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I faired ok the last two Ive been threw. Nothing scientific about how I preped though. Basically turned the boat into a giant spiders web along with fenders and the second one was on the hard and I had several ground spikes don't know what they are called look like a duck bill that when pounded in are a one way trip with a steel cable hanging out depending on the type each one put in 6 to 8" and depending on ground type mine in hard coral could hold more than needed.

Anyway if it can leak it will if it can blow away it will be gone if something else can hit it it will and doesn't matter how well you tie yours down if your neighbor doesn't then will end up same result.

I'm in as much of a hurricane hole as I can be though on an 80' wide canal 5 miles from the gulf up the caloosahatchee River but Irma still took my roof off.

Good luck to everyone and hopefully this will peter out beforehand.
 

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Beneteau 393
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At anchor or on a mooring (yes, I've done one of each 🙄) where you have the dinghy behind the boat: pull the plug and it it fill with water. It's less likely to flip.
 
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SV Raven
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Well… we’ll see how Phil and I respectively fair with our Ian preparations aboard the MacDill AFB marina.

i‘m hoping it isn‘t a repeat of Florence when i would have been just fine, except for the other guys boat that was poorly prepped that broke free and tried to mate with mine…
 

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My sail
Cloud Sky Boat Watercraft Vehicle
boat after Hurricane Sandy in NJ. No keel so really buoyant, sitting on stands not a cradle. Tied down with 2" Nylon straps to screw in anchors buried 3 feet deep the day before. Total cost of hurricane prep was $150. Insurance company gave back half of that. The 5 boats piled up against mine didn't actually touch anything other than the straps. There is a Hunter 27 literally balanced upright on it's keel against the pile of boats you see here. These boats are still in the marina unlike the dozens out in the neighborhood!


Cloud Sky Boat Watercraft Vehicle
 

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Just back from my marina in Charleston... All in all, we got lucky, the storm came in north of us, so no big storm surge.... But 80 mph wind is no joke..... One boat sank, and about a half dozen had gel coat or canvas damage... Lessons learned.... Take down ALL the canvas... That includes the jib off the furler!!!! At least 3 boats lost their jibs. One was flogging so hard it took out the lower spreaders, but the mast remained upright... The other lesson is tie down your neighbors boat as if it was your own... Almost all the damaged boats were damaged by a neighbor who didn't tie down so well.....
 

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Imexus 28 Trailable Powersailer
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I been through several cyclones (our equivilent to your hurricanes). My cruising yacht is trailable so it is kept at home away from trees and structures that can fall. I use star pickets driven deep into the ground and then lash the yacht and trailer down to the ground having removed all the loose rigging, furled headsail and cockpit canvas. No preparation is unexpected happening proof but I sleep a lot better regardless.
I have previously (when young) been out swimming trying to save others moored yachts broken from their moorings in relatively minor cyclonic tail end storms and recently seen the devastation caused by Cyclone Mary to the Whitsundays marinas and moored yachts there. Despite the best laid plans of mice and men it’s hard to deal with your loss when you have done everything right but others boats end up trashing yours.☹
 

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SV Raven
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This was my prep for Florence in Sept 2018. Boat was aboard MCAS Cherry Point marina; a pretty good hurricane hole off the Neuse River. As suggested above, not only was all canvas stripped, but I completely emptied and stripped the interior of everything not permanently affixed, batteries, cushions, compartment boards, etc, everything. I figured worst case if it got damaged and took water, there‘d be nothing floating around inside as a hazard to enter the boat, or unnecessarily ruined like all the mattresses and cushions, etc.

Doubled all the lines and found other places to add more. I was two weeks from taking command of my squadron and I figured the boat was probbaly not going to be there when I came back and with my looming responsibilities, my sailing would be on hold for a long time. Meanwhile, a much worse event would my boat breaking free and damaging someone else’s due to my negligent failure to prepare as best as possible.
 

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SV Raven
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And you can guess where this is going… Once we were allowed back on base, arriving at the marina was surreal. It received at least a 9’ surge. There were boats in the tree line, boats on the dock, boats in various stages of sinking or just masts above the water. And I would have been fine except for a gent who did marginal prep and left his canvas on.

Sure, it was a hurricane. Mother nature gets a vote. But still…
 

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SV Raven
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Fortunately aside from his deck hardware chewing up the port amidships and rub rail, and his forestay chattering up some of the foil sections of my furler, and a couple bent life line stancions, everything was eventually repaired. Unfortunately it took over a year given all the yards in the area took their own sever damage and then the backlog of work. But the silver lining was that during that time on the hard I pretty much we through every possible thing to fix or clean up when I had the time.

But now I am just hyper aware that when a major storm is approaching, it is one thing to prep my boat, but if someone else is doing a half ass job, I’ll happily lend some lines! And thank goodness I was home when Ian passed by!
 

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SV Raven
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Tempest, solid points. At the time I did not have an electric bilge pump - these Pearson 28-2s didn't have them from the factory, just the manual pump. I've since installed an electric pump and for Ian's passage made sure the batteries were fully charged and left in the boat...
 
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