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Discussion Starter #1
At my beach we get some swells comming into the beach. I have two dinghy's. One is fiberglass and one is inflatable.

They both have the same problem.
Once you hit the beach the rollers come in and wash over the boat.

With the fiberglass boat I turn it around and beach it stern first because we row that one. That helps but not always.

The inflatable with the motor I have to beach nose first and then the wave will just rush over transom.

Is their anything that can be done?
 

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For ocean beaches, I use what I call a Navy Seal landing. Idle offshore a bit to get the engine cool. Click the raise-engine lever so the engine will raise itself when you hit the beach. Then follow a swell in, riding on the back of the wave. You want to zoom forward near the end, so you actually want to be further back from the back of the wave. Once the wave breaks, follow the foam and zoom forward as the foam hits the shore. Brace yourself so you don't do cartwheels and summersaults off the suddenly-stopped dinghy.

Once clear of the waves and high and dry on shore, pull the lanyard to stop the engine.

I only do 1 of these a year on average. Not sure it's good for the engine.

Regards,
Brad
 
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69' Coronado 25
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Nothing like sucking sand....

into the engine that is....
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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For ocean beaches, I use what I call a Navy Seal landing. Idle offshore a bit to get the engine cool. Click the raise-engine lever so the engine will raise itself when you hit the beach. Then follow a swell in, riding on the back of the wave. You want to zoom forward near the end, so you actually want to be further back from the back of the wave. Once the wave breaks, follow the foam and zoom forward as the foam hits the shore. Brace yourself so you don't do cartwheels and summersaults off the suddenly-stopped dinghy.

Once clear of the waves and high and dry on shore, pull the lanyard to stop the engine.

I only do 1 of these a year on average. Not sure it's good for the engine.
..or the toddler that rushes down to play in the water right in front of you as you approach the beach. ;)

:eek: :eek:
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Nothing like sucking sand....

into the engine that is....
That's one reason the way we learnt to do it as kids (no matter what type of dinghy) was:
  1. Drop the dinghy (sand, grapnel) anchor over the bow just outside the shore-break.
  2. Stop the outboard and raise it.
  3. Ease out on the anchor line keeping the bow into the waves. With a bit of practice you can time the "eases" to allow the bow to rise over the waves as you back in.
  4. Tie off the anchor line and jump out over the stern onto dry land.
This method also makes it easy to leave without getting wet - simply jump in, haul yourself into water deep enough to start the outboard and go from there.

Hope this helps :)
 

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David, I not sure I understand what you're asking.

You say that " once you hit the beach, the rollers come and wash over the boat"

So if I understand you correctly, you have no problem getting to the beach..( sand?) dry.

It's AFTER you get to the beach..the waves swamp the boat? This is long island sound yes?

Is it a steep drop off or something? Can't you just, lay off, time the sets and ride the back of one of the swells in, step out and pull the boat up on the beach?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
David, I not sure I understand what you're asking.

You say that " once you hit the beach, the rollers come and wash over the boat"

So if I understand you correctly, you have no problem getting to the beach..( sand?) dry.

It's AFTER you get to the beach..the waves swamp the boat? This is long island sound yes?

Is it a steep drop off or something? Can't you just, lay off, time the sets and ride the back of one of the swells in, step out and pull the boat up on the beach?
You are right I shut off the motor and lift it and the waves propel me to the beach just find.

I see your confusion. You aren't visualizing myself or my passengers.
We are old and creaky. Once the boat is stopped it takes several sets of swells for use to get out of the boat. By then we are all soaked.

You method would work if once the boat hit the beach we would immediately hop out. Not going to happen.:)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's one reason the way we learnt to do it as kids (no matter what type of dinghy) was:
  1. Drop the dinghy (sand, grapnel) anchor over the bow just outside the shore-break.
  2. Stop the outboard and raise it.
  3. Ease out on the anchor line keeping the bow into the waves. With a bit of practice you can time the "eases" to allow the bow to rise over the waves as you back in.
  4. Tie off the anchor line and jump out over the stern onto dry land.
This method also makes it easy to leave without getting wet - simply jump in, haul yourself into water deep enough to start the outboard and go from there.

