SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 44 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
New to ocean sailing, older first boat: 1980 24' C&C. Loving the boat. A week of close off-shore sailing is in the making. This will be the first voyage for the two of us.

A trial dinner-aboard-at-the-dock revealed the quantity of potable water (drinking, washing dishes and bathing) is an area due closer study. I've not ran across an overwhelming amount of information regarding provisioning of water. A water maker isn't in our future for this boat. Notwithstanding wise sounding advice received from an old salt recently to throw away our calendar, our plans include three days out, four days to come back in with one marina stop in the middle. So we're looking for up to four days of water provisioning.

Ideas? Thank you.
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
4,765 Posts
The 2 of us on out boat away from dock use 50 gal every 5-8 days depending on number of showers. I dont know if you are asking for usage or how to have water. If have, if you need more you have to carry it.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,228 Posts
In your case, washing dishes and your body are out, if you are sailing offshore. Potable water is for human consumption only!
Be sure to pick up a set of real stainless steel utensils (nonmagnetic) or they will rust and have a salt water foot pump installed at the galley sink or use a bucket and sea water to wash dishes, pots & pans and utensils.
You are going to have to get used to bathing and washing clothes in sea water. The sticky feeling will disappear in a couple of days and you won't even notice it. The plus to this is that you will not have any body odor after bathing in sea water. Find a good soap, I think Ivory did well, but the fancy stuff like Irish Spring doesn't.
I am talking from experience here; I did a 9.5 year circumnavigation back in the '70s and our fresh water was only for human consumption when offshore, even with 200 gallons of it in the tanks. If you choose to rinse in a rain squall, you can do so, but then you'll feel gritty again when you wash in salt water. Do not under any circumstances take denim to sea to be washed in salt water. It will never completely dry.
Remember, a human can go without food for about three weeks but would typically only last three to four days without water. There is a real danger if you take this too lightly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mhinnc

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,145 Posts
½ gallon of DRINKING water per person per day in temperate climates. More in the tropics.
Plan on 5 gallons of fresh water per day for everything else.

This is covered in ASA 104
 
  • Like
Reactions: mhinnc

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,382 Posts
A suggestion...
If you are new to this, try using a counter top water jug for a week....<$10 at wally
Right now you are looking for good answers
Find the ones you can before you get on the boat
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,937 Posts
If I recall correctly (unlikely) when I was in the Caribe and living aboard to 36s almost always alone... OK not always... and water cost $.10 ec/gal back then I filled the 75 gal tanks every two or three weeks. I did not scrimp on water or showers.... or washed stuff in salt water.

I did have a small 40 gal/day water maker but did not make water in any anchorages.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
My wife and I use about 5 gallons per day coastal cruising and doing short hops off shore. We bath in salt water, but do a fresh water rinse to get the salt water off. This accounts for 2 gallons total. The other 3 gallons are drinking, cooking, brushing teeth, washing hands, and rinsing salt water off clean dishes. I have a 30 gallon tank and a couple extra 5 gallon cans. While Capta’s approach is great advice for crossing oceans, you are coastal cruising and can be a little less conservative since you’ll be hitting a marina in less than 5 days. Not sure of your water tank capacity but I would get a couple extra jugs and take at least 30 gallons with you. Watch your supply and forgo the bath if you use more than you plan.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
926 Posts
You have a 24' boat, the advice being offered is coming from sailors with much bigger vessels...most people use what they have. When you are limited by space you learn to deal with it. We have been sailing on our 26' boat for many years, we have a 15 gallon fresh water tank. Wash hands with seawater, wipe dishes clean with a paper towel and then wash in an inch of fresh water. We have never had a problem bathing in the ocean, just be sure to dry off with a towel rather than let the salt water dry on you. We can easily go for 5 to 7 days. The spare water jug in the locker has never been pressed into service. RegisteredUser's advice could be helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,015 Posts
We did a 24 day passage to the Marquesas and found out about 2/3rd of the way that we couldn't get the floor boards up to change from one 40 gallon tank to the other. Spent a week in Atuona on the windward/rainy side of the island but the floorboards still stuck in place. Sailed around the Island to the dry side and it was still another week before the floor boards loosened up. 38 days on 40 gallons of water. Used freshwater to drink and cooking. Used salt water for everything else. Didn't make any effort to conserve just used the water that was abundantly available and passing showers for other than drinking. Lived for a year that way and didn't miss profligate fresh water usage.
 

