SailNet Community banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need to determine the existing bottom paint on my boat so that I can find a compatible paint in the spring. This has been a freshwater boat all its life on Lake Champlain, so it should not be any type of paint that is typically reserved for salt water.

As you can see from the pictures, it is a reddish paint, and if I swipe my finger across the paint (wet or dry) the paint comes away almost like chalk would and I'll have a rust-colored finger.

Any ideas of what it might be or how to test it?



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,555 Posts
What Jim said although I think a wet microfiber cloth works better. The only way to be really sure is to remove the paint or find out from the previous owner. The paint looks pretty bad so if it were me I would get out the stripper and the sanders.
 

·
Barquito
Joined
·
3,566 Posts
I agree with Tim. If you take all the paint off, it doesn't matter what it was. Then you can go with whatever paint you like. (I'm just trying to get more people to sand paint off this spring so I don't feel lonely while sanding 1000 coats off my bottom!)
 

·
I don't discuss my member
Joined
·
2,627 Posts
Most copper-based anti fouling paints are compatible with one another, be they hard or ablative. Assuming the existing paint is a copper-based paint (and it appears to be), maybe the question should be, "What do you want to put over it?"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,026 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The paint looks pretty bad so if it were me I would get out the stripper and the sanders.
On the whole, I do not think it is that bad. On a few areas, like the front of the keel in the picture, a bluish hue of paint is starting to show which I assume is a primer. Along the waterline (close up picture) there are small spots where it is through to the fiberglass but this is very limited in area as can be seen in the top picture. The vast majority of the hull looks like the top picture to the left.

So it sounds like a copper-based ablative might be a match.

As far as what I want to put on, that is the next question. First I need to determine what options I have. This is a freshwater boat that is in the water 5 months of the year with water temps mostly in the 60s and 70s (50s in early spring).
 

·
I don't discuss my member
Joined
·
2,627 Posts
The easiest thing to do is to simply apply another ablative paint. In low-fouling, short-season freshwater it's not going to matter too much which one you choose.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top