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Hurricanes are coming -

Hawaii braces as Iselle to give island first hurricane in 22 years

Hurricane Iselle was expected to arrive on the Big Island on Thursday evening, bringing heavy rains, winds gusting up to 85 mph and flooding in some areas. Weather officials changed their outlook on the system Wednesday after seeing it get a little stronger, giving it enough oomph to stay a hurricane as it reaches landfall.

"What ended up happening is the storm has resurged just enough to keep its hurricane strength," said Mike Cantin, a National Weather Service meteorologist.

Cantin said that means stronger winds of 60 to 70 mph, though rainfall estimates of 5 inches to 8 inches in a short time frame remained unchanged.

"Not a major hurricane, but definitely enough to blow things around," he said.

Iselle loomed about 400 miles east of Hilo early Thursday, with sustained winds of 85 mph and traveling about 18 mph.

Cantin said the Big Island's size and terrain would help break up the hurricane, weakening it into a tropical storm as it passes Maui and Oahu late Thursday and early Friday.

Hurricane Julio, meanwhile, swirled closely behind with maximum winds whipping at 105 mph. The National Hurricane Center said it expected the storm to strengthen even more Thursday before gradually weakening by Thursday night. That weakening is expected to continue into the weekend.

Hawaii has been directly hit by hurricanes only three times since 1950, though the region has had 147 tropical cyclones over that time. The last time Hawaii was hit with a tropical storm or hurricane was in 1992, when Hurricane Iniki killed six people and destroyed more than 1,400 homes in Kauai, said meteorologist Eric Lau.

The two hurricanes have disrupted tourism, prompted flash flood warnings and led to school closures. Gov. Neil Abercrombie, meanwhile, signed an emergency proclamation allowing officials to tap into a disaster fund set aside by the state Legislature.
 

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Dang! The way you started the thread, I thought zombies were coming to Hawaii . Good luck preparing for cane.
 

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islander bahama 24
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Get underway head south southwest a couple hundred and wait it out if you can boats are safer at sea than in a marina in a cane been there done that in the late 80's in the navy
 

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If they have boats in Hawaii, unless things have changed a great deal since I lived there, there aren't many places to store boats out of the water. There certainly aren't any places where anyone is set up for hurricane force wind tie downs on land, either. Storm surge should not be a big factor (anyway, everybody is used to tsunamis) so just securing the boat in the slip well is about all one can do.
The volcanoes on Hawaii will break down Iselle very quickly so that anywhere west of the big island will most likely not have more than lower end tropical storm force winds, which really shouldn't be all that bad and Julio will most likely pass north of the islands, giving surfers some pretty great waves.
No need to start a panic just yet.
 

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i would not haul out...better to ride it out, find a nice nook if time permits and lasso the hell out of it...

take off all superflous thing on deck, boom included dodgers etc...if it does reach you...

GOOD LUCK!
 
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Get underway head south southwest a couple hundred and wait it out if you can boats are safer at sea than in a marina in a cane been there done that in the late 80's in the navy
"boats are safer at sea"
Is not that is what the Capt of Bounty (lost in Atlantic) said?

I got my 34 tied up well, it is my neighboring boat I am worried about. I may throw some lines on her to keep her from bangining mine.

Hilo going to get hit bad, the rest probably not too bad unless the second cane turns towards Hawaii.

I tried to convince my family we were also safer at sea (including the dog, two cats, turtle, and gold fish), but they did not buy it. So the boat will stay at the dock. I have not even removed the sails or dodger.
 

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i would not haul out...better to ride it out, find a nice nook if time permits and lasso the hell out of it...

take off all superflous thing on deck, boom included dodgers etc...if it does reach you...

GOOD LUCK!
There are no nooks in Hawaii. The best nook is Pearl Harbor and you will get sunk by the Navy if you try to anchor in there. Safer to ride the cane out at your own mooring. Even pulling out could be bad as the winds may knock you over.
 

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If they have boats in Hawaii, unless things have changed a great deal since I lived there, there aren't many places to store boats out of the water. There certainly aren't any places where anyone is set up for hurricane force wind tie downs on land, either. Storm surge should not be a big factor (anyway, everybody is used to tsunamis) so just securing the boat in the slip well is about all one can do.
The volcanoes on Hawaii will break down Iselle very quickly so that anywhere west of the big island will most likely not have more than lower end tropical storm force winds, which really shouldn't be all that bad and Julio will most likely pass north of the islands, giving surfers some pretty great waves.
No need to start a panic just yet.
Last two Tsunamis I rode them out at sea, good thing as the Japan Tsunami took out half our floating dock. The waves will probably be junk for surfers- the fetch is only a couple hundred miles- not enough to clean up like the waves generated up near Alaska.
 

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All of Hawaii Public schools closed tomorrow (Friday) due to high probability of Sharknados. Kids are calling it a Sharknado Day as opposed to a Snow day you would have on the mainland.
 

