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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was reading some of the stories on here about running aground. It made me wonder if anyone makes a small device of some kind with a little hydraulic ram on it like a foot of some kind that would get some traction on the shore and a rubber bumper to place on the hull and push. Maybe a little floating device with a gas engine you could lower in between the boat and the shore.
 

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We installed a couple of dozen small wheels from skateboards and we just power over any island or reef that gets in our way.
 

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Paul there have been several ideas that have been tried.

Not so much going aground but some full keel boats with tall bulkhead will bold a 4x4 to each side with a flat pad on the bottom so the boat can dry out at low tide.
It gives the boat a couple of legs to prevent it from tipping over.

There have been some commercial floating water-wings that you put under the bow or stern then inflate to lift your boat up. Saw them for sale never saw then used.

The old standby of course is a backhoe. It can be used to dig a trench then to push the boat while a tug pulls. I've seen the video of that process.

The first thing someone does when aground is to use the dinghy to run an anchor out to seaward.

That keeps the boat from being washed up higher on the beach.
Sometime with constant tension kept on that line the boat will work free.

Your idea might help in conjunction with the seaward anchor. It is the kind of idea where you you have to evaluate the situation and go home to get the right gear. It is highly unlikely you would be willing to carry the proper timber etc in the unlikely event you would need it and that the material you brought would be just right for the circumstances.


If you have a hydraulically operated center board then of course the solution might be easy in a soft grounding.

Let me know how you would have used your method to float this boat?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tBVkbsf6p-k
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Pretty much all of us have run aground more than a few times without needing to resort to any special inventions. There are enough other things to spend your time, money, and storage space. Coming from the Great Lakes I never realized how useful tides are for getting unstuck.
 

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Pretty much all of us have run aground more than a few times without needing to resort to any special inventions. There are enough other things to spend your time, money, and storage space. Coming from the Great Lakes I never realized how useful tides are for getting unstuck.
Except when you get stuck at high tide. :D

Paul T
 

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Easy to say that when you are perched on a pinnacle on a 6 meter tide with 30 meters under your rudder and maybe won't float till Febuary.Always travel on a rising tide.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Paul there have been several ideas that have been tried.

Not so much going aground but some full keel boats with tall bulkhead will bold a 4x4 to each side with a flat pad on the bottom so the boat can dry out at low tide.
It gives the boat a couple of legs to prevent it from tipping over.

There have been some commercial floating water-wings that you put under the bow or stern then inflate to lift your boat up. Saw them for sale never saw then used.

The old standby of course is a backhoe. It can be used to dig a trench then to push the boat while a tug pulls. I've seen the video of that process.

The first thing someone does when aground is to use the dinghy to run an anchor out to seaward.

That keeps the boat from being washed up higher on the beach.
Sometime with constant tension kept on that line the boat will work free.

Your idea might help in conjunction with the seaward anchor. It is the kind of idea where you you have to evaluate the situation and go home to get the right gear. It is highly unlikely you would be willing to carry the proper timber etc in the unlikely event you would need it and that the material you brought would be just right for the circumstances.


If you have a hydraulically operated center board then of course the solution might be easy in a soft grounding.

Let me know how you would have used your method to float this boat?

I think it would work but probably slowly. I imagine you could bury a two by six about four fee to five feet long in the sand and push off of it or some such thing. Not sure how he got the boat back in the water as it doesn't show what pulled it. It's better if you can get a tug or something but if no help is around a thing like I'm thinking of would definitely be a help.
 

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Assuming your hydraulically operated center board was completely in the raised position when you run aground.....how would you use it to refloat the boat? Or should you keep it down about a foot as you're cruising in shallow water just in case you run aground...you can raise it?
 

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I was reading some of the stories on here about running aground. It made me wonder if anyone makes a small device of some kind with a little hydraulic ram on it like a foot of some kind that would get some traction on the shore and a rubber bumper to place on the hull and push. Maybe a little floating device with a gas engine you could lower in between the boat and the shore.
I'm not sure what your thinking is about "the shore." I've certainly run aground my share of times, but never close to the shoreline. Rigging hydraulics between the boat and the bottom is something that really should be done by professionals. Consider what might happen if the boat shifted while you were underwater and you got stuck?

Where are you going to keep all this stuff?

Not so much going aground but some full keel boats with tall bulkhead will bold a 4x4 to each side with a flat pad on the bottom so the boat can dry out at low tide. It gives the boat a couple of legs to prevent it from tipping over.
Yacht legs are commercially available and work on many fin keel boats.

There have been some commercial floating water-wings that you put under the bow or stern then inflate to lift your boat up. Saw them for sale never saw then used.
Good stuff. Used by commercial salvors and dive companies. Very robust and--importantly--controllable. Salvors carry air compressors anyway so float bags are an easy additional capability. They are helpful as lift bags to recover items on the bottom and, pumping water into them, as weights to adjust trim and heel.

The old standby of course is a backhoe. It can be used to dig a trench then to push the boat while a tug pulls. I've seen the video of that process.
Right. Best if wooden dunnage is available for the bucket to bear against.

The first thing someone does when aground is to use the dinghy to run an anchor out to seaward.
I think that is usually the third thing. First is swearing followed by fruitless attempts to power off. THEN you run an anchor out to deeper water. *grin*
 

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Assuming your hydraulically operated center board was completely in the raised position when you run aground.....how would you use it to refloat the boat? Or should you keep it down about a foot as you're cruising in shallow water just in case you run aground...you can raise it?
Some folks do exactly as you mentioned. If they are going dead slow in mud , not rocks, they can use the keel to "feel" the bottom.

Probably not an awful idea if done very carefully under the right conditions.
 

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I think that must have been extremely soft, loose sand or the video was digitally altered?

Paul T
I took the video and do not not know how to alter video.

The sand was regular hard New England CT sand.

The boat pulling was a standard little Boat US tow boat maybe 100 HP single prop motor.

No one was more surprised than me than it worked. I was amazed at how much pull they were able to generate.
 

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I took the video and do not not know how to alter video.

The sand was regular hard New England CT sand.

The boat pulling was a standard little Boat US tow boat maybe 100 HP single prop motor.

No one was more surprised than me than it worked. I was amazed at how much pull they were able to generate.
I have seen several rescue/salvage/re-float attempts on sailboats on San Francisco's ocean beach, a few by a tow boat off shore, weather allowing. I can't remember any of them being successful. All I remember was them bringing in a bull dozer to drag what was left to where a crane could pick it up & put it on a truck.

The owner of the boat in your video was lucky to get it turned & out without any apparent damage, good for him. I didn't think what I saw was possible.

Paul T
 

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Of course, when all else fails you can go with the Oregon Dept. of Transportation solution...


Still a classic after all these years. Don't believe it?

snopes.com: Oregon Whale Disposal

My favorite quote? "The dynamite was planted primarily on the leeward side of the big mammal so that most of the remains would be blown to the sea." Nautical and very funny!
 
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