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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well I need to do my research.
It seems that awlcraft 2000 is the paint of choice.
However the PO decided to use the bare hull as a fender and there is one spot the gel is worn down to fibreglass. The rest is old and chalky.
So my question is this. What prep must I do?
Do I need the entire hull down to fibreglass?
Must I do some sort of fill on the bare fibreglass?
I have been looking for a guide with no luck so far.

The second part of the question is the hull below the waterline.
The keel scraped on the ground for a while, and the paint is gone, just fibreglass showing on the bottom. What do I need to paint this with?

I painted cars for about 18 months, and I am pretty good at spraying.
 

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So, like painting cars, AWLGrip is glossy and every imperfection shows thru. All the prep steps and coatings are detailed in their datasheets. Like a good auto paint job it is not trivial. Generally no need to remove good solid coatings. AWLGrip really stick well.

The keel is easier. But again, each antifoul has it's own instructions about primers, fillers and barrier coats.
 

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AWLgrip has indeed the best reputation, a boat builder friend of mine was able to spray 7 coats in one day.
Having said that I am quite happy with International 2 parts polyurethane paints, since I am not a sraying expert I roll it with very good result on the entire deck and curently repainting the upper part of the freeboard. Minor imperfection are easy to correct with polishing wax.
You probably do not need to sand down to the fiber, a good aggressive sanding to rmove the chalky part and a coats of undercoats will do the job nicely.
Below the waterline gouging scars can be patched with epoxy resin and microbloom fibers. Any antifouling will require and epoxy primer coat and some add a tie down coat before the antifouling.
I was very happy with International micron extra antifouling lasting 3 years with no flaking and hardly any barnacles. Unfortunately this product is sold at an exorbitant price in the Philippines so I will try Shugoku antifouling, I'll just have to see how it works out.
Fair winds,
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
unfortunately the damage is above the waterline, and will need filling of some sort.
What product would I use for this?
Glad I do not have to take the existing down to fibreglass as this would be a monumental pain. I would rather use a roller then a sprayer, does awlcraft 2000 allow this as well, or just the other paint you mention?
 

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....It seems that awlcraft 2000 is the paint of choice. ........
It's a fine paint, but I would think the LP paints are more popular. Awlgrip and awlcraft are two very different paints. Awlcraft 2000 paint is acrylic, being easier to apply and repair. However, softer too, which is probably how your PO wore through it.

I actually removed that paint and applied Alexseal (an LP paint invented by the original inventor of Awlgrip) about 4 years ago. It's an LP paint, with the reported repairable properties of an acrylic. I'm testing that theory this spring, as I need some mooring bridle rub rash buffed out. That would not be possible on Awlgrip, as it has a clear layer that floats to the top. Alexseal reportedly is color throughout the layer.

LP paints require more skill to apply, which it seems you may have. I paid. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I had originality planned to use awlgrip. The repair issue was the big issue for me. I try to be careful, but I don't want to have a bad day because of a little scratch. If its an easy fix it will remove anxiety from minor damage.
The current "paint" is gel coat I believe. Circa 1981. It didn't do bad over 33 years. But it needs renewed and repaired.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
rustoleum sells marine paint, about $10 a quart at HD or Lowe's, roll,tip. nice finish, easy to touch up.And like all paint jobs, totally dependant on the quality of the surface preparation.
holds up great and wears like iron.
Are you talking about the rustolium I am using on the mast?
Rustolium professional?
 

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After your beautiful paint job, the next best day is getting the big scratch..then your worries are over....You might consider painting somewhere offshore...your just gonna end up thrashing it anyway...there may be a cheaper venue down the road a bit...far better things to do with your time prior to an offshore voyage then painting your boat.
 

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A great method to apply paint with spray results is rolling and tipping.I built a boat and used this method and it looked as good as spray.There are Youtube videos showing how to do it,but it's basically rolling the paint on in one direction with a fine roller,then the tipping is using a high quality brush with just a slight amount of paint right on the very bottom and going over the part you just painted at a 45 degree angle in the other direction which smooths it out
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After your beautiful paint job, the next best day is getting the big scratch..then your worries are over....You might consider painting somewhere offshore...your just gonna end up thrashing it anyway...there may be a cheaper venue down the road a bit...far better things to do with your time prior to an offshore voyage then painting your boat.
I do not enjoy having a boat that looks trashy. This damage to the hull paint has driven me insane for 18 months now. Its just been a lower priority as my teak looked like a rough cut tree. The teak will be done as soon as I get the mast painting finished then I am onto the hull. These are all cosmetic, and important to me to look good.
 

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Be sure to pack clean undies. Your time spent making it look good could be very detrimental to your health and welfare, not to mention the rescue service guys...
 

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If you have experience spray painting, its quite easy to spritz new 'computer color matched' gelcoat over damaged areas.
Old chalky and dull gelcoat most times can be restored to 'showroom new' ... by wet sanding, and power-buffing - like what is done when a new hull it's pulled from is mold. Use computer color matched gel 'paste' for the 'dings' and scratches and spritz and blend the final gel coat 'fill' with inexpensive, self contained refillable 'spray bottles' (Preval, etc).

Most hulls that are painted, immediately lose significant resale value - IMO. There is NO boat paint that can withstand long term immersion ... including days on end of being heeled over; nor, being tightly covered/'tarped' when on the hard.

Guns for spritzing gel are cheap. With color matched and pre-mixed 'ready for spray' gels, you dont have the do an entire hull ... all at once. Can be done 'in parts' ... if you already know how to 'taper-blend sections with a spray gun'.
 

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The secret to a good looking paint job is to be out cruising, on anchor or a mooring, where admirers are many meters away. Not at a dock where they can see every dimple and scratch.
 
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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The secret to a good looking paint job is to be out cruising, on anchor or a mooring, where admirers are many meters away. Not at a dock where they can see every dimple and scratch.
I have to see it. That is all the reason I need to live on a boat that looks nice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Be sure to pack clean undies. Your time spent making it look good could be very detrimental to your health and welfare, not to mention the rescue service guys...
I have two safety projects left to do. New thru-deck rigging bolts, and a new boomkin. Everything else is cosmetic.
 

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Just a little more to think about.

No paint will resist contact with a hard object, like a dock or the outboard, etc. Those scratches often go right through. It's fenders rubbing, dock line chafe or the dinghy rubbing the sides that distinguishes the LP paints from acrylic. With LPs, you have zero damage to repair.

As for minor hard contact scratches (everyone is going to get one or two), I just had the yard touch them up with an artists brush. Up close, you can see the repair. From literally 3 ft away, you can't.
 

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I would go with RichH. Gel coat repair is a lot less work then painting. painting does not last. and when it gets older it looks a lot worse then old gelcoat. I would re-gelcoat before I would paint, it is less work and less expensive. I would never buy a boat that has been painted. just to much upkeep. if going off shore cruising do not waste the time and money on paint, you will come back with half of it gone.
 
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