SailNet Community banner

41 - 60 of 67 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
So you need a part.
In US get on IPad. Find manufacturer, various vendors, distributors. Compare costs and availability. Maybe get it on eBay, or amazon or defender or west or maybe get in care and go to distributor or directly to manufacturer.
In Windwards go to IWW or budget or small specialty shop. Maybe wait a week. Maybe another week for broker to get his act together. Or maybe three weeks so go off cruising after paying with intention of stopping back when available.
Still, in US you’ll get it and be able to shop for best price.
In Windwards if volume falls sufficiently mechanics of importation become so difficult as to make access impossible. Have had stuff fedexed to me. Have had occasion where local shops don’t carry or have in catalogue or have no interest in getting me a part unless they do the install. Unless you are a long term marina resident or real friendly with a local arranging a shipping address is difficult. So if charter business collapses and doesn’t come back or number of cruisers falls sufficiently long term cruising will below increasingly more difficult and expensive.
Used to take two passages a year. One R.I. To Caribbean. Other Caribbean to R.I. Allowed very limited marina time. Allowed restocking all spares, tools and non food supplies for the year without difficulties. Once when getting home. Again just before leaving. Passage is hard on you and the boat. Last year just stored in Caribbean for hurricane season. No passages. Easy on the boat and you. Think if things go south with the islands boating services infrastructure will be forced to do biannual passages again.
I have made shipments to the islands. Sending to St Martin is a snap through Four Star Cargo in Miami. They will ship to Grenada (and other islands) also but the broker in Grenada is on Island Time. It adds to the cost, but sometimes you get the bear and sometimes the bear gets you. Life happens.

I find the costs are not too very bad. 2 years ago I made some aluminum hatch covers. I actually made them 2 sides of my shipping container to save space and shipped them on as checked baggage. The “box” was chock full of parts.

This year I ended up with 3 packages that included custom Ss handrails and a 2 piece aluminum tiller and a custom radar mount among other things. It was a bit of a hassle. Fed Ex to Miami, air freight to Grenada, broker to clear customs. It took a while but it worked. And a whole lot less than doing a round trip back to the states.

Hell 3 years ago I shipped a maple butter block counter top from the USA to Canada. That was much more complicated. I needed 2 different shippers and a customs broker and a guy to do the pick up 4 hours away.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,235 Posts
I have stuff shipped to the Caribbean via Tropical Shipping. They will pick it up at my daughter's house and ship it to any island (not French) cheap as can be, and they are a pleasure to deal with.

A rebuilt engine for my genset; 350#, about us$365.00, a barrel of chain, 600#, about the same. A barrel of misc parts, 230#, about US$170. Takes 4 or 6 days from Riviera Beach Fla to Caribbean, north quicker than south, obviously. Takes another couple of days to unstuff the LCL container.

If you've got all your paperwork together, customs is usually pretty kind, everywhere except Grenada, for shipments to a "YACHT IN TRANSIT." I don't ship much to Grenada. So far, St. Lucia has been duty free using the marina's agent, Kenneth (a really good guy). We won't go to St. M. any more, so I've no idea about that place.

I've had 2 day air take almost as long as surface, for an exorbitant rate, which does piss me off, so I'm pretty happy with Tropical.
Having an agent can be helpful in saving money and time, but they are a bit like lawyers, you need to pick carefully.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
Yup have shipped stuff.harder to do in Windwards then leewards. Have had stuff “misplaced “ as well. But was addressing my thoughts on what it will be like after the pandemic clears more than what’s it like now. Now even if you don’t sail home it’s manageable. Ship stuff to my kid(s). Pick it up at Xmas or when someone comes down. My experience with brokers has been quite mixed. A lot of times it’s the non chandlery stuff that’s hard to shop for. Holding something in your hand You’ll use cooking or trying on clothes before buying is a small pleasure I miss now and expect to be totally absent in the future. Both from the absence of brick and mortar everywhere but also the logistics of island living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
I think now a lot MAY change going forward. Lots of potential for us to be encouraged to continue “social distancing.” It would be very easy for me to go off on a dystopian rant about how. I’ll try to resist.

Think about these.......

Mass Transit. Being check by jowel on a subway car or bus?
Or air plane travel?
Or concerts?
Or mass demonstrations against the region?
Religious gatherings?
Cruise ships?

Anything that brings large numbers of people together will take a hit.

Perhaps this is a good time to invest in that bug out cottage? But even there you are an “outsider” to the “locals” even if they have been there only 5 years longer. You will need to do some ground work to be assimilated into the community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,504 Posts
I think now a lot MAY change going forward. Lots of potential for us to be encouraged to continue “social distancing.” It would be very easy for me to go off on a dystopian rant about how. I’ll try to resist.

