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I recently purchased a 1977 30' Irwin citation. I dont have any prefious experience sailing, and am registered for courses next year as well as i am going to keep the boat at a sailing club so that i can try to pick as many brains as i can for info.

The boat had leaks before the previous owner and allthough he fixed the leaks, there was a good amount of damage done to the galley. I am currently pulling every board that i can to replace and check.

I do have a couple questions though.

The sidestays for the mast go through the deck and into what used to be a 2 x 8. It is completely rotted on the starboard side. I have put git-rot into the whole section but am wondering what else should i do? The previous owner had mentioned he was going to remove the old wood and replace the 2 x 8. This does seem to help me sleep better at night, but someone else told me just to use the git-rot.

I would think it would be in my best interest to put a roller furling up but ive done a fair amount of seariching and due to my inexperience, i have to ask the following question..

Do i need to step the mast down in order to install roller furling?
 

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I would step mast, but not sure it needs to be done, yard may be able to do it without stepping. Stay should be replaced with new before installing foil over it.
 

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Second Jim's concern about 'git rot'.. this sounds like a necessary structural repair.. and future leak elimination.

It is not necessary to drop the mast to install roller furling. The mast can be temporarily stayed with a spare halyard, and the rigger can go up the mast as necessary. I'd suggest you replace the forestay while you're at it (Furlex usually supplies a new one) unless you have records showing the standing rigging has been recently replaced. Expect to pay something on the order of $2-3K installed with the necessary sail modifications.

Oh... Congrats on your boat and welcome to Sailnet!
 

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No, do not use git rot on that wood. You have to replace it. Do not sail the boat until you do.

Some furling systems it is better for the mast to come down but not always necessary. Find a local rigger to help you on this.
 

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Adding the furller was one of the best adds I have done, but you may want to hold off on upgrades till you have fully assessed and sailed the boat. You may find with a boat that has a rotted chain plate mount has other neglect. The mast my need to be stepped to address wiring issues.
 
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Photos may help.

Some terminology: Standing rigging holds the mast up (keeps it standing). Shrouds are the wires on each side which hold the mast up - you probably have 3 each side. Stays are front and back (forestay at the front, backstay at the back). Shrouds are connected to the hull using chainplates, which are normally bolted to a structural element.

You got a full survey before buying the boat, right?

If the shrouds are indeed attached to a rotten piece of 2x8, I would not sail until it is repaired. The forces on a shroud in moderate winds are enormous; if the chainplate tears out, the rig will come down. This would be bad. Also, stainless steel doesn't rust unless it is trapped in a damp, airless environment - like bolted or buried in a piece of rotted wood - so your chainplate may also be compromised. Any small crack in a chainplate is red lights and sirens!

Please do not sail until the situation has been professionally addressed.

As for a roller furler, there are strong feelings pro and con. On the positive side, it is definitely convenient. On the negative side it may prevent you from getting the best shape from your sail - so racing boats rarely have furlers, cruising boats often do. I would suggest that your priority should be to ensure the boat is safe and dry - standing rigging has been checked, essential maintenance completed. Then, if you have any money left over, look at a roller furler.

If you do decide to install one, the mast does not have to be removed - but the forestay does. So you need to be sure the mast is supported during this process. A professional installer may be able to advise.

Good luck!
 

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Mookie, check Yahoo groups for the Irwin Owners groups, there are a couple.
There is even a face book page.

Your 30 is quite a bit different from my 38 but I think you've got quiet a bit going on that needs to be addressed before that boat is safe to sail.

Chuck
1987 Irwin 38 CC MkII
 

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Welcome to the forum. Good sailor folk here (knowledgable too)! Pictures help the helpers more than anything!

Dave
 

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Sail the boat for a while before you invest in roller furling. You may find that you prefer having the ability to readily change sails to wind conditions then the ability to put away the boat 5 minutes faster at the end of the day. That is realistically the tradeoff made with roller furling vs hank-on.

My first boat had hank-on sails and my current one has (brand new) roller furling. I'm not sure that the investment in roller furling was the right one for me.
 

