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old guy
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I am 64 and have never sailed on my own! The retirement plan is to explore SE Alaska and Prince William Sound. I don't have much available cash and will not have a large retirement. I plan to take a basic to bareboat in June and go sailing off the coast of Ak. I found a 1971 Cascade 29 for $8,000 in SE Alaska. The pictures look good and the owner tells me it is solid and dry and every thing works. Since it is a $1,000 trip to go look at it I had a friend of a friend who lives in the area take look. He is not into sailboats but has a lot of time on powerboats in coastal waters. The info I got back was you get what you pay for, It is worn out, and He would not buy it. He also sent a lead on a 30Ft Rawson for $35,000. The advice I am looking for, since I can probably put together $30,000, should I continue to look for a newer one or go further with the investigation of this one? At $8,000 I would have some money to update but with a newer one there would be no $ left to refit/update/repair?
 

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Be aware that many old boats have negative value - and are worth less, sometimes much less, than nothing. One of my former students was given a project Tartan 27 - after investing all his spare time for two years, and putting in thousands of his hard-earned money he finally realized his error and bailed on it. Don't let that happen to you.
Best to do a lot of crewing (several years at least) so you begin to know what to look for.
Many, many "cheap" boats are not bargains - far from it.
 

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I am 64 and have never sailed on my own! The retirement plan is to explore SE Alaska and Prince William Sound. I don't have much available cash and will not have a large retirement. I plan to take a basic to bareboat in June and go sailing off the coast of Ak. I found a 1971 Cascade 29 for $8,000 in SE Alaska. The pictures look good and the owner tells me it is solid and dry and every thing works. Since it is a $1,000 trip to go look at it I had a friend of a friend who lives in the area take look. He is not into sailboats but has a lot of time on powerboats in coastal waters. The info I got back was you get what you pay for, It is worn out, and He would not buy it. He also sent a lead on a 30Ft Rawson for $35,000. The advice I am looking for, since I can probably put together $30,000, should I continue to look for a newer one or go further with the investigation of this one? At $8,000 I would have some money to update but with a newer one there would be no $ left to refit/update/repair?
My advice would be to take the class FIRST, then think about purchasing. Find out what it takes, what you like, what you don't like and what you can live with.

Some older boats, (SOME) can be worth more than a newer one, if you know what you are looking for. ;)

Some new boats can gobble up a lot more extra $$ just to get them in a condition ready for "you" to cruise in. :eek:

Greg
 

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Jack-
If you had never owned a car before, do you think you could buy an old used one sight unseen and not get stuck with something?

Same thing with boats, only more so. No seller (or broker) mentions the problems that might go unseen by a buyer.

So I'd suggest, do the boating courses. See if and how you like it, see what suggestions and connections you can make while taking the class, firsthand.

Then plan a trip, maybe to Seattle, maybe to Cali, find a place where there are many boats for sale, with active listings, and plan to spend some time looking at them, pick the best of the litter (or none if they're all mutts) and you'll have enough time to have a surveyor confirm your opinion, or find faults you've missed, and proceed with the contract and sale. You're looking at 2-3 weeks optimistically, because even after you buy a "new" new boat? You've got to do a shakedown sail, put in 48 hours on the water, find out if there's anything still wrong, order in parts and fix it...all before you can begin the happily-ever-after trip home.

In the long run, that will be the fastest AND cheapest way to buy your boat.
 

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I am 64 and have never sailed on my own! The retirement plan is to explore SE Alaska and Prince William Sound. I don't have much available cash and will not have a large retirement. I plan to take a basic to bareboat in June and go sailing off the coast of Ak. I found a 1971 Cascade 29 for $8,000 in SE Alaska. The pictures look good and the owner tells me it is solid and dry and every thing works. Since it is a $1,000 trip to go look at it I had a friend of a friend who lives in the area take look. He is not into sailboats but has a lot of time on powerboats in coastal waters. The info I got back was you get what you pay for, It is worn out, and He would not buy it. He also sent a lead on a 30Ft Rawson for $35,000. The advice I am looking for, since I can probably put together $30,000, should I continue to look for a newer one or go further with the investigation of this one? At $8,000 I would have some money to update but with a newer one there would be no $ left to refit/update/repair?
Either the Cascade 29 or the Rawson 30 will be good boats - way over built by modern standards. Another "Alaska strong" boat would be a Willard 30 cutter.
No matter what you decide to buy, get a good survey and follow that surveyor thru the boat and take notes...
As for the price, the recession has really pummeled the prices on boats like these, mostly because they are sought by a much smaller group of sailors than the majority part of the market that seeks huge-interior cheap-built floating RV's.

Opinions rendered while U wait, deposit .02 please!
:)

Regards,
Loren
 
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Beneteau 393
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Jack-
If you had never owned a car before, do you think you could buy an old used one sight unseen and not get stuck with something?.
I use a car analogy too: would I ever buy a 1971 car?

