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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Trying to figure out how I'm going to install this deck iron for my wood stove chimney. The coachroof is close enough to flat that curves are not a factor (thank heaven), but it is angled about 5-10 degrees (exact angle pending acquisition of a protractor). So that's problem challenge #1. Challenge #2 is that this thing is pretty freakin' huge, like 7.5" across, and needs a 5.5" hole. So I'll need a donut wedge of at least 8" diameter with a 5.5" hole in it. Thickness at the thin end should be at least, say, 1/2" just so it isn't too flimsy, which dictates a fat end of about 1.5"
If there were no angles involved, my crude woodworking skills could make something reasonable out of an appropriate hardwood (or ply w/ glass over it). But without access to a large bandsaw, I have no idea how to cut the angle. Maybe I can make some sort of jig and cut with a hand saw?

Fabricating out of fiberglass would be even better. I considered making a cylindrical "dam" taped to the deck and pouring in ketchup-thick epoxy, which takes care of the angle problem, but I'm afraid even slow hardener will cook, and then there's the job of cutting a 5.5" hole in 1" of solid epoxy.

I could try to shape the wedge out of some kind of styrofoam, but I can't find any in small quantities that can be epoxied/glassed. Just huge surfboard blanks that need to be special ordered.

Just thinking out loud. What would you do? How do angled wedges for large winches get made?

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Seems like you need a 5.5 inch hole through the sloped coachroof to accept the chimney? I'd buy or rent a large deep hole saw. Then I'd scribe a piece of wood on top of the coach roof, whose upper surface was level, to act as a plumb guide and drill down through it and through the roof. Just a thought.
 

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There are a lot of ways to do this. I would probably make a plywood disk the diameter of the plate of the thimble and then rubber cement or tape wax paper to the bottom of the disk and to the deck and find a way to place the disk firmly and rigidly in place. I would probably drill through the deck and use 3 or 4 all thread rods and nuts to tightly attach the rods to the deck, and be able to accurately set the height and angle of the disc.

I would use epoxy thickened to the consistency of chunky peanut butter or thicker. I would use a large washer, the lid from a bottle, or cut a squeegee to a disc. I would inject the epoxy under the plywood simulated base and use the disc to make neat fillet between the plywood disc and the deck. Once it cures, you can drill the hole for the thimble and then the spacer can be sanded and painted.
Jeff
 

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If you can get the dimensions right, would 3-D printing work?
 

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Since I don't have many wood working tools and no shop, I'd probably just take it to the wood shop in a local yard and have then make what you need. I looks like a well built and expensive unit, so it might suit the install to have that made professionally, too.
 
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I might not be understanding the issue correctly, but what I do for this type of thing is:

1. Drill the hole you need it to fit in, wax the fitting very well and tape around the deck where you don't want a mess, put the fitting in the hole at the angle you need it to be (I'm assuming the deck is thick enough that the piece will sit level and have a gap in places that aren't level. If not, then prop it level with some toothpicks or similar.).

2. Fill the gap around it with resin thickened to putty with microballoons and a bit of milled fiber for some strength. You could even use something like West Six-10. If you want it colored without painting, use gelcoat for the resin. Epoxy isn't required here, and polyester/gelcoat gives you more workability and timing options. Fair/cleanup around the edge and wait a bit.

3. When cured, pull out the fitting and clean everything of the wax. You can sand the plinth to make it smoother or better shaped, and paint or gelcoat if you want. Now install it normally with screws/bolts/sealant or whatever.

I do this all the time installing cheek blocks on curved masts/booms, organizers on curved decks, etc. For heavy load things like that, I use cabosil and milled fiber, but your application isn't loaded, so microballoons alone are fine (though I'd add a small amount of milled fiber just because).

Mark
 

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I did one about 6 inches across out of teak. I fixed the teak to a board. Then using concentric hole saws, inside and outside diameter, cut out a ring. Used the same center hole for the drill bit. Since the board under the teak was attached it worked. Did most of the cutting thru the teak on both cuts before cutting thru, first inside then outside. To get the angle I simply marked it in pencil around the perimeter, then with very coarse sand paper on a board I rubbed the ring on the paper until I had it right. By rubbing the ring on paper on a flat board the angle was flat. Slow way to do it but it worked.
 

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You could also try to find a teak winch pad of the appropriate size and modify it as required.


Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Lots of good ideas, thanks folks! I should have clarified that the fitting will have air around it by design (there's a tiny flange you can see in the pics above if you look really closely), so the "make a big glop of resin and sit the wax-coated fitting into it" technique won't quite work, but now that we're thinking about it...maybe. If I can get the big hole drilled in the deck neatly, I could glass tape around the inside to make a vertical tube, then trim the top of that down to the correct angle and flushness, set the deck iron on it, and proceed with glopping resin underneath and shaping until pretty.
I haven't even thought about what I'll do below deck, but that's less critical.

Looks like Whitecap makes a 15 degree teak base of nearly perfect diameter, but I need about half that angle. So close! Maybe sanding the extra 7 degrees off like Waltthesalt would indeed be the simplest solution.

Google Drawing attempt #1:
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Discussion Starter #11
I should note capta's suggestion to go pro on this is also on the plate. Putting feelers out to a couple local recommended marine freelancers.
Despite being 8lbs of beautiful stainless, this deck iron was only $40. Post-bankruptcy ABI Marine inventory at the local consignment shop. It's invaluable, though, in that it's the only deck iron I've found for 3" flue and a threaded, removable chimney - unlike the thin sheet metal friction-fit Dickinson version, which is the only other viable option.
 

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Not sure I understand the air gap because it will be completely sealed off. Another approach is to "sit the wax fitting in a big glop of resin", then when cured, remove the fitting and run a router bit around the inside to get the gap you want. If you use microballoons, it should be toolable enough to just run a drum sander in it.

Mark
 

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If the skinny side is 1/2" and the thick side is 1-1/2" and the overall width is 7-1/2", the resulting angle would be 7.5 degrees. I've noticed that some of the larger winch pads are two pieces with a glue joint in the center. That might not be good since you're going to end up with a donut shape. Particularly since it's skinny on one side.

I can make what you need if you're not in a big hurry. It wouldn't take me long to do the machine work, but I'd have to find a chunk of teak big enough. PM me if you're interested.
 

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To make your wedge, divide and conquer!

Get a taper jig for a table saw:


Then cut a board of whatever thickness you have into wedges of the angle you need. glue them together with epoxy and you have your tapered pad. After finishing your circle and rounding the top edge you could wrap in fiberglass for durability.
 
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