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I phrased it as how poor because it is amazing that everyone who does not own a boat thinks that because you do you are rich.
We have been living aboard and sailing slowly around the world for the last 5 years. We have no other property, a limited income and a very frugal lifestyle.
With our income if we lived in a house we would be classed as pretty poor.
To us this life is about more than money. It is about experiencing the world and with the places we have visited, the people we have met and the memories we have then we class ourselves as top of the rich list.
What are your thoughts?
 

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I learned long ago never to judge anyone's financial status by how they live or look. I used to work for an investment company. One client was homeless yet had almost a million dollars in investments. In high school I had a friend who looked like someone you didn't want in your house and drove a junker yet lived in a mansion and was an heir to a to-me-unfathomable, old money fortune.

I'm more curious about what a person gets out of the sailing experience than how much money they have to spend on it.
 

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I learned long ago never to judge anyone's financial status by how they live or look.
Wise advice. "The Millionaire Next Door" is an excellent book that makes just that point. The truth is that the majority of the really wealthy people in this world do not look like millionaires. Sure, there are the Bill Gates and the Arab Sheiks of the world, but they are a relatively small percentage. Gather together everyone in the word with a net worth over a million dollars and probably 90% of them will look--to most people, who don't understand financial wealth--like they don't belong.

Now, to the original question, my guess is that the "average" liveaboard cruiser is wealthier than the "average" dirt dweller. I'm sure there are a lot of exceptions, but that would be my guess.
 

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I learned long ago never to judge anyone's financial status by how they live or look. I used to work for an investment company. One client was homeless yet had almost a million dollars in investments. In high school I had a friend who looked like someone you didn't want in your house and drove a junker yet lived in a mansion and was an heir to a to-me-unfathomable, old money fortune.

I'm more curious about what a person gets out of the sailing experience than how much money they have to spend on it.
Aint' that the truth. I have an attorney friend, who now represents a middle aged woman, whom he had known for several years, and who has worked at a minimum wage job that entire time. She came to him and wanted him to help distribute some of her money to a foundation. He asked her how much, thinking it would a few hundred dollars. She had twenty six million dollars and wanted to donate three million of it.
 

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According to the Global Wealth Report, it only takes a net-worth of about $3,650 to be among the wealthiest half of people in the world. The U.S. Census reports that almost all households earn at least four times that. (The top 90% take home at least $12,401 per year.) Even though two-thirds of Americans claim to be living paycheck to paycheck , the average savings account balance in the U.S. was $5,923 in 2011, according to document-management services company Pitney Bowes.

The global middle and upper classes narrow rapidly. While most people in the world have less than a few thousand dollars to their name, members of the global top 10% earn more than $77,000. The worldwide 1% are worth an average of $798,000. By contrast, Credit Suisse found that more than 95% of adults in India have less than U.S. $10,000 to their name.

That is an excerpt from a recent article in the Philadelphia Inquirer,I found it very interesting ,but it also showed me how unappreciative most Americans are,myself included.
I do find this topic very interesting as I wonder what is most peoples motivation for sailing.Is it financial ? Tired of the rat race ? I read an article the other day that stated that people were cutting back on spending and becoming more frugal due to the recession.I think that is great because things have really gotten out of hand lately,and I do believe more people are heading towards less stressful scaled down living
 

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I recall two incidents that reminded me how lucky I was to be just living on my boat. When I worked in New York I lived on board for several years from April to December when the marina closed down. During the summer I use to go and sit up on the bow with a beer or glass of wine and watch the sunset over New Jersey. One day while I'm doing that I caught a kayaker by the dock staring at me. He looked familiar I gave him a nod and continued watching the sunset. It was only later that I realized it was John F. Kennedy Jr. in the kayak. I wondered if he was somewhat envious of me just being able to hangout considering his obligations and schedule? Same thing when Rupert Murdoch bought his 180 foot yacht Morning Glory up to the dock. Caught Murdoch looking at me while I was nursing a beer. Wondered what he was thinking too. Seeing a guy just hanging out as he pleased while he was going to meetings, dinner parties etc... Somehow I felt my life richer than both of them but, not in a monetary way.
 

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This is a dumb question that borders on belonging in OT/Politics/War/Religion.

Just like everything else in life, cruisers and liveaboards span the entire economic spectrum, assuming you're measuring wealth in terms of money and not other intangible factors like health or happiness.

Also just like everything else (homes, cars, jobs, etc), a person's outward trappings are often not an indicator of their true financial position.

Why all the interest in other people's wallets? It's really none of your business.
 

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This is a dumb question that borders on belonging in OT/Politics/War/Religion.

Just like everything else in life, cruisers and liveaboards span the entire economic spectrum, assuming you're measuring wealth in terms of money and not other intangible factors like health or happiness.

Also just like everything else (homes, cars, jobs, etc), a person's outward trappings are often not an indicator of their true financial position.

Why all the interest in other people's wallets? It's really none of your business.
I agree that other peoples finances are none of anyones business,but in the OP defense it was a broad question ,not aimed at anyone in particular and I think it is a reasonable question as I know I'm curious myself as to what motivates a full time cruiser,is it finances,getting out of the rat race,just a love of the water.I'll admit it could have been asked differently so as to not offend.
 

