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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here's an excellent YouTube video that goes into some benefits. Found it very educational.


Regards,
Brad
 

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I like the way everyone has jumped on the buzzword "nanotechnology".

Painting and coating ain't nanotechnology when you dump something in a bucket.

Nanotechnology would be using teeny tiny robots to apply the coating at the microscopic level, evenly applying it to the contours of the substrate.

When you are using machines that are bigger than a pinhead, ergh, bigger than the head of a pin? It ain't nanotech, its nano-nonsense.

Nanites that can carve microtextures into my hull and make it replicate sharkskin? Yes, that's nanotech. Casting a new hull, or sheets of a liner, in a huge mold that happens to be textured? Ain't.
 

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I like the way everyone has jumped on the buzzword "nanotechnology".

Painting and coating ain't nanotechnology when you dump something in a bucket.

Nanotechnology would be using teeny tiny robots to apply the coating at the microscopic level, evenly applying it to the contours of the substrate.

When you are using machines that are bigger than a pinhead, ergh, bigger than the head of a pin? It ain't nanotech, its nano-nonsense.

Nanites that can carve microtextures into my hull and make it replicate sharkskin? Yes, that's nanotech. Casting a new hull, or sheets of a liner, in a huge mold that happens to be textured? Ain't.
How about micro machines that can continuously scrub the bottom eliminating the need for chemicals?!?!? Kind of like if you had 1000's of divers working 24X7 all powered by the electrolyte of the salt water. That would be awesome nano technology. But I guess we have to settle for a pin head diving our boats, no offense meant fastbottoms just trying to make a pun.
 

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The two part paint in the first part of the video is available from Rustoleum now.

Rust-Oleum® NeverWet® Liquid Repelling Treatment

Same footage from the start-up company that came up with it, they partnered or were bought out by Rustoleum, not sure which. They carry it at Home Depot.

And I do agree that this is not really nano tech.
 

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Nano Technology - the branch of technology that deals with dimensions and tolerances of less than 100 nanometers, especially the manipulation of individual atoms and molecules.​

Actually Never Wet by Rust-oleum is nano-technology. It's based on a product originally marketed as Ultra-Ever Dry. Here's a link to the TED talk that discusses how this super hydrophobic material works.

Unlike Never Wet carbon nano tubes still face some significant issues in manufacturing and while they show tremendous potential it may be some time before we see them used in everyday products.
 

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Getting back to Brad's original question I could see a product like Never Wet being adapted to a for a lot of marine uses assuming you can overcome some wear and UV issues.

- How about canvas that repells not only water by seagull droppings.

- Decks that remain dry and non-slip even as you're taking green water over the bow.

- Hatch seals that repel water

- Bottom paints that maintain a layer of oxygen between the hull and the water making the boat faster while repelling marine growth.

- "Normal" sailing clothes that can be worn as foul weather gear.

I think there are a lot of potential products for sailors.

:D
 

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Forte has already begun producing carbon nano-tube/carbon-fiber/epoxy masts. They claim an increased compressive strength of about 15% for the same weight. Or a reduction in weight by about the same.

Cost however is still R&D priceing so get your check book ready.
 

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That is not Nano . Just chemistry of water repellentancy. Not much more. Sticking a glove in mud is Not nao-chemistry.
I have been in composite engineering, try Nano embedded in composite structure so when it breaks , capsule molecules break open with catalyst to cause a curing reaction. Mend thyself.

Pretty cool. Broken composite structure fixes itself.
 

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Here's an excellent YouTube video that goes into some benefits. Found it very educational.


Regards,
Brad
I looked into this "miracle" coating a year ago. I believe the basic ingredients are xylene and acetone both chemicals are readily available. They are applied as two separate coatings. Not sure which is applied first. I've never tried to duplicate it though.
 

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sheeit... it's difficult to get the sailing community to adopt well-established tech like HMPE lines/rigging (Dyneema lifelines' racing legality has been retracted, f'instance); I would be in doubt that nanotech is adopted in anything like the near future
 

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I would hope that an antifouling application that was proactive it repulsing attaching organisms would be rapidly endorsed by sailors. Such a product could reduce or eliminate one of the most costly maintenance items on a boat and reduce toxins in the environment. Simply being "slick" is probably not enough. Of course my history degree gives me no idea how that would be achieved.
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I looked into this "miracle" coating a year ago. I believe the basic ingredients are xylene and acetone both chemicals are readily available. They are applied as two separate coatings. Not sure which is applied first. I've never tried to duplicate it though.
Both Xylene and Acetone evaporate rapidly and are solvents for disolving things. It was probably the thing(s) dissolved that was the real "miracle".

Regards,
Brad
 

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Has anyone tried this as an anti-fouling? Seems it might be worth it to test on a dingy that is kept in the water most of the year.
I had the same thought but was thinking about masking off an area on the dinghy or even on the hull and spraying it on. Then keeping an eye on it over the course of the season to see if there was a difference and how long it lasts.

I was also wondering how it would work on the prop.
 
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