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Get underway head south southwest a couple hundred and wait it out if you can boats are safer at sea than in a marina in a cane been there done that in the late 80's in the navy
I would think long and hard before suicide.

The first one is heading due west so if you sailed SSW you would be crossing its path. It may not be blowing 100 knots but its a very broad storm. And its too late to clear it now, anyway.
The second one is still too far out to see where its going, but looks like it will miss most of the islands.

Without knowing that area at all, nor having followed these storms progress, can I just say be very, very reticent at following the crazy advice that a 40 foot boat is safer at sea in front of a hurricane than watching it in port from a nice dry bar.


Mark
 

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My brother was going to come to the mainland (lives on Maui) but does not want to leave his house. He is high enough that he is not worried about storm surge. I know that a lot of the marinas there are not real well protected, not sure what I would do if I were there. Sure you can run south to avoid these two hurricanes, but who knows what might develop while out there and many folks have both land and water assets. I imagine there is not a lot of high yacht storage areas on the islands. I know here in New York most of the boats that were damaged by Sandy were the ones that were pulled out of the water. Lots of boats floated off there stands.
 

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My brother was going to come to the mainland (lives on Maui) but does not want to leave his house. He is high enough that he is not worried about storm surge. I know that a lot of the marinas there are not real well protected, not sure what I would do if I were there. Sure you can run south to avoid these two hurricanes, but who knows what might develop while out there and many folks have both land and water assets. I imagine there is not a lot of high yacht storage areas on the islands. I know here in New York most of the boats that were damaged by Sandy were the ones that were pulled out of the water. Lots of boats floated off there stands.
You do not want to leave harbor now unless you are an ocean going commercial vessel. Actually a few hours ago CG ordered all ocean going commecial vessels and barges out of harbors on Big Island and Maui to protect the harbors from damage.

I am thinking I should run down to boat and remove dodger, and furling jib. I am located north shore oahu. Weather forecast here is 50 knots for a few hours tomorrow AM.
 

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There are no nooks in Hawaii. The best nook is Pearl Harbor and you will get sunk by the Navy if you try to anchor in there. Safer to ride the cane out at your own mooring. Even pulling out could be bad as the winds may knock you over.

if no nooks then do your best to reduce windage and remove sails, even boom etc...the less resistance the better...

when in ft.lauderdale as a kid we went through 1 big hurricane, and a smaller one, and I clearly remember what the guys out there would do...:)

most importantly DO NOT HAUL OUT unless you can get one of those special in the dirt hurricane coffin type of space to settle down into.
 

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You do not want to leave harbor now unless you are an ocean going commercial vessel. Actually a few hours ago CG ordered all ocean going commecial vessels and barges out of harbors on Big Island and Maui to protect the harbors from damage.

I am thinking I should run down to boat and remove dodger, and furling jib. I am located north shore oahu. Weather forecast here is 50 knots for a few hours tomorrow AM.
YES anything that adds windage, remove it...including vents, cowlings anything...strap or chain down anything that potentially moves or can catch wind...

:)

good luck!
 

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You do not want to leave harbor now unless you are an ocean going commercial vessel. Actually a few hours ago CG ordered all ocean going commecial vessels and barges out of harbors on Big Island and Maui to protect the harbors from damage.

I am thinking I should run down to boat and remove dodger, and furling jib. I am located north shore oahu. Weather forecast here is 50 knots for a few hours tomorrow AM.
Yes, likely anything that can catch wind will be gone otherwise. We had a lot fo furled sails get ripped and winds by me were less than that. Around here the wind was not bad at all, but it was the storm surge that did damage. Seems like it has been less than 20 years since Hawaii has been hit, but hey time does seem to be going by faster as I get older!

Yea, no nooks to hide in. I keep thinking I want to go out there and live aboard. Some of the best sailing grounds, but not a lot of anchorages, and so few marinas.

Best of luck to you. Don't forget to double/triple/quadruple up on those docking lines!
 

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Isselle is forecast to brush the north shore of all islands moving west northwest and julio is forecast to follow similar track about 50 miles north of isselles track so south southwest would be away on a broad reach the fastest and one of the safest points of sail hurricane tracks taken from passage weather Sailing Weather - Marine Weather Forecasts for Sailors and Adventurers - PassageWeather zooming into north central pacific putting Hawaii in lower left corner of forecast model
 

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islander bahama 24
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"boats are safer at sea"
Is not that is what the Capt of Bounty (lost in Atlantic) said?
r.
If the bounty had been ready for sea then it would have likely been fine she had clogging issues with sawdust in pumps also still had unresolved rot issues also the captain didn't try to put seaway between him and the cane I'm talking sailing at basicly right angle to and away from general track also when they started having pump issues they should have issued a pan pan which would have mobilised and given them resources to save the aging vessel but was not to be.
 

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Isselle is forecast to brush the north shore of all islands moving west northwest

Maybe thats the problem with hurricanes.... no one knows where they are going to go. Or a dirty Harrold said "do you feel lucky?" It sure looks south to me.
 

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