a few years ago I replaced my furling line using the "winging it" method of estimation. The first time I let the sail unfurl, it got most of the way out before the end of the line disappeared from my hands and ended up sitting on my foredeck well out of reach. So, I can tell you that too long is way better than too short.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
I won't repeat the math already provided, but I will tell you that a few years ago I replaced my furling line using the "winging it" method of estimation. The first time I let the sail unfurl, it got most of the way out before the end of the line disappeared from my hands and ended up sitting on my foredeck well out of reach. So, I can tell you that too long is way better than too short.
Those sound like wise words indeed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,060 Posts
Would also add enough for a good stopper knot and a significant tail. You want to be able to roll the sail up easily even if it got away from you and the line went all the way to the stopper knot. It’s good if you use spectra or dyneema or at least a very low stretch line for this purpose. I generally strip the cover off this line near its insertion on to the drum. Do that so I can always have a few turns on the drum at all times but not have so much line it totally fills the space in the drum.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,930 Posts
My calc allows for extra line and no need for a stopper knot really. Each fuller and sail and boat will determine the diameter and the length needed. I use 5/16" and it works on my winch.
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,095 Posts
... I use 5/16" and it works on my winch.
Maybe you mean "works on my furler"?

You should avoid putting your furling line on a winch, feeling the need to do so means there's a problem to resolve. Use the winch and you may break your gear.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,930 Posts
Maybe you mean "works on my furler"?

You should avoid putting your furling line on a winch, feeling the need to do so means there's a problem to resolve. Use the winch and you may break your gear.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
No I meant winch (self tailer)... The pro furl can be winched in. To get a tight roll I need some "tension" on the furler and winching it works fine. I winch in a reef as well. No problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
540 Posts
Is it best to maximize the amount of the line the drum can handle? I would think the more line you have the more torque you would get when furling as a result of the larger diameter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,648 Posts
Extra line in the drum is a good thing. You want enough to completely furl the sail plus have a couple of wraps of the sheets around it. And if the sail furls tightly like when furling on a windy day, it takes more turns of the drum and thus you need more furling line.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top