·
Old soul
Joined
·
4,498 Posts
Two adults, full time (for ~1/2 of each year). We use 2 gallons/day. I know because I have a flow meter on the water line.

Ours is on the low end. We achieve this by using salt water for initial washing of dishes. We use rain water for showering (no built in shower). Our composting head takes no water. And we cruise in cooler climes where constant showering, are not needed. And we probably sweat a lot less, so perhaps intake is lower.

I stress though, we don't make any special effort to conserve water while on board. We use what we want. We are just conscious not to waste it.
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,316 Posts
What no water maker on your 24 foot boat?

I think life offshore in a 24' boat with two people for 7 days with one night in a marina will be very different than dinner at the dock. I would take two 5 gallon water containers and still conserve at every opportunity, using saltwater whenever possible for dishwashing, etc, avoid long hot showers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,066 Posts
Have cruised on a 24’ Cape Dory. Currently have 46’. Two 100g tanks and take 30 g in one gallon jugs. Also have a watermaker. Doesn’t matter. Thinking is the same. You want multiple containers and sources. One is for drinking. This should be in individual containers. Flats of bottle water work great for this. Your concern is to not be discomforted if a individual container leaks or becomes contaminated.
Second is ADLs. For the trip you envision you could just miss showers and do PTA wipe downs if absolutely necessary but washing your face and brushing your teeth sure is nice. I’ve had boats all sizes to cruise. I’d store water in all the nooks and crannies but try to spread it around and keep it near the center of buoyancy. Safest and best trim that way. Pasta is nice boiled in seawater. For many other dishes you can use sea and skip added salt.
BTW they make small hand operated reverse osmosis units. They work well and aren’t that dear. Great when sailing on a small boat or adventuring.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,937 Posts
Have cruised on a 24’ Cape Dory. Currently have 46’. Two 100g tanks and take 30 g in one gallon jugs. Also have a watermaker. Doesn’t matter. Thinking is the same. You want multiple containers and sources. One is for drinking. This should be in individual containers. Flats of bottle water work great for this. Your concern is to not be discomforted if a individual container leaks or becomes contaminated.
Second is ADLs. For the trip you envision you could just miss showers and do PTA wipe downs if absolutely necessary but washing your face and brushing your teeth sure is nice. I’ve had boats all sizes to cruise. I’d store water in all the nooks and crannies but try to spread it around and keep it near the center of buoyancy. Safest and best trim that way. Pasta is nice boiled in seawater. For many other dishes you can use sea and skip added salt.
BTW they make small hand operated reverse osmosis units. They work well and aren’t that dear. Great when sailing on a small boat or adventuring.
We decided quite a long time ago not to drink or use stored tank water. The thought of using a metal container for decades which is never properly cleaned is concerning to say the least. Product water should also not be stored in ship's tanks.
We have an Culligan inline water filter for tank water at the galley which is supposed to make water potable. We do use this for boiling water for cooking... but drink from store bought bottled water we dispense from a handy dispenser... or Pelligrino which wifey likes. We cruise in LIS/Southern New England where water is free and accessible and use ours for cleaning and bathing... and fill up the tanks as needed. We still use an inline cartridge filter on the hose and add some cholox as well. Tank water has no odor but has not been tested. Water does not sit long in the tanks because we use it freely.

