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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hope it is okay to post this here. I'm trying to learn how to value a used sail I have that I plan to sell. I know very little about checking the quality of the construction and so forth. I have a new mainsail I am happy with, as well as the old mainsail, plus this loose footed main I want to part with to fund other purchases.

There are no markings on it, and it seems clean, with no tears or past repairs. I guess the question (s) is: Will the type of stitching or cloth really matter on a used cruising mainsail? I have not seen any other used loose footed sails out there. What impact does this have on the value? Am I just over thinking this and just need to put it up for $200?

There is not a lot of demand where I am here in Georgia, or it would be easier to get local advice. Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. Daddy needs a new grill!:D

Here are a couple pics of the construction.







 

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Barquito
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I think most sail re-sellers will value according to what is looks like (stitching, stains, etc). Maybe add more if it is obviously off-shore quality, has full battens, etc. However, the real value to a new owner should have nothing to do with this. Just about the only thing that should matter is how it fits their boat, and how it sails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That makes good sense, thanks. I guess my challenge will be finding anyone local who can look at it before buying. I dislike ebay at times.
 

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Search out Bacon Sails in Annapolis. You can search their website to see comparables.

Biggest driver, aside from condition will be demand. Wont matter if its the finest sail ever made if it doesn't fit someones boat
 

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You may want to send the sail to Bacons and let them evaluate it, list it, and sell it. They are quite reputable and are a fixture in Annapolis. Their terms are 50% of the sale price. I sold a genoa through them last year and netted far more than I ever thought possible. On the other hand, they don't take junk - they refused my old beat up mainsail.

While it will cost you to ship to Annapolis, you have a high probability of sale. How about trying to sell the sail yourself for 6 months and if you aren't successful with that go to Plan B - listing it with a used sail broker?
 

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A used sail broker is going to evaluate based on fabric condition, stitching condition, and cleanliness. That is basically all that you can go on without flying the sail.

If you sell it yourself and can take a photo of the sail flying (so that the shape can be seen) that will put you a step ahead of most sail brokers and might help you get better pricing. I'm personally more likely to buy a sail if I can see it's shape ahead of time.
 

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Barquito
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The nice thing about e-bay is that the audience is generally wide enough that you will sell it for what it is worth (which is sometimes less than what you think it is worth). However, things that cost a lot to ship are not that good on e-bay.
 
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