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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Prior to asking my question, I wanted to preface it by stating that I am somewhat new to sailing (did some as a child/teenager, but none as an adult) and this is my first sailboat, and so please forgive my lack of knowledge/ignorance as this is a very new hobby for me. This being said, any guidance would be greatly appreciated.

I recently purchased a Catalina 22 and in the process of cleaning it up and trying to work on restoring everything while it is on the trailer, I noticed that there seems to be water beneath the floor in the cabin. I'm not sure how to get to it or how to get it out, etc. Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks for your help!
 

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Normally there should be a bilge pump in that area. Electrical bilge pumps generally operate automatically with a float switch. There is als a hand perated manual pump to get rid of the water in case the electrical oneis out of order. These pumps normallty operate in the deepest part of the hull.

If you do not have a electrical bilge pump,buy one with a float switch and install it.
 

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Barquito
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On by Catalina 22 (Hull #1588) the water will eventually seep into the space near the volcano (the fiberglass surrounding the keel cable). You can encourage this movement by raising the bow a little (make sure there is sufficient weight at the hitch before raising (should be at least 200 lbs at the hitch if you are interested). Many people who trailer-sail their boats choose not to have automatic bilge pumps. Like they say, 'there is no better pump than handing a bucket to crew and telling them we are sinking'.:D
 

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Crank up the bow, and get in there with a wet dry shop vac. the area you can't reach under the sole will dry if you get a fan in there. After drying ours, I added some glass to the joint at the sole, and waterproofed that area. I was afraid of standing water in there during a cold snap freezing, but it remained dry after, and we never had any problems. Good luck.
 

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Depending on how much water there is, and if you can't get it out with the "Lift the Bow" method, and if just a small amount amount is left in there, simply use a sponge and a bucket. I sail on a buddies 21 Footer, and a sponge is always nearby ready for use.

This will help if there is more water in there than the sponge can handle. (although you can remove an awful lot of water with the sponge, trust me)

Get on of these and place a bucket on the sole, pump the water into the bucket, chuck it overboard and your done.

This is probably all you would need for the 22 footer.
 

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I don't discuss my member
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Best invention EVER!

The second best is having a crew member who can't swim. Give them the bucket and sponge, and I promise, that bilge will be dry as a bone.
 

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Telstar 28
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Evil...but funny....
Best invention EVER!

The second best is having a crew member who can't swim. Give them the bucket and sponge, and I promise, that bilge will be dry as a bone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Update:

I used the manual bilge pump shown above and cleared out most of it, but it seemed that more kept coming out so I tried the tilt/lifting method and was able to soak up a lot more of it with towels and so forth. Hopefully when I check it tomorrow, no further water will have appeared- if it does, I'll continue with the towel/sponge method. So far so good. Thanks everyone! :)
 

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I'm sure there's a few 'puddles' in the boat if you just bought it and its been sitting. More draining down into the bildge is normal, but eventually, if you have no leaks, the bilge will stay dry. And that...... is a good day.
 
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