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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Hunter 15, and while trailering to the launch, caught a tree branch that bent the mast in half in the middle.
I want to repair it, since a new or used one is not practical, since I live in N.E. Wyoming.
The interior is not round, making sleeving non-trivial. It appears that originally to make the mast a tube was split, the edges bent slightly to make the slot for the mainsail, and a straight bar was welded inside to hold the tube together. So I need an insert with about 1-1/4 wide flat edge on one side.
The easiest for me would be to make a solid wood insert to match the interior. Making an aluminum sleeve with a flat edge seems pretty tricky.
it’s an inshore day sailer that we sail on small lakes. Breaking a mast under sail would be inconvenient, but not a dire situation. With 21-1/2 foot mast and 107 sqft of sail, it seems rather under-powered relative to other boats.
Any thoughts on a wooden splice? I will have to cut off about 6” on each side of the break to remove damaged material.
Thank you!
 

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Discussion Starter #2
this is one side of the break. It’s pretty deformed. The edges of the slot are smooshed into the flat edge of the interior.
I will post another pic after I cut off the damaged part.
137360
 

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Realized I can buy a piece of tubing, so IF I can find someone to cut an weld a bar on the edge, I would have an inner sleeve the right size.
Assuming that’s doable, any thoughts on length (I need to fill a 12” gap plus inside support), shape of cut ( straight?), and attachment ( aluminum or stainless rivets)
Thanks for letting me air my thought process :rolleyes:

Speedy Metals 2" OD x 1.750" ID x .125" Wall 6061 Aluminum Round Tube
 

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That had to be a real gut punch, sorry to hear the trouble.

I suppose, where there is a will, there is a way. However, I have a few concerns.

Not all aluminum is created equal, so you'd need to be sure you were using the proper one.
I would think the fatigued metal, at the bend would need to be cut back, and the repair connected in two places, as a fill. Not feeling good for strength.
I'm thinking, if you tried to sell the boat, people would be pretty shy about a DIY mast repair.
I know it's a relatively small mast, but it can still kill you, if it comes down on your head.

Have you looked into biting the bullet and having a new mast shipped? If you have to hire an aluminum welder, which is very hard to weld, you may be well into a new mast cost anyway.
 

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I know of two mast that were sleeved then the seam welded. One was on a 30 ish foot catamaran and the other on a 23 Hunter. Both were repaired by a master metal worker.
Have you contacted Hunter for a quote on a new mast? Also there are plenty of small day sailors on Craigslist whose mast might be suitable.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I have learned a lot recently. Stumbled on a reference to Dwyer Masts, and lo and behold they 1. Made my mast; 2. Sell repair sleeve inserts; and 3. Sell masts for 1/3 the cost of one from Hunter. The Mighty Hunter shall sail the high seas again! Well, lakes anyway.
Thanks for your comments; I hope to get more input, for my benefit as well as others’
 

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I predict that shipping will cost more than the mast.
 

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The mast will probably have to ship by freight, but should easily fit inside a 53ft trailer. Freight cost is much more reasonable than UPS, et al. You would have to drive to the nearest freight terminal to get it, however.

Going to the boat manufacturer's source is always a good idea, but beware of a common catch. The OEMs often tweak something very minor to make it custom and justify it as "their part". Rather than buy a new transmission from Volvo for 4 or 5 grand, I sourced the identical transmission from ZF for under 2 grand. Same size, gear reduction and flywheel mating. Turns out, Volvo had them change the shaft coupling from male to female. Theoretically, I could have change the shaft side coupling, but being metric, it was hard to find in the US, so I had a puck machined and was good to go.

You might find an odd tweak like this on the mast will eat up some of the savings, but typically still comes out ahead.
 

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Glad you found a mast. I was going to suggest looking for an abandoned or neglected boat with a similar sized mast. Probably cheaper than a new mast.
 
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