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Classic case of "The happiest days of a sailors life is the day he buys his boat and the day he sells his boat"

The prefious owner probably got the better end of the deal.
 

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I have just looked at all the Irwin Citation 30's on Yachtworld. I have not seen one with a "2 x 8" used for chainplate attachment. Would like to see a pic as others have mentioned. As some other threads on Sailnet have shown Irwin's chainplate attachments have been suspect on other models as well.

GitRot doesn't repair anything structural - it just petrifies the rot. I also agree it should be your first priority before sailing to repair the chainplate attachment properly.
 

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Congrats on the new boat!

When got my boat I felt pressured to upgrade my boat to the currently popular rigging setup of roller furling, all lines led to cockpit, etc. only to later learn that I actually prefer sailing with the simpler rig my boat already had.

Don't feel pressured to upgrade/modify the rigging until all of the safety maintenance issues are fixed, you have money to burn, and have sailed on boats rigged different ways.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I don't have any pictures of the section but I will be sure to get some as well as have someone look at it to find what repairs are going to take
 

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A minor point; with 2 posts, Sailnet is not going to permit Mookie to post pictures. We will have to get the picture through accurate verbal descriptions and good pointed questioning.

Welcome to boasting and Sailnet. Participating in repairing your boat either as a helper or a primary repairer is a great way of learning your boat. Ask questions and solicit help but don't feel stymied by a large volume of seemingly contradictory responses. Sometimes you have to get a feeling about what is correct and doable and just get started!

Good luck and welcome.

Tod
 

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I had a chain plate break in half, while sailing an older Catalina 27, one day. Sounded like a shotgun going off nearby. Luckily the winds weren't too heavy. As soon as I realized what happened, I was able to turn her onto the other tack, taking the pressure off of the rigging on the broken side. Substituted a halyard as a temporary stay, doused all sails and limped home on the Atomic 4 motor.

Even though I had a professional survey, the problem went unnoticed until it broke.

The chain plate had deteriorated right where it touched the decking. I replaced it and was back sailing in a week or so. Now that I think back on it..I don't remember if I replaced BOTH chain-plates (on either side) or not. If I didn't, I certainly should have. It was 30 years ago, so my memory is long gone on the details, but I remember that sound!

Not a condition you want to put yourself in. Get a pro to look at the problem and do not sail until you do! regards, Rich
 

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If it was 30 years ago the Catalina 27 was not more than 12 years old.:)

The Catalina 27 came to life in 1971

12 years is a very short life for a chainplate.
 

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You might be more correct than I on the exact number of years. As I recall, it was 10 years old when I bought it. 30 years ago may have only been been 20/25 years ago.

Loved that boat and, even now, wish I had never sold it. I had too much to do at the office to use it enough..... at the time. Darn!
regards, Rich

p.s. Hmm...let's see 1971 to 2013 is 42 years... it might have been nearly 30 years ago???
 

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A minor point; with 2 posts, Sailnet is not going to permit Mookie to post pictures. We will have to get the picture through accurate verbal descriptions and good pointed questioning.
Good point, Tod - but many people work around it by putting the pictures up on another site, typically a free photo hosting service, and posting a link.
 

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Ditto on holding off on upgrades for now.

There are two things every sailor has to learn:
1. how to sail well
2. how to manage the maintenance of your vessel

Don't discount the importance of boat "management". That old 30 footer has some more surprises for you besides the chainplate attachments. Save your capital for these inevitable surprises.

Sounds like a PROPER repair of the chainplates is your first order of business. The loads on your shrouds are considerable, and if one of them fails, it could be inconvenient at the least, and expensive and dangerous at most. Heck, you can pretty much count on expensive.

Some folks maintain their boat with a phone and a checkbook, while others, like me, prefer to do their own maintenance for the savings, the satisfaction, and the assurance that the job's been done and done right.

A hank on jib on a 30 footer is reasonably easy to manage, and as others have already mentioned, it allows you to swap out headsails to suit conditions.

Good luck with your new boat. There is no better resource than sailnet. This site has an incredible accumulated database, so make good use of the search function.
 
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