Think about these.......

Mass Transit. Being check by jowel on a subway car or bus?
Or air plane travel?
Or concerts?
Or mass demonstrations against the region?
Religious gatherings?
Cruise ships?

Anything that brings large numbers of people together will take a hit.

Perhaps this is a good time to invest in that bug out cottage? But even there you are an “outsider” to the “locals” even if they have been there only 5 years longer. You will need to do some ground work to be assimilated into the community.
You're still gonna need a gun. :)

https://youtu.be/QHqB2t-DGb8
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,235 Posts
Hehe!

Guns I’ve got. Just not the AR/AK variety.
I still can"t think of a single reason to own an AK/AR unless one is such a bad shot it takes 30 rounds to hit what the average marksman can hit with 2! If one is that poor a shot, then they probably shouldn't be allowed to own a weapon anyway.
 
  • Like
Reactions: hpeer and chef2sail

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,643 Posts
I still can"t think of a single reason to own an AK/AR unless one is such a bad shot it takes 30 rounds to hit what the average marksman can hit with 2! If one is that poor a shot, then they probably shouldn't be allowed to own a weapon anyway.
It's definitely not practical to have one aboard a boat. I don't own one. However, I see the practical use of defending oneself inside ones home, from a home invader that isn't scared away by knowing you're there. Very low odds of it happening, but that's what the tool is for.

Self defense misses more than it hits, particularly when you're being shot at. Both the military and the police expend an amazing number of rounds per hit. BTW, AKs sound much scarier than our M16s. Much bigger louder round.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,235 Posts
It's definitely not practical to have one aboard a boat. I don't own one. However, I see the practical use of defending oneself inside ones home, from a home invader that isn't scared away by knowing you're there. Very low odds of it happening, but that's what the tool is for.

Self defense misses more than it hits, particularly when you're being shot at. Both the military and the police expend an amazing number of rounds per hit. BTW, AKs sound much scarier than our M16s. Much bigger louder round.
I'd much prefer not to have to use a firearm than use one, so if it is deterrence one seeks, racking a pump shotgun will usually do the job.
If not, a 12 ga buckshot load isn't a shabby way to defend oneself. Pretty darned hard to miss your target with one of those, at a fairly close range. The shotgun is a lot less prone to misfires and jamming.
It was the only successful weapon in the jungle in Burma and it wasn't bad in that other skirmish down that way, either.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
53 Posts
I remember the days when international travelers had to carry a little yellow book that showed that they were vaccinated against certain diseases. I see this returning, and being enforced. No vaccinations, no entry.
That really dates you. I still have mine though the entries are severally out of date. I always wondered why they, (governments) stopped requiring them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,643 Posts
I'd much prefer not to have to use a firearm than use one, so if it is deterrence one seeks, racking a pump shotgun will usually do the job.
If not, a 12 ga buckshot load isn't a shabby way to defend oneself. Pretty darned hard to miss your target with one of those, at a fairly close range. The shotgun is a lot less prone to misfires and jamming.
It was the only successful weapon in the jungle in Burma and it wasn't bad in that other skirmish down that way, either.
If one were permissible, I agree. A 12g short barrel shotgun, with a pistol grip and 00 buck, is the way to go, for barricaded self defense. However, still not hard to miss. The pattern spread at 10 feet, aboard a boat isn't going to be very wide. Thankfully, the need is so slight, I'm not tempted. I'm a competitive shooter and my wife pressures me to figure out how to bring one. I say no. The only place I could legally do so, is my home waters, which are absolutely the least necessary.

All guns at home are in a locked vault, unloaded. Well, one clip is loaded, but not in the glock. :)
 

·
Captain Obvious
Joined
·
2,325 Posts
I'd much prefer not to have to use a firearm than use one, so if it is deterrence one seeks, racking a pump shotgun will usually do the job.
If not, a 12 ga buckshot load isn't a shabby way to defend oneself. Pretty darned hard to miss your target with one of those, at a fairly close range. The shotgun is a lot less prone to misfires and jamming.
It was the only successful weapon in the jungle in Burma and it wasn't bad in that other skirmish down that way, either.
Rock salt was the preferred buckshot of old time farmers and head breakers. My old marina was literally on the wrong side of the tracks. You didn't mouth off to the criminals who roamed the docks or you would find your lines cut 9/10ths of the way through. The CSX train tracks ran right through the place and there was some 100 year old deed rights that prevented the railroad from just closing the place.The old timers ( who are never wrong) told us how back in the 40's and 50's the "railroad cops" would fire rock salt at the boats from moving train cars. Everyone would hunker down behind a boat as the train went through and then go back to painting and/or drinking. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,938 Posts
Assuming that "we" emerge from the pandemic... one would think the new normal will be different. The economy will have to "restart" and that may take some time.

