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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a new 6 HP Mercury outboard and was surprised about the winterizing recommendation.

The booklet says to put fresh gas in with stabilizer then run it for a few minutes to get it to temperature.

Pull a plug and put some oil in the cylinder.

Change lower unit oil

Change engine oil.

Lube moving parts and wax outside

No running the engine dry or fogging or draining the carb.

I asked about that and he said those were old recommendations and now they say to keep the carb full with stabilized gas to prevent drying out of seals etc.

Just thought I would pass that along.
 

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We have a Mercury 15 Hp 2-stroke, bought new, and I have called Mercury Marine as well--any number of things, more than a number of times....
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The thing I thought interesting is that the popular wisdom sees to be to run the carb dry and drain it.

Apparently the Mfr. doesn't agree anymore.
 

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I bought a new 6 HP Mercury outboard and was surprised about the winterizing recommendation.

The booklet says to put fresh gas in with stabilizer then run it for a few minutes to get it to temperature.

Pull a plug and put some oil in the cylinder.

Change lower unit oil

Change engine oil.

Lube moving parts and wax outside

No running the engine dry or fogging or draining the carb.

I asked about that and he said those were old recommendations and now they say to keep the carb full with stabilized gas to prevent drying out of seals etc.

Just thought I would pass that along.
You talked to the wrong guy at Mercury. I didn't know better and I didn't run the engine dry. It was a new engine, less than a hour of run time since purchased and less than a month old. It didn't run right after that so I took it into a Mercury authorized repair shop. they charged me $200 to fix it and said the warranty did not apply because I didn't run the engine dry.

I don't care what your guy on the phone said. I'm out $200 and Mercury refused to cover warranty. I've run dry ever since and no more problems.

The propane engines came out 6 months after I got mine. I'd buy the propane engine over the gas engine in a heartbeat if given the choice. BTW, those little ones are not made by Mercury. They just put their name on it.

G. Jackson
 

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The only problem I have ever had was when I forgot to drain the carb for the winter, what a mess!!. However, your Mercury rep may have a point in keeping the carb full? If I haven't drained because I am going out within a week or so, I give the primer bulb a few squeezes every day or so.

Draining is easy & takes little time. :D

Paul T
 

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You talked to the wrong guy at Mercury. I didn't know better and I didn't run the engine dry. It was a new engine, less than a hour of run time since purchased and less than a month old. It didn't run right after that so I took it into a Mercury authorized repair shop. they charged me $200 to fix it and said the warranty did not apply because I didn't run the engine dry.

I don't care what your guy on the phone said. I'm out $200 and Mercury refused to cover warranty. I've run dry ever since and no more problems.

The propane engines came out 6 months after I got mine. I'd buy the propane engine over the gas engine in a heartbeat if given the choice. BTW, those little ones are not made by Mercury. They just put their name on it.

G. Jackson
Did your owners manual say to do that? If not they should cover it. Now things like this do change over time, with changes in fuel additives and the fuel itself. So what may have been good practice may no longer apply and in fact may be bad for it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
Did your owners manual say to do that? If not they should cover it. Now things like this do change over time, with changes in fuel additives and the fuel itself. So what may have been good practice may no longer apply and in fact may be bad for it.
That is what I'm worried about.

Here are the pages from the manual:


 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Sometimes, it is good to follow instructions I think it said "Drain"? :D

Paul T
The way I read it it says to drain any alcohol un-stabilized fuel then run it with stabilized fuel and leave the carb full.

Do you get something else?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I talked to the local engine repair guy and he said he has tried both the drain and dry and the stablized fuel over the winter and has had both methods work and fail come spring.

What he is doing now is to find some E0 gas, which he will not share with me, and put stabilizer in that and leave the carb full.

So far best results.

I can not find any E0 fuel in CT except for TruFuel which specifically says it is only for air cooled engines.

I'm still looking.
 

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I talked to the local engine repair guy and he said he has tried both the drain and dry and the stablized fuel over the winter and has had both methods work and fail come spring.

What he is doing now is to find some E0 gas, which he will not share with me, and put stabilizer in that and leave the carb full.

So far best results.

I can not find any E0 fuel in CT except for TruFuel which specifically says it is only for air cooled engines.

I'm still looking.
Check out airports they may sell a couple of gallons. I was surprised to see it in the southern tier NY. Guess they use it in snowmobiles.

Sent from my DROID RAZR using Tapatalk
 

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The propane engines came out 6 months after I got mine. I'd buy the propane engine over the gas engine in a heartbeat if given the choice. BTW, those little ones are not made by Mercury. They just put their name on it.

