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Im trying to figure out how to plumb the drain for my ice box. i rebuilt it re insulate it but the original icebox never had a drain in the bottom only a hole near the top. Im now stuck to figure out how exactly im going to drain the icebox. attached is a pic of what it looks like looking from the aft towards the bow from in the engine compartment.



since the drain is only 1-2" above where the through hull is i know if i just plum it right up the water will just back fill into the ice box. I could install a loop but any water in the ice box wont work its way up the loop.

What i have thought of is 2 options.

1. fiberglass in a lower section to fit a bilge pump in for the water to flow to then pump the water up and connect it to the sink line

2. install the drain to a inline pump with a shut off valve and have the pump push the water up through a loop bove the water line and back down to the through hull and "T" it off with the sink

let me know and any other options i would be open to
 

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Mine just drains into the bilge, the bilge pump pumps it out but I have a deep bilge.
 

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Mine is...? perhaps 5 feet? I have an Alberg 35, full keel. The bilge is dry. One night the bilge pump suddenly came on, ran for a minute or two, shut off; I thought there must be a leak so I got up to check. I couldn't find any leak and then it dawned on me that I had put a bag of ice in the icebox that morning; I checked and sure enough the bag was now empty, had tipped over and the water was gone.
 

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Both our current and previous boat had the ice-box drain plumbed to a hand pump at the sink, allowing you to pump when appropriate down the sink drain.

Doesn't draining ice-box water into the bilge end up smelling bad?

I wouldn't want the ice box to either drain or be pumped automatically. I find some level of ice-water useful for keeping things in well-sealed containers cold.
 

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Run the ice box drain downhill all the way to the edge of the cabinet and to a petcock. Keep it closed except when you wish to drain it. Use a container to catch the water. The bilge is a bad idea as it will stink.
 

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The drain should have a loop, valve, plug, or something to keep the cold air from flowing down into the bilge. Your fridge unit will run less and/or ice will last longer.
 

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If you run a drain line up to just below your sink, you could mount a hand pump just below the sink. Cut a "T" into your sink drain line just below the sink, and pump the ice box through the T out the drain.

It's all above the waterline.
 

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Do you have a shower and where does it drain? There is often a separate sump for showers on boats to keep the grey water out of the bilge. the ice box on my Cape Dory MS300 drains to the shower sump which has a separate overboard pump. As a earlier poster mentioned you should avoid the ice box drain going into the bilge.
 

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I have the same set up as mr f. It just takes a minute or so to remove any accumulated water and kind of forces you to pay attention to what is going on in the ice box. Having any water from the ice box or the shower drain into the bilge is a real bad idea.
 

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Here is a different view on ice box drains. Our columbia ice box does have a drain that drains into the engine compartment bilge. I actually plugged the drain so that the ice water remained in the ice box. Guess what. The ice took much longer to melt, thus the food stayed colder for a longer period of time. It made a huge difference. When the ice water got to a level that need emptying, I used a manual pump and emptied it into a bucket. Works great for us. Try it, you'll like it
 

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My Sabre is set up with a hand pump that ties into the sink drain as Mr. F & TomMaine have described. Not only does it keep the condensate out of the bilge but anything else that gets spilled in the ice box. It also provides a trap at the ice box drain so all the cooler air from the ice box doesn't settle into the bilge. It does become one more thing you need to winterize.

Bob
 

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If tying in under the sink,pay attention to where the waterline is. Could fill the ice box from outside. Loop and pump (foot, hand or electric under ice box and then up higher and down to sink .The cold you pump out is easily replaced by lugging more ice down the dock.
 

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I use ice so get a lot of water, have a whale foot pump that pumps it into the sink. Added advantage is when I want to add some more beverages I put them in the sink and let them sit in the cold ice water before putting them in the ice box.
 

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No way I would want a gravity drain to an open thru hull. At the least, you would have to keep it closed while underway. Too easy to forget. A foot pump to a location above the waterline is a minimum, if you don't drain to the bilge.

The bilge drain is not a great idea, but some are better/worse than others. If you have a large open bilge that is going to collect gallons of water over days and days, before pumping overboard, it will stink horribly. In our case, the lowest portion of the bilge holds less than a half gallon of water. The air conditioning condensation and both fridges drain there, so the pump cycles the water out frequently. That is a downside in itself, for pump longevity, but it keeps the stink to a min. I do have to flush cleaning solution once in a while.
 

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I'm surprised that many complicate icebox draining with pumps, manual or electric, and even a dedicated through hull in some cases. As long as the bottom of the icebox is above the cabin sole all that is needed is a hose fitting to a cabinet edge and a petcock. Keep it closed except when draining into a container and no cold air is lost. Simple is always better.
 

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Without a trap, valve or some other means of stopping your cold air from draining from the box, you will use a lot more ice than necessary. If you have just a straight drain without a means of stopping air flow from the box, the denser cold air will escape through the drain and warm air will replace it, melting your ice in short order or causing your refrigeration system to run a LOT more than it needs to.

Have FUN!
O'
 

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The best thing I have ever seen was when the ice box drain went to a foot pump and a faucet on the sink. This way you have icewater blocking the line, except when you pump it into the sink--with the stopper in the drain, so the icewater now keeps drinks or food cold as a "day box" so you don't have to open the icebox to get something cold.

Pumped out once in the morning and once after lunch, it is often enough to keep the ice box dry and to get "free" cooling for the stuff in the sink. Fairly simple to install, no holes in the hull, no extra manual valves, no water in the bilge.
 
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