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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey folks,

Putting this question out on a couple forums for guidance. I need to repair some hull paint where it appears to have been stripped off when removing the vinyl letters of the boat's prior name. Prior owner had the boat repainted a year ago. From what I am told the paint job might have been on the budget and not the best quality. Removing the old vinyl letter also stripped off several large sections of paint. See pic attached -- red/white on the left folded back on itself to reduce the sticky glue area, the white is paint that was pulled off.

I THINK the proper repair is wet sanding with 1k-2k grit sandpaper and applying several coats of paint in the stripped area to build it back up and match color, with continued sanding and painting, until i can try to wax/polish to blend it back in. Am I on the right track?

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

Hood Paint Asphalt Triangle Flag
 

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Barquito
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Depends on what paint you use. I know with Interlux paints, for example, you can't sand and polish the final coat. It could be hard to make it blend smoothly. If you do a reasonable job then put new lettering on top, you probably won't be able to see small imperfections.
 

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It's essential that you learn what kind of paint it is to get a useful answer.

If he used one part paint, then you could proceed as you said, with building it up and polishing with the appropriate materials and expect a reasonable result.

The characteristics of two part paints are generally completely different, and may not allow compounding and polishing. And, are notorious for not allowing blending of repairs. I haven't done any two-part painting in a couple decades, so I can't speak to any of the newer two parts.

If you can't get an answer from the previous owner, someone with a little experience could probably tell if it's one or two part, but maybe not much more. If it's fairly thick, that points to single part.

The picture doesn't give an idea of how much area is affected. If it's not too widespread I would definitely consider applying new graphics to hide the damage. I have used lettering.com on numerous occasions with excellent results. I mention them not only because I like their service and product, but they have an excellent user interface for designing your own graphics. They have a huge amount of available fonts, and you can fatten the letters and reduce the spaces between them. It lets you easily set the exact length and height of your graphic. It's simple to use. And it's fun.

Or, stepping into an area where I'm profoundly ignorant, what about a vinyl wrap? Some boaters are using vinyl wraps to completely cover their topsides, so I wonder if a wrap could be used creatively on a smaller portion of the topsides.

My first thought was that if it was my boat, I'd paint the whole damn thing, so it's right. But, no, I'd pursue hiding the damage, and maybe come up with something pretty good.
 

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That is caused by poor surface prep before the paint job... If they didn't prep that spot, the rest of the boat probably isn't much better... I would take all the paint off the transom and try again....
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It's essential that you learn what kind of paint it is to get a useful answer.

If he used one part paint, then you could proceed as you said, with building it up and polishing with the appropriate materials and expect a reasonable result.

The characteristics of two part paints are generally completely different, and may not allow compounding and polishing. And, are notorious for not allowing blending of repairs. I haven't done any two-part painting in a couple decades, so I can't speak to any of the newer two parts.

If you can't get an answer from the previous owner, someone with a little experience could probably tell if it's one or two part, but maybe not much more. If it's fairly thick, that points to single part.

The picture doesn't give an idea of how much area is affected. If it's not too widespread I would definitely consider applying new graphics to hide the damage. I have used lettering.com on numerous occasions with excellent results. I mention them not only because I like their service and product, but they have an excellent user interface for designing your own graphics. They have a huge amount of available fonts, and you can fatten the letters and reduce the spaces between them. It lets you easily set the exact length and height of your graphic. It's simple to use. And it's fun.

Or, stepping into an area where I'm profoundly ignorant, what about a vinyl wrap? Some boaters are using vinyl wraps to completely cover their topsides, so I wonder if a wrap could be used creatively on a smaller portion of the topsides.

My first thought was that if it was my boat, I'd paint the whole damn thing, so it's right. But, no, I'd pursue hiding the damage, and maybe come up with something pretty good.

Helpful and good to know. Thank you. The affected areas are a handful of 6 to 12 inch streaks on the sides. My guess is 1 part paint because of the thickness. Stern area where hailing port letters were came off perfectly fine. I will probably sand the areas a bit before applying the patch coating of paint to see if it sticks better and helps with a decent fix. Thanks again
 

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IMHO 1000 to 2000 grit for sanding is more like polishing. I think paint requires a mechanical bond so 1000 grit will not provide a bonding surface. Best to check with the paint manufacture for prep recommendations.
 

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I THINK the proper repair is wet sanding with 1k-2k grit sandpaper ...
You don't want to use 1k to 2k grit prior to painting, instead you need to "key" or rough up the surface to give the paint some grip, which is probably what the previous painter did not do. Good marine paint shouldn't peel like that, regardless of whether it's one part or two part. The typical process is
1) Clean thoroughly with solvent (you don't want to sand in old contaminates)
2) Sand with 220 (some finishes vary, but 220 grit is normal), feathering the old edges.
3) Paint with primer and paint (remember to tip off and do the smoothest job you are capable of for each coat), let dry, resand each coat with 340ish grit, wipe away dust. Repeat as necessary, usually two coats of primer, 3 paint, more if necessary.

Many modern paints, one part or two part, don't need any polishing after the last coat. Just let it cure (a couple weeks), and wax.

If you do want to polish, THEN you can wet sand with 2k or higher.
 
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