Hope this helps :)
That sounds really nice.
I have a small maybe 5 lb mushroom would that work in sand?
How do you retrieve the anchor for the last trip of the day?
 

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That sounds really nice.
I have a small maybe 5 lb mushroom would that work in sand?
Dunno.. give it a try. :)

To be prefectly honest, whether or not it's big enough is going to depend on (a) the weight of the dinghy and occupants and (b) the size of the waves you're dealing with.. but I'd have thought it would work except in extreme conditions - yes.

How do you retrieve the anchor for the last trip of the day?
You mean if you're leaving the dinghy on the beach overnight?? You don't. Just let out enough line to allow you to drag the dinghy up above the high-tide mark, re-secure it and use your feet to bury the line in the sand so no-one'll trip over it.

Our trips were always from the boat to the shore and back again and if the last trip is back to the boat, it isn't an issue. I'd imagine that any resupply missions starting on-shore would be from a yacht club jetty with dinghy storage facilities - not a beach - wouldn't they?
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Our trips were always from the boat to the shore and back again and if the last trip is back to the boat, it isn't an issue. I'd imagine that any resupply missions starting on-shore would be from a yacht club jetty with dinghy storage facilities - not a beach - wouldn't they?
Sadly no.

My last trip is to carry the motor to the car and dinghy to the dinghy rack.

If it works only one person has to get wet.
 

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Attach a long trip line to the anchor so you can pull it to shore after the last trip.
A trip line does add complexity and potential for fouling, but, yes, it will work.

Assuming a sandy bottom, an 'un-official' alternative is:
  1. Do your last trip in as directed above
  2. Drop off all passengers, goods and the outboard at the beach - but leave the oars in the dinghy!
  3. Tie a spare line to a suitably sized rock (an old breeze-block is ideal - basically a concrete brick with big holes in it to tie a line onto) and put it in the dinghy.
  4. Pull yourself off the beach using the anchor line.
  5. Drop the rock/brick over the side, temporarily secure the line to a forward thwart and retrieve your anchor.
  6. Ease back in to the beach as before (using an oar if you need to), either dragging the rock/brick back in with you as you go or pulling it in after you land, depending on the sea conditions.
See, there are always ways to do these things.. (and that's what you learn growing up in the Whitsundays if you're the sort of kid who didn't like to get his feet wet if he didn't have to!) :cool:
 

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..or the toddler that rushes down to play in the water right in front of you as you approach the beach. ;)

:eek: :eek:
If you are even envisioning this at a crowded beach with toddlers or anyone else nearby then you're thinking wrong.

Regards,
Brad
 

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If you are even envisioning this at a crowded beach with toddlers or anyone else nearby then you're thinking wrong.
Righto.. I've see people (complete morons to be sure) do it, that's all. Plenty of times.

To be fair, they're usually also the sort of people who arrive off the beach in the most expensive (motor)yacht you've ever seen. I'm fairly sure they just don't want to get their feet wet, but they might also be wanting others to see they've arrived and think that everyone else (toddlers included) should get out of their way.

I didn't think for a second that you might be like them, Brad. :p ;) :D


(FWIW, if you tried a "Seal Landing" around here and anyone saw you you'd have the book thrown at you. Rather large fines indeed are handed out for people who do that.)
 

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Everyone is ignoring the obvious. Just wear bathing suits. Problem solved. You can all thank me later.
 
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Got to time 3:45 on this clip:

But I really think you need one of these:

More...

But for me, I think I need one of these... (skip to time 1:50)

Regards,
Brad
 

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Here's sort-of a "Navy Seal" type landing, only he has no need to do it (no waves) and he doesn't hang out offshore to let his engine cool down.

(Skip to time 0:40)


Regaards,
Brad
 
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