No biggie to buy drinking bottled drinking water and fill tanks for cleaning / bathing water.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,195 Posts
For a 1 week trip on a 24 ft boat with two, I would probably carry an extra couple of collapsible 5 gallon water jugs. They are about $10 a piece. Then add a case or two of bottled water. For reference, I find I use about 1 gallon of water per day for myself on a 21 ft boat doing dishes with sea water. Really depends on how much you consume and conserve. For example, using water to make pasta, then dumping excess water can be a big waster, on the other hand, using water to hydrate lentils, oatmeal or rice, little water is wasted.
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,145 Posts
My boat's tanks hold 66 gallons of water in 2 tanks. We use this water for cleaning dishes, hand washing, flushing (Vacuflush head uses 1 pint per flush), and I suppose that I could shower with it, but I do not drink from these 33-year old plastic tanks. In order to control the probability of getting bacteria/algae, I add a little bleach (about a cup) or powdered pool shock (about a two tablespoons) to these tanks every time that I fill them. Drinking, tooth brushing and cooking are from bottled water. I take the number of people aboard, multiply by the number of days that I plan to be away from civilization, and multiply that by 0.5 gallons.

IF I ran out of bottled water (and I never have) I could use the fresh water from the tanks.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mhinnc

·
Old soul
Joined
·
4,498 Posts
Hmmm, I guess I should add that we always drink right from our 34-year-old stainless steel boat tank. Haven't died yet ;).

We go though a shock cycle when we commission the boat each season, which means adding a higher level of chlorine (bleach) to the tank. Fill. Let run through all plumbing. Then let sit for 6-12 hrs. After that we just use water from good sources.

We have an inline filter system, which is nothing fancy. Just a physical filter (2 micron) and then a carbon filter. Water comes out clean tasting fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,066 Posts
Interesting how different peoples lives are. Now when cruising use only tank water never bottled. Think beyond ecological reasons to limit plastic use it’s a PIA to have to bring in garbage and often you pay to dump it. In the islands they commonly burn garbage adding to pollution.
If you have only RO water in your tanks there’s no possibility of growth. With stainless tanks it’s not a big deal to clean them if required. Think tank taste doesn’t come from the tanks as commonly as from the various hoses. Think if you have a watermaker and freely use water those get flushed out frequently so that’s only an issue after a layup. To avoid tank taste save some RO water at time of layup. Run watermaker at sample setting for 20 minutes. Backflush with RO water. Make water and fill tanks to around 20-30%. Run all heads, faucets, showers and run both hot and cold. Refill tanks normally. Use water a lot. Clean boat, long showers etc. then go to usual routine. Think the biggest deal with tank taste is long lay ups and little daily water use.
When lay up is up north it’s easier. 100 RV antifreeze is cidal. Kills bacteria and mold. If used undiluted at layup there’s no reason to mess with beach. You start with sterile liquid in your system. Never understood why folks don’t blow the few extra bucks for it and use 50.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,937 Posts
.... With stainless tanks it’s not a big deal to clean them if required. Think tank taste doesn’t come from the tanks as commonly as from the various hoses. ...
I have 35 yr old stainless steel tanks. There is no access port. No way to physically inspect or clean which would be one helluva job.

The way we use the boat these days bringing bottled water for consumption is not a problem. Making water in LIS IS a problem. So my conclusion a water maker for LIS and Southern NE boaters is not a good idea. Water is so readily available on docks it makes no sense to produce it with a water maker. PERIOD FULL STOP. We go to the dock for water and a washdown after a salty sail and whenever the tank reading is low.

I did replumb to the galley but not the head faucets... about maybe 5 years ago.

A watermaker (very small) is a life safety device for passage making. I had a 35gal/day capacity one when I was doing passages back and forth to the Caribbean. I made water under way. Never used it in harbors down there.. just bought it. And it takes a huge amount of water at EC$,10/gal to justify a $5-10,000 water maker. Do the math. And then shower all you want with bought water and you come out ahead I suspect.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
11,797 Posts
Use the afementioned contents pertinent to your situation.
24 ft boat....coastal sailing from NC.

Buying collapsible water containers a good thought. I would go with something like
https://www.plastimo.com/en/water-on-board/fresh-water-tanks/reservoirs-souples-pour-eau-douce-9848.html

It’s possible you have a contained are for them in a storage area below.

Second you will need to change you water usage to be more conservative.
You may have a foot pump already as you are 24 for, but if not I would instal one for fresh and one for salt water.

Coastal cruising will allow you availability to dock water. Plan your trip that way. I would also take an Amy of small bottled drinking water. A case of 24 ..20 oz lasts us 4-5 days .
 
1 - 20 of 44 Posts
Top