What will change? Will people be paranoid about infection? Will the general level of hygiene increase? Will people avoid crowded places?

Will we see some structural changes such as "medicare" for all and the demise of the insurance companies in the health sector? Will Pharma take some sort of hair cut?
Will the living wage be passed into law? A guaranteed income for all? A new tax structure? Student loans forgiven? Have weakness in "market" capitalism been revealed by the crisis? Will they be addressed?

Or will behavior and everything else return as if nothing happened?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
NYT had editorial about risk of demise of democracy. Big risk is we’ll go the way of Hungary. Can see using voter suppression as mechanism to ensure one party rule.
Need to separate risk of death from risk of infection. On that level we live in two different countries. Low density rural v urban
Work from home via technology v need to show up
Educated with ability to understand, parse and then follow logical behavior v uneducated and motivated by hearsay, emotion and bias.
Rich v poor.
These are gross divisions and often untrue still in the face of a near future majority minority population can see a post covid world being very dystopian. The majority of the population disenfranchised politically, economically and unable to use the legal system for redress.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,643 Posts
.....Educated with ability to understand, parse and then follow logical behavior v uneducated and motivated by hearsay, emotion and bias.
Rich v poor.......
While a correlation between education and wealth, it's far from confined to it. I know plenty of very smart poor people and very dumb wealthy people. No public policy can fix it. Beauty is skin deep, but stupid goes straight to the bone. There are inherent limitation on intelligence, they simply are not confined to any demographic.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
Totally agree. Had teaching appointments at BU and Harvard. Many initials after your name has no correlation with commonsense. Although many still buy into the Horacio Alger myth of hard word, savings and honesty from my experience being born to the right parents, having a high degree of egocentricity and low moral sense is more likely to result in wealth. What bugs me is they don’t even have trouble sleeping at night.
Still, if you look at this epidemic
If you’re able to social distance effectively it does highly correlate to wealth, and education allowing you the resources to shop very infrequently, obtain personal protective equipment, work remotely, have enough space for individual toilets, bedrooms etc. it also correlates with a culture of seeking medical inventions, trusting there are people in the world who are smarter than you about certain things and not everything is fake news.
Look at death rates broken down by demographics. Not only here but world wide. All are consistent with my #55 post.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
11,803 Posts
What caused the NY spike.....was it race....I don’t think so
Density is more like it IMHO
Had nothing to do if people were smart or not

Many Manhattan/ Bronx layers, doctors professors live on top of each other in high rises where everyone uses and elevator. Many people of all social classes use mass transit. Very few grocery stores / per population. Even the suburbs in NY, NJ and Connecticut affected. Despite not living in the city....they worked there. Few took cars.
Ferries, mass transit, trains

This may drive some out of the city type demographic. While this pandemic attacked people with hypertension/ diabetes the next monster may have different dynamics. The transmission was incredibly fast. Think about it, it been 2 month in the US World wide 4.

When one person in the ant hill got sick, it spread like wildfire.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,069 Posts
Even in nyc deaths per 100,000 were heavily skewed toward
Blacks
Poor
In person workers.
Even among ICU admissions and corrected for age the same is seen.
Incidence of uncontrolled HTN,morbid obesity, DM, CV events is higher in this segment.
Incidence of multi family living in one apartment and multiple sleepers in a single bedroom is higher.

I grew up in Manhattan. Had friends on Sutton Place, One UN plaza and perimeter of Central Park. Also had friends in Harlem, Lower East side, and meat district before those places were yuppified. In the former would say covid risk is same as or less than rural Montana. In the later same as Mombai.

Numbers are numbers. So there’s “lies,lies, and statistics “. But here at least the numbers don’t lie.

The “we’re all in this together” is kind of BS. It’s more like the pig and hen when they chat about what the farmer is having for breakfast tomorrow. The low fliers at spring break or the shoulder to shoulder out of work people fishing on the local ponds in my town(closed but they still just drive in) knowing at 20-30 and in perfect health their risk of death is negligible. They listen to that phrase and chuckle.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,791 Posts
OK you Docs, please explain something to me.

The city-state is studying using cruise ships to temporarily house foreign workers who have recovered from the coronavirus and tested negative, as it tries to limit the spread after cases soared in the last week.
Why would you want to isolate folks who have recovered and “tested negative.”? Maybe I don’t know what tested negative means.

https://fortune.com/2020/04/17/singapore-cruise-ships-workers-coronavirus/amp/
 
41 - 60 of 67 Posts
Top