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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Reading a related thread on ICW resources, which best direct people to Active Captain and other real time resources, I recalled a common occurrence.

Often, guests or even just my wife and I will consider a question about a region along the coast, or the controlling depths for a buddy that is considering a transit or some other question. It would be great to have a handy resource, rather than have to grab a computer. Actually, the old fashion concept of a coffee table book is a great conversation starter too.

So, which to you think would be best? Don't really need charts, as much as something that noted controlling depths and air drafts, inlets, abundance of anchorages, ports of interest along the way, etc.
 

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Isn't what you're describing any one of the printed ICW cruising guides? I often grab my On the Water Chartguides book for the ICW when something crosses my mind.
 

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Isn't what you're describing any one of the printed ICW cruising guides? I often grab my On the Water Chartguides book for the ICW when something crosses my mind.
Go Mark and Diana!

The Doyle Guides, the Waterway Guides, the Kettlewell Guides are all good coffee table fodder.
 

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We've done the ICW 4 times now and each time we used the Waterway Guides (in conjunction with Active Captain when we could). The Waterway Guides are great, though, in my opinion. Haven't tried any of the others mentioned above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yes, I'm familiar, I asking for individuals suggestions for the best purpose suited. The On the Water guide may be best. I like Waterway guides, but can't actually find one that covers the entire ICW.
 

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This isn't specific to the ICW, but just an idea to throw out there. When we went to the BVI, wherever we anchored/moored I put our lat/long, a description of the anchorage, and whatever restaurant we ate at on the corresponding guidebook page. That way, we'd have it when we return and when we aren't there, flipping through the book and seeing my notes brings back good memories. I plan on doing the same with my ICW guidebook. During the winter it's nice to look back as well as forward.
 
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Why? It's free and we all get to help each other. That's the beauty of crowdsourcing.
There have been issues with the owner here on this site and others, and I have to agree that I would rather there was another option. Unfortunately he is the only game in town for crowd sourced info.
 

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Dave, I know you like the guy- I find Mr. Siegel unnecessarily offensive and argumentative, and find the e-boat card system unnecessarily intrusive.* As far as the value of crowdsourcing goes, the input from one crowd has less value than the input from many, (for example,think you are going to get an unbiased opinion on android phones if you survey nothing but longtime iPhone users?) which is why i prefer to get input from a variety of fora rather than a single source despite Mr. Siegel's protestations that fora are inherently inaccurate due to the anonymity of the input. (yes i know I am stretching the definition of crowdsourcing) Quite simply, the larger the statistical sample, the more likely to get valuable results.

Sailnet is free, and we get to help each other as well.


* I know some find me unnecessarily offensive and argumentative, as well... I'm okay with that.
 

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bljones

what is intrusive about the eboatcards?

I don' think one has to join the eboatcards thing to use AC anyway, no?

What do you mean by 'one crowd?' anyone can input to AC?

and i'm not crazy about Siegel either, nevertheless I have found the products handy. Now you have me wondering…

(as per the below request, please PM me if you'd be so kind)
 

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Er, coffee table book, please. Perhaps the discussion about the merits of crowd sourcing could move to another thread. Worthy discussion as long as it's not about bashing anyone, but let's not derail the OPs thread.
 
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So, in a creepily interesting turn of events, Mr. Siegel decided to comment on my blog.
Dock Six Chronicles: A Last Look At Last Year- The Dinghy Diaries: A New Beginning
Wow, if my mere expression of opinion is enough to drive a noticeable spike intraffic to AC that is so huge that the grateful owner sought me out to congratulate me and offer me a partnership(!) then either
a) I have much more social media influence than I thought
b) Sailnet has more influence than I thought, or
c) Active captain is a much less, er...active, than it's founder would like us to believe.

Thanks for reinforcing my opinion, Jeff.
 

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Dave, I know you like the guy- I find Mr. Siegel unnecessarily offensive and argumentative, and find the e-boat card system unnecessarily intrusive.
I do like Jeff. I like Karen also, and she is more pleasant to look at. *grin* The dogs aren't bad either.

That doesn't mean I always agree with him. Without digressing too badly, I disagree with Jeff's perspective on paper charts. Out of date charts are out of date whether paper or electronic.

As far as the value of crowdsourcing goes, the input from one crowd has less value than the input from many
A crowd IS many. A crowd is a crowd. As long as the population is representative and statistically significant checking a different crowd has little value other than as a thesis topic. ActiveCaptain has done a great job of getting lots of people to contribute lots of information. Not all of it is great, but sorting it out is pretty fast.

