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· Islander Yacht Fan
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
An Introduction
Some of you have seen previous posts and replies I've submitted. I thought it appropriate to introduce myself as a way of framing this post (or series).
I am a project management professional - in fact its my job. I've always been list and task oriented, and after spending several years as a software engineer it was a natural progression to move into project management from there - I've been managing multi million dollar software development and IT project efforts ever since (over 25 years and counting).
So why does this matter?
The Joy
As many of us have, I bought a project boat. I'd like to say I could have afforded to by a newer nicer boat, but the reality is I bought the boat I thought I could afford, and invested sweat equity to make up the difference. Its a club I'm certain a lot of us are in, given the community of DIY boat restorers on this site.
The joy felt as I piloted my prize home on an unknown engine and with the emergency tiller was nothing compared to what we experienced on her maiden voyage (see previous post with same name). Still, in the nearly 5 hour trip home, I was filled with dreams of all the potential, all the new bits and sailing gear I'd buy, the feel of her helm as she was under sail. As it is often the case, it would be nearly 3 yrs for that potential to be realised.
...and the work begins
The reality sets in - your new (to you) boat sits at the dock or in a yard, or in my case, in my yard. Its likely a mess, as project boats are want to be - elsewise they would not have been so cheap. Some people have a habit of jumping right in, taking off and getting discouraged as the work mounts and progress is hard to find. Some of these boats you'll recognise from Craigslist adds where the price is often equal to "just move it" or "some storage fees may apply". This is in part because some folks see the potential in a project boa, but fail to understand the effort required to realise that potential - this understanding can only come from planning the work, and executing the plan.
I'm not saying you need to be a project manager. I am saying there are some tools I'd like to share to make this project easier to complete, help keep costs in check and help to keep you motivated to get to the joy at the end of the rainbow. In the following posts, I will try to share what I've learned and applied in hopes of helping you reach your goal. Stay tuned for Part II of this series Project Boat - Part II - Plan your work.
Thanks for reading,
Eric
 

· Islander Yacht Fan
Joined
·
60 Posts
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22
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I just looked at your blog - very impressive and extensive work and a beautiful boat - I have long admired the Alberg 35 -and yours is a great example of the breed - shoot me an email sometime - would love to converse about our projects - I'm originally from New England as well - and like you have rebuilt 2 old homes from the beams up, as well as restored a classic Cape Cod Highlander sail boat.

That said - your project is a complete restoration - something far more involved than the type of work I completed. I know you had a very involved plan to complete in your work. My notes are more targeted at the folks who are somewhere between "bottom feeders" and your efforts at classic boat restoration. My goal is to help more people rescue plastic boats from where they lay, clean, fix, upfit, and enjoy them as they were intended. Thank ou for your comments!
 
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