And one thats been dumped in sea water for 45 years....
 
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Develop some objective criteria about the design condition, equipment and needs of the boat you want. Price and age don't really have anything to do with anything (IMO of course). If you were on the east coast, I'd have ideas about what boats might suit your needs. Find someone who knows west coast boats well who can advise you about models which are likely candidates.
 

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islander bahama 24
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howold is too old and how cheap too cheap

Owning a boat and maintaining a boat is not cheap or easy. When I bought my boat after lessons I spent a couple years learning the systems, fixing things and becoming an okay skipper. Year 3-4 I gained more confidence and started really learn sail trim and other advanced skills. Now at year 6 I realize boat ownership is one skill that I am proficient at and sailing is another that boat ownership can get in the way of in the beginning.

After you complete the sailing lessons charter a few times then try partnership and share the cost for a couple years. Out by me there are owner offering non equity partnership (renting partial use each month). This way you can Spend 100% of you time sailing and learn what you want in a boat. Try craigslist for these arrangements.
 

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The advice above that says to take the course first is right on.

Then, remember that any used boat is going to take serious $$ to keep in seaworthy condition, so you can't spend everything you have, just to acquire.

BTW, I assume that cruising Prince William Sound is a fairly short season. Would it make sense to see if you could rent something? I've not heard of very many seasonal rentals, but something to poke around for anyway.
 

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I am 64 and have never sailed on my own! The retirement plan is to explore SE Alaska and Prince William Sound. I don't have much available cash and will not have a large retirement.
Why not crew on someone else's boat first? Much cheaper and much safer. And if you like it, get your own boat. By that time you will have a much better idea what you like and what you need.
 

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Barquito
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I agree with all of the above. However, if you have your head on your shoulders, you could get the best boat you can afford and start sailing. You will need to realize, that if you are learning-as-you-go, that you may be just day sailing for a while. Don't get yourself in over your head.
 

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That Drunk Guy
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The Rawson would have to be in absolute perfect condition for that price. Even then you would not get out of it what you purchased it for. Cascades and Rawsons are solid boats, but you can find both much cheaper.
 

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I have owned boats that ranged from 26 ft costing $5,000 to 55 ft costing $300,000 and the most fun I had was sailing in the PNW with my step-son on the $5,000 boat!

You are certainly not too old...my good friend sailed 1700 nm back to Miami from Grenada for his 80th birthday and then only because he needed knee replacements.

While I have done most of my sailing in Florida I have seen some great 30 ft boats with a reliable diesel that cost less than $10,000.

But take your time to learn and seek boats! First rule of sailing is:

'Never get in a hurry to make a fool of yourself!'

Good luck Phil
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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1 Get hold of Caseys book on Sailboat Maintenance. It has info on doing your own survey.

2 Don't worry about age or price. Instead worry about how well has the boat been maintained and are there any upcoming big ticket items.

3 Before you buy anything around 30 ft at least LOOK at a Catalina 30. IMHO one of the most comfortable 30 ft liveaboards. 1987 Catalina 30 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com The deep draft tall rig version is preferable.
 

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Nauticat 43
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You don't say how fit you are for your 64 years, but, in principle, age shouldn't deter you. You just have to use your years of experience to do this smartly. Taking classes is advisable. After each class, you should replicate the experience with one or more crew, so you become independent using the capability the class taught. The more you sail, the better you'll get and the faster you'll climb the learning curve. I would recommend you joining a sailing club and using their inventory of boats. This will stretch your dollars. Otherwise, volunteer to crew on others' boats. Or, consider bareboat chartering a few times a year. Finally, you could consider buying into a share of a boat. But, maintaining a boat is very expensive. And, that's after you've bought the boat. In any case, come on in! The water's warm (so to speak).
 

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islander bahama 24
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I am assuming you are meaning age of the boat your age is not an issue unless you make it one my dad is 90 and if you are on the water in prince William sound next summer look for us a Spencer 42 light blue and carrys the name LA ruina on her bows he would be happy to give you a few pointers on sailing
 

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old is a state of mind in us folk, and it is a state of maintenance in boats, homes, cars etc.
my last couple boats were 1961, 64, 93 and my present one is a 63.

my primary driver when the sun shines is a 37 ford.

the equipment will do fine if properly maintained.
 

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bell ringer
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I am 64 and have never sailed on my own! .................... The advice I am looking for, since I can probably put together $30,000, should I continue to look for a newer one or go further with the investigation of this one?
I think you should learn and do some sailing first, then if you like it come back to the boat question.

But I also suspect you are looking at the boat now as a "how much would it cost to learn to sail and then get a boat question", which is how I started. In which case if you really are planning to sail much the $30k boat is probably more realistic in the long run.
 
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