Jeff's personality has nothing whatsoever to do with the tremendous contribution of ActiveCaptain to the cruising community. It's a brilliant concept that in its simple elegance has changed the complexion of sharing information.

Relevant to the thread topic, coffee table books and indeed cruising guides in general have the limitation of a single perspective. It may well be an experienced and educated perspective but still just one.

Mark and Diana Doyle, The Waterway Guides, Claiborne Young, and John Kettlewell among others provide a very real service to cruisers. My Kettlewell guide is long enough in the tooth (don't tell Jeff how out of date it is! *grin*) that I'll be replacing it this year, probably with something from the Doyles.

On the occasions when I do take the ICW I sit down each night to go through the next day's trek with one of the chart guides. I use ActiveCaptain and SSECN as planning supplement.

Underway I'm all electronic except for bridges - I find a published list of locations and times easier to use to calculate appropriate boat speed to reach bridges about five minutes before opening. My goal is to conserve both fuel and time.

For coffee table purposes, sitting in front of a fire on a cold day, I like the more chatty style of guides like those Claiborne Young writes or that Bill Shellenberger offers for the Chesapeake. On the other hand, sitting around with other cruisers I like the chart book style like the Doyle's On The Water Chart Guides and the Kettlewell Guides (reminiscent of AAA TripTiks). Running our fingers along the chart and sharing stories is great fun. Sometimes a picture or chart really is worth a thousand words.

Sailnet is free, and we get to help each other as well.
Agreed. There are many solutions to most problems and often multiple solutions are the best answer in the end.

If time is a factor as it often is for navigational issues a guide, a chart, or ActiveCaptain are the resources I will turn to. If I'm approaching an inlet like Port St Lucie I'll use Steve Dodge's Inlet Guide (another coffee table candidate), Active Captain on Charts & Tides, and likely a call to the local Towboat/US base. SailNet and other fora are more useful to me for less time sensitive issues.
 

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Jeff's personality has nothing whatsoever to do with the tremendous contribution of ActiveCaptain to the cruising community. It's a brilliant concept that in its simple elegance has changed the complexion of sharing information.
Ah.
Dave, I agree on the value of crowd sourcing, but what is the value of that input when the "owner" of the crowd has a habit of attacking anyone who disagrees with him? What does that do the the value of the input?
Further, if some can be banned from the crowd because of disagreements with the owner, as has happened in the past, then does that not skew the crowd, and make the data suspect?
I agree that AC could be a fantastic resource, with a different personality facilitating the crowd.
 

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it is a bit surprising that there are no true "coffee table" books about the ICW, at least that I'm aware of. Certainly no shortage of cruising guides, and there are many regional large format books about places like the Outer Banks or Low Country, but nothing that really focuses on the trip down the Ditch itself... The only 2 I know of are seriously outdated...

The first is SOUTH BY SOUTHEAST by Walter Cronkite, illustrated with the beautiful watercolors of Ray Ellis... this book will always have a special significance for me, having met Cronkite in Coinjock during my first-ever trip down the ICW...

South by Southeast: Walter Cronkite, Ray G. Ellis: 9780848705398: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@51dR9p7Sb0L

The second is probably the better of the two, a book done by National Geographic back in the 70's... It's quite nicely done, actually the entire Eastern Seaboard including New England is featured. Seriously outdated by now, but it still features the sort of photography for which Nat Geo has always been known, and gives a very nice feel for what it's like to head down the coast as a snowbird, and how the character of the coast changes from one region to the next. If anything, reading it today is seriously eye-opening in terms of showing how much has changed over the last 40 years - looking at the pic of a place like Bahia Mar in Lauderdale, for instance, it appears the largest yacht in there is somewhere between 50-60 feet... Nowadays, of course, one might see yachts in Port Everglades with tenders of that size :)

America's Inland Waterway: Exploring the Atlantic Seaboard: Jr., Allan C, photographed by James L. Amos Fisher, colour photos: 9780870441288: Amazon.com: [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51dGUtEl%[email protected]@[email protected]@51dGUtEl%2B3L
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

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While not about the ICW, there is a book that is great for having on that coffee table. It's called "To the Sea" by Tony Meisel. A book about the sagas of survival and tales of epic challenge on the seven seas. Plus the photos are great!
 
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