G. Jackson
Yes, the smaller Mercurys are rebadged Tohatsus, which are excellent outboards.
 

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I talked to the local engine repair guy and he said he has tried both the drain and dry and the stablized fuel over the winter and has had both methods work and fail come spring.

What he is doing now is to find some E0 gas, which he will not share with me, and put stabilizer in that and leave the carb full.

So far best results.

I can not find any E0 fuel in CT except for TruFuel which specifically says it is only for air cooled engines.

I'm still looking.
It takes a lot longer to remove, clean, & replace a carb than to drain it, which just takes a minute. :D

Paul T
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
Apparently the problem with the drain idea is that no matter how carefully you drain a carburetor since some of the jets are just a few thousands's of an inch they can get clogged up either by something not draining properly or picking up moisture from the air. Not every time of course but it happens frequently enough that some professionals are no longer recommending that process.

Leaving the carburetor full with E10 fuel for the winter is almost certainly going to make it inoperable in the spring.

Running the engine until it stops does not seem to be good enough as there is still quite a bit of fuel in the carburetor. If this is E10 fuel you will probably have starting problems in the spring.

Leaving the carburetor full for the winter with additive is recommended by Mercury. They do not mention the kind of gas.

Draining the carburetor will work often but not every time for every engine.

Running race gas E0 causes the least amount of problems.

I am going to put half gallon of race gas E0 in my tank with Quicksilver additive.
Run the motor in a barrel for 10 minutes
Spray a little fogging oil in the corroborator the last minute or so just because I can.
Stop the motor and unplug the tank and save the leftover gas for the generator if needed.
Leave the carburetor full of E0 fuel with additive
Pull the plug and put some motor oil in the cylinder and replace the plug.
Pull the start cord very slowly a couple times to distribute the oil.
Pull the start cord until resistance is felt to close the valves
Drain and replace the oil.
Drain and replace the lower unit oil
Hit all the moving control parts with Quicksilver grease.
Remove and reassemble the prop.
Wax the cover.
Store the engine on my outboard stand in the garage.

Just to be on the safe side I will probably pick up 5 gallons of the VP every spring and fall even though it probably lasts a year or more. Next time I'll probably get the 5 gal drum.

I'm not saying that everything above is necessary. What does seem to be true after interviewing about 6 experts is that the the above procedure is as full proof as is possible although it is probably over kill.
But since the difference between a sloppy job and my idea job is only a couple minutes I'll figure I'll just do it all.

Other than reading it a bedtime story that is all I can think I can do for it.

Searching for E0 gas does not get many hits in CT. When I searched on VP racing fuels I found an outboard repair shop and a small tractor, snow blower, lawnmower shop that sells it near me. It costs about $13 gallon.

Any comments are welcome.
 

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It's easy to make a simple thing too complicated. I have one of these motors. I drain the gas out of the carb and stand it up in my basement. That's all you really have to do. The oil change is good too but the carb is the main thing. Also - believe me now - change the little inline fuel filter at the front of the engine. EVERY YEAR. And never ever keep the gas that is in the tank. I put it either in our old car or in a lawn mower.

For what it's worth we have done this for many years and get pretty good results. The carbs are otorios for plugging up jets.


I have motorcycles and they get the same treatment. Shut the fuel of and drain the carbs. Antique motorcycle collectors will always keep their carbs dry and they keep those carbs in great conditions for many decades.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
Pretty much the same as what Sal does. I have had many outboards & motorcycles over the years. Draining the carbs & storing the motors upright, and using an additive has worked for me. With your plan, your motor should be more than happy. :)

Paul T
Except that now the latest wisdom seems to be to not drain the carb.

That is the reason I posted this as everyone I know always drained the carb before putting it away.
But now both the manufacture and two repair shops are recommending keeping it full but with stabilizer.

I don't expect folks to do anything different than what has been working for them but just thought it was interesting.
 

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Except that now the latest wisdom seems to be to not drain the carb.

That is the reason I posted this as everyone I know always drained the carb before putting it away.
But now both the manufacture and two repair shops are recommending keeping it full but with stabilizer.

I don't expect folks to do anything different than what has been working for them but just thought it was interesting.
As long as you keep it full, that may work. If, on the rare occasion I don't drain, I give the primer bulb a squeeze every other day or so to keep the bowl full.

Sometime back, I did a test with on old carburetor, filled up the bowl & let it set for about a month or so. When I opened it up there was absolutely nothing in the bowl, perfectly clean. Not sure about the jets as I didn't try running it, just a visual inspection.

I have always used a stabilizer & with draining, have had no problems. Let us know how the "keep full" routine works.

Thanks for the feedback, Paul T
 
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