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SV Skalliwag #141
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You know those fancy yachts at the boat show with the queen sized beds forward and aft? We'll I'm crewing on one in the Salty Dawg Rally. Lucky me I'll be trying to sleep in one of these heeled over. How do you stay in bed? Or should I just sleep on the floor?
 

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Master Mariner
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Our aft cabin centerlline queen berth slides to the leeward side on a rail we put in place when needed. Works quite well. Otherwise, why not just install lee cloths?
 

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Sail bags, gear bags, whatever. If you're doing a multiple day race/rally, you'll be so tired you'll figure it out really quick.
 

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Sailing condominiums are...
A hammock would be a great addition and a good place to sleep while underway. A lee cloth can be fixed on some bunks which keeps you from rolling out of bed. Usually the outside of the hull (ceiling) or a settee back cushion is on one side and the lee cloth on the other. The top of the lee cloth may be hung from something above the bunk or fixed at the ends. The bottom is fixed to the bunk. A settee is a better place to sleep while underway or a pilot berth which is often above and behind a settee.
Blue Performance Lee Cloth - Bunk Safety Guard
But sleeping underway in a sailing condominium...
- CH
 

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Sleep on the floor. We have one of those in our boat and they're really not good in heavy weather.

A hammock will continue swinging long after the boat does. They don't work when a boat is under way, at least I don't think so
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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I like the idea of propping yourself in place with bags and gear
 

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This is the lee-cloth set-up on the boat I used to race on (with one of the bowchicks settling in for the evening). Pretty easy and very effective:

 

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Super Fuzzy Moderator
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Sail bags, gear bags, whatever. If you're doing a multiple day race/rally, you'll be so tired you'll figure it out really quick.
Yep. Every time I've passaged on a boat with crew we all just crashed out on whatever pile of gear looked the least uncomfortabe. Worst experience for me was actually finding myself in the berth that the owner's muttley considered his own and which just happened to be right below the tiller pilot. Mmmmm. Wet smelly dog and bzzzt bzzt bzzzt ... such fun. Even so I still got to sleep and loggishly at that.

Our quarter berth mattress is split with a lee cloth riggable down the middle. That makes for OK comfort either tack. We also have lee cloths on both port and starboard saloon berths but reality is that unless you are in really bumpy conditions offshore as long as you crash in the leeward berth you'll stay put well enough. Even the v-berth is not the horror story you often read about provided there are plenty of sail bags around.

Failing all that ? Yep, the floor. :)
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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You know those fancy yachts at the boat show with the queen sized beds forward and aft? We'll I'm crewing on one in the Salty Dawg Rally. Lucky me I'll be trying to sleep in one of these heeled over. How do you stay in bed? Or should I just sleep on the floor?
Part of the point of center island queens is to be able to climb in and out easily without disturbing whoever you are sharing the berth with. Usually that means it is difficult to stack gear or anything else to wedge yourself in. Everything--including you--ends up on the floor.

Lee cloths work fine although depending on configuration it may take some work to mount fittings to connect it to. On Auspicious the aft berth lee cloths are permanently fixed and are usually under the mattress. They rig to backed up rings in the overhead. I have a plan for a third, centerline cloth that I haven't tried yet. We'll see how that works out.

Sleeping on the floor is highly underrated. It's one of my favorite spots. After all it's hard to fall off the floor. *grin* A good bit depends on the configuration of the boat - you need to find a place that isn't in the way of people getting to the head, nav station, and galley. That usually isn't a problem if those spots are at the base of the companionway (where they should be). It is more problematic with a forward head or a shotgun galley.

Hammocks are a poor solution. They take up a huge amount of room, their swinging gets out of phase with boat motion which is unpleasant, and for those of us who aren't 20 anymore contribute to aches and pains. Day after day spending off watch underway in a hammock below is much different than a nap on the foredeck at anchor. Most assuredly not recommended. Makes my back hurt just thinking about it.

Have fun on the Salty Dawg. Let us know which boat you are on so we can watch on the tracker.

It's only chilly for the first day or so until you get past the Gulf Stream.
 

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SV Skalliwag #141
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Discussion Starter #14
Auspicious: I'm supposed to be on Charmed Life, a Beneteau 49. Weather for next week is crap so I see already delays at the starting line.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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Auspicious: I'm supposed to be on Charmed Life, a Beneteau 49. Weather for next week is crap so I see already delays at the starting line.
Have a great time.

I see a different story for next week. This is what I look at: AuspiciousWorks - Communications / Yacht Management / Deliveries Worldwide . I see a front moving over Hampton on the 3rd (about) and good wind (about 20 kts) Nly behind it. If you head out at 135T (my preferred course leaving the Chesapeake) you'll cross the Gulf Stream where it is fairly diffuse and NEly. It might be bumpy for half a day but shouldn't be bad. Do meal prep ahead and look forward to warmer temps. Keep everything tied down and secure. By the time you get to 65W and turn South the ride South should be glorious until at least the 9th.

Is Chris Parker saying something different?
 

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I find dragging a squab onto the floor best when the sea is rough you cant fall any further,the only issue is some plonker walking on you in the dark
 

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Chances are, most of the trip will be sailed on port tack, so the starboard settee will be the prime spot... Unfortunately, looks like it might be a bit short...





If there's more than one off watch at a time, the only real alternative would seem to be the aft berth, sleeping across the head of the bed, with your feet outboard... As usual with these aft stateroom arrangements, it's guaranteed to place your head as close as possible to the autopilot motor and ram... You may have a better appreciation for one of the unsung advantages of windvanes, by the end of the trip :)





Good luck, and have fun, let us know how it goes...
 

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I sailed back from Bermuda on a Beneteau with a big queen bed aft. Only the aft side of the bed was against the hull, so there was walking space along the other three sides. After a midnight to 3:00 am watch at the tail end of tropical storm Curtis, with the boat tossing and heeling horrendously I found it almost impossible to sleep on the bed without sliding or rolling off. Finally I hung my arms, head and upper torso over the side, positioned like I was about to pull myself over a wall, and managed to sleep some, due to sheer exhaustion. They clearly weren't thinking of big seas when they designed this boat.


The skipper said he didn't want us sleeping on the settees in the saloon, because his wife didn't want sweat stains on them or something like that. After 24 hours I rebelled and jammed myself between some gear on a settee and slept like a baby.
 

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If it is an aft cabin catamaran, you just pull the sheets up.:)

I've slept underway with a bad back in spasm, lying on a heating pad, in rough conditions without trouble. Just a gentle up-and-down motion. It helps that the bunks (queen each side) are athwartships. My family always sleeps in.
 
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