SailNet Community banner

21 - 27 of 27 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,769 Posts
Would an annual single coat of varnish keep the finish look great "indefinitely" or would be be too built up? Would a good rub down with ScotchBrite be the prep needed on 1 yr old varnish which essentially still looks good?
I took my cockpit table to bare wood some number of years ago. Probably more than I realize now. I take the table off every other year, sand it with 220 grit and then put a couple of top coats. I think the sanding takes off about what I put on and will work indefinitely, unless I let it become damaged.

I did have a guest close the leaf against one of it's supports and split a piece off the edge, along the grain. It was heartbreaking to find. They didn't fess up, but I know who did it. I took it home, epoxied the broken piece in and clamped it. Then I rebuilt the split edges, with a little varnish at a time, until it was proud to the surrounding finished varnish. It took several layers, but maybe not the full 10. Once it was proud, I then sanded everything level and put a tooth on the rest and top coated. You literally couldn't find it right now. Very time consuming, but varnish is repairable.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SanderO

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,732 Posts
Learned a trick from a buddy who does it for a living. For maintenance one of difficulties is where you have failures, you need to sand down, feather, and build many coats. For those areas he uses Awlgrip m3131 which allows for hot coats with no sanding in-between if done close enough in time. Then he finishes with a couple of annual flood coats of Epithanes ( disclaimer - this is a New England schedule for a seasonal boat). Results are indistinguishable from just building with Epi, and saves lots of time waiting out hardening, sanding cycles during the build up. Still, its varnish. Not easy, not cheap in either time or money. I keep saying I'll buy a boat with no wood outside. I keep lying to myself.
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
Learned a trick from a buddy who does it for a living. For maintenance one of difficulties is where you have failures, you need to sand down, feather, and build many coats. I keep saying I'll buy a boat with no wood outside. I keep lying to myself.
The new total boat varnishes are no sand between, but you need to let dry before recoating, still able to get 3 coats per day for the Gleem and 5 for the Halycon. Not sure how it would work for repairs. My S2 7.9 has only hatchboards and a tiller for wood outside. Hatchboards now varnished. I was going to patch up the tiller but this thread has convinced me to take it back to bare wood and make it pretty.
136418
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
"I keep saying I'll buy a boat with no wood outside."
I adopted that policy on my 50th birthday "No more wood in the weather!!", last 2 boats have been nothing but stainless and plastic.
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,494 Posts
"I keep saying I'll buy a boat with no wood outside."
I adopted that policy on my 50th birthday "No more wood in the weather!!", last 2 boats have been nothing but stainless and plastic.
My current boat came that way, except for the hatch boards the previous owner had replaced the wood with metal options topsides.

I have a question for prepping teak. On my hatchboards I took a heat gun and scraper to remove the varnish then sanded off the next layer of "varnish undercoat" (not sure what to call the next layer). I saw a video of an old New Englander Boatwright that used a plane blade to scrape the next layer off.

I have 6 pieces of wood I need to prep 2 tillers, rudders, etc. I just received some Snappy Teak. Can I use that to remove the old varnish? After scraping off the first layer or after sanding or planing off the second layer?

Photo of the tiller is two posts up.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,371 Posts
Discussion Starter #26
My current boat came that way, except for the hatch boards the previous owner had replaced the wood with metal options topsides.

I have a question for prepping teak. On my hatchboards I took a heat gun and scraper to remove the varnish then sanded off the next layer of "varnish undercoat" (not sure what to call the next layer). I saw a video of an old New Englander Boatwright that used a plane blade to scrape the next layer off.

I have 6 pieces of wood I need to prep 2 tillers, rudders, etc. I just received some Snappy Teak. Can I use that to remove the old varnish? After scraping off the first layer or after sanding or planing off the second layer?

Photo of the tiller is two posts up.
No. Snappy Teak is a cleaner and a brightener for bare wood. As much as I hate to say this, I think it would be best to sand the varnish off at this point to prevent damaging the wood by gouging it with a scraper or burning it with a heat gun.
 
21 - 27 of 27 Posts
Top