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I phrased it as how poor because it is amazing that everyone who does not own a boat thinks that because you do you are rich.
We have been living aboard and sailing slowly around the world for the last 5 years. We have no other property, a limited income and a very frugal lifestyle.
With our income if we lived in a house we would be classed as pretty poor.
To us this life is about more than money. It is about experiencing the world and with the places we have visited, the people we have met and the memories we have then we class ourselves as top of the rich list.
What are your thoughts?
Sounds to me like you are quite rich in all the right ways, life is for living and adventure, as i am prone to saying, you don't need to be "rich" to enjoy a good bottle of wine.
 

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Well I have a hard time thinking anyone who can afford a 12 year old (when you started) Oyster 45 would be considered "pretty poor" so you must hang out in a higher class neighborhood than I do. Especially if you are able to support your lifestyle without working. In today's market the only one I see listed is over $300,000 so hardly a tenement. Granted not a super yacht, but not a shack in the woods. I think you are underestimating how blessed you are. Not to mention the experiences you are getting, but on a global scale you are not even close to poor. Do you know if you will have food for dinner tonight? If so you are not poor. Not close, not "pretty poor" by a long shot.
 

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Well I have a hard time thinking anyone who can afford a 12 year old (when you started) Oyster 45 would be considered "pretty poor" so you must hang out in a higher class neighborhood than I do. Especially if you are able to support your lifestyle without working. In today's market the only one I see listed is over $300,000 so hardly a tenement. Granted not a super yacht, but not a shack in the woods. I think you are underestimating how blessed you are. Not to mention the experiences you are getting, but on a global scale you are not even close to poor. Do you know if you will have food for dinner tonight? If so you are not poor. Not close, not "pretty poor" by a long shot.
Hmmm Good points
 

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This is a dumb question that borders on belonging in OT/Politics/War/Religion.

Just like everything else in life, cruisers and liveaboards span the entire economic spectrum, assuming you're measuring wealth in terms of money and not other intangible factors like health or happiness.

Also just like everything else (homes, cars, jobs, etc), a person's outward trappings are often not an indicator of their true financial position.

Why all the interest in other people's wallets? It's really none of your business.
There are no dumb questions, just dumb answers. I guess we know what category this falls in.

When I read the original post, I didn't get that the poster was interested in what was in my wallet. I instead read an interest in what events and experiences make us feel rich while on the water.

I will answer the question simply: Just being in nature and having that feeling of wonder at the beauty and power found therein is what does it for me.

-Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Well I have a hard time thinking anyone who can afford a 12 year old (when you started) Oyster 45 would be considered "pretty poor" so you must hang out in a higher class neighborhood than I do. Especially if you are able to support your lifestyle without working. In today's market the only one I see listed is over $300,000 so hardly a tenement. Granted not a super yacht, but not a shack in the woods. I think you are underestimating how blessed you are. Not to mention the experiences you are getting, but on a global scale you are not even close to poor. Do you know if you will have food for dinner tonight? If so you are not poor. Not close, not "pretty poor" by a long shot.
The one thing about forums is that no matter what you write on them or how you put it people will always try to rip the original question apart or the person writing it.
I don't know how many people answering live and sail their boats permanently. Yes, we have a wonderful boat in my opinion and yes we sold everything to buy her an live this lifestyle.
Compared to poor in other countries we are rich. Compared to others we are poor. That comparison can always be made depending on your views.
I am often asked how much does it cost to cruise all the time which as most know is a very difficult question to answer.
What I will say is that if you live frugally it can be managed on a very low budget but the memories are priceless.
 

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The one thing about forums is that no matter what you write on them or how you put it people will always try to rip the original question apart or the person writing it.
I don't know how many people answering live and sail their boats permanently. Yes, we have a wonderful boat in my opinion and yes we sold everything to buy her an live this lifestyle.
Compared to poor in other countries we are rich. Compared to others we are poor. That comparison can always be made depending on your views.
I am often asked how much does it cost to cruise all the time which as most know is a very difficult question to answer.
What I will say is that if you live frugally it can be managed on a very low budget but the memories are priceless.
Many of your answers are really in the $500/month thread... unfortunately the ones within the $3000/month club or better are injecting their spew into something you want answered to the 'frugality' of living while on a sailboat but they will never answer to except to say it can't be done! :confused:
 

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The one thing about forums is that no matter what you write on them or how you put it people will always try to rip the original question apart or the person writing it.
I don't know how many people answering live and sail their boats permanently. Yes, we have a wonderful boat in my opinion and yes we sold everything to buy her an live this lifestyle.
Compared to poor in other countries we are rich. Compared to others we are poor. That comparison can always be made depending on your views.
I am often asked how much does it cost to cruise all the time which as most know is a very difficult question to answer.
What I will say is that if you live frugally it can be managed on a very low budget but the memories are priceless.
There's an old saying "Opinions are like a**holes,everyone has one and no two are alike".You ask for opinions you're gonna get them,you're certainly not gonna like them all.You referred to what I posted,well it is a fact Americans are a lot richer than we think when compared to the rest of the world.I have to agree with the other comment also that your boat don't make you poor.I rent to poor people,I know what poor is,I have a tenant trying to get by on 9 bucks and hr with 4 kids,I don't think you're in her category.
 

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It is amazing how "some people" get all pissy over nothing, and then express their judgmental views. I get the you have a sail boat so you must have money look as well, hell my boat is almost forty years old and cost less than a good used car. And so it goes... It's all about the experiences, as some seem to understand. Sail on and enjoy.
 
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