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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
1972 Irwin 28 have read alot that the factory icebox is pretty much useless and mine dosent even have a drain. Just wondering if others have rebuilt their ice box what did you do to improve it. Im not upgrading to a cooling system going to keep it ice cooled.
 

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If you have access to exterior, add as much insulation as is room
for. I did not have exterior room so I added insulation to interior
using Owens Corning pink foam. Use as thick as you see fit to
lose inside volume. Important to seal along edges and I made a
2" foam lid inside cooler (hinged to fit inside narrower cover of
icebox.) World of difference. I also make my own block ice,
much longer lasting than cubes. Some blocks are made inside
half or full gallon containers which are used for nice cool drinking water when thawed. Really should have drain as well prefably not
draining into bilge.
 

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Thea,

If it's available, look for nanogel or aerogel to insulate. R7/inch and you pour it in. I'm planning on doing the same but timing is everything.
 

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Thea,

If it's available, look for nanogel or aerogel to insulate. R7/inch and you pour it in. I'm planning on doing the same but timing is everything.
Good suggestion on the Cryogel/Aerogel. I think I heard that 2" of the stuff is equal to 12" of foam insulation.

I bough some sheets off eBay. Was not too expensive.

Regards,
Brad
 

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We use Aerogel in . . . granule . . . form to fill cellular polycarbonate sheet. This gives a 1" poly sheet 60% light transmission with the same R-factor as a 2X4 insulated wall. The Aerogel is like frozen smoke. A tablespoon of the stuff in your hand looks like you are literally holding thin smoke and weighs almost nothing. The chunks are about the size of rock salt. It is hydrophobic so it wont hold any water. I plan on building my icebox out of fiberlgass on a plexiglass mold (for smoothness) then set it in place and carefully pour the "gel" around it. I may need to drill entry ports to do this. Then, I'll replace the top of that part of the galley with Formica, or something like it. That will cover any ports I had to drill. Best laid plans anyway.
 

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Nigel Calder was talking a bit about the relationship between refrigeration and energy conservation in the lecture I attended a few weeks ago. He really knows his stuff and has a few books that talk about different setups for different applications.

One in particular explores the science, math and application behind it. I think its called Refrigeration for Pleasure Boats.
 

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DonScribner,

as I understand, Aerogel is fairly hydrophilic. Given that you're 'pouring it in' to spaces, do you have to do some sort of vapor-barrier to account for that? I thought the deal with the 'sheets' is that they can't be perforated for that reason
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Aspects Aerogel makes a sheet called cryogenic z I think and it has a vapor barrier applied to it does it need a space or can it be Compacted together I just want a good ice box lol

Sent from my HTC One using Tapatalk
 

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the use of aerogel is intriguing. I would like to rebuild my refrigeration box that has a seafrost mechanical drive/cold plate. Can you purchase aerogel directly thru Cabot?
 

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I don't think so. There are 4 companies that own the rights of distributorship nationally, mine being one of the. I'm planning on a 5 fingered discount. Sheets of aerogel filled glazing are sometimes damaged and sit around. It might take a while to get enough.
 

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I mix and add it in "small" batches. I wouldn't take much. 32 0z. paper cups as mixing containers with each pre measured component poured in and quickly mixed, then poured into the void. Temp is important for maximum expansion. I use an ir temp gun to make sure the contact surfaces are warm enough and won't cool it down. I have never had a curing problem. I have been working with boat repairs for 40 years and have never seen or heard of a soggy core of a pour. I am working in Maine and not Arizona so moisture is not a concern for me. A box of disposable gloves lives in my shop and are highly recommended. If you do it in stages you can re use the cups and the stirring sticks. I carefully swipe out the reacting batch with the stick as I pour and wipe the stick off before it cures. If it does cure a sharp knife restores your stick. The 2 lb. / sq. ft. foam is plenty strong!
 

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I took another route in my Catalina 25. Ice box is too small for much so put cork in drain and use for dry storage. Now I use a cooler that sits under the table, which is out of our way. It is secured to the bulkhead. This works well for the two of us.
 
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