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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
If I'm going to be honest with myself, she will live exclusively on the Chesapeake bay.
It's the shoal draft, standard rig configuration.
I've asked this question about a couple of others I was interested in and was told "not good for the Bay".

I'd also like to hear your impressions of this specific listing. What jumps out to you good or bad? I've noticed a few little things. None of which seem to be deal breakers for me. No AC or dodger.

Here's the link:

I'd love to get your impressions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Generally speaking, Bay sailing is exactly what Catalinas were designed for. Did your friends tell you why "not for the Bay"?
Ah... that's great to hear!
Does anything in the listing jump out at you, good or bad?
It was other boats I was looking at that where deemed unsuitable for Bay sailing, not this Catalina.
 

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Catalina 400 MKII
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Nice lookin boat. Might have to factor in the cost of replacing the standing rigging. Check the exhaust system. Could be the one. Catalina 36 is a nice boat. I like the walk through rear transom. Good Luck.
 

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Fist off, fair disclosure: I have owned, raced and cruised my C34 for twenty years. The C34 LOA actually measures 34.5, the C36 LOA is “only” 35.5, a foot longer. I only bring this up because the handling characteristics are very similar. My friend owns a 36 and I have sailed it to So Call and also mine up and down the Central coast. The two transoms are very similar to the extent of almost being the same and if anything, the C36 would be a tad larger. The ladder folds down and the center transom seat is removed for easy walk-through access. I am sure if the engine was remanufactured in 2019 that it would have a new exhaust elbow. Your photos show a very clean boat and I recognize many of the owner modifications and “upgrades” that you will find on the C34 and C36 owner’s websites. Every year C36s make the annual 1,000 NM migration to Cabo San Lucas so I’m quite sure this C36 can handle anything the Chessie can dish out.
Water Boat Watercraft Naval architecture Sky
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Fist off, fair disclosure: I have owned, raced and cruised my C34 for twenty years. The C34 LOA actually measures 34.5, the C36 LOA is “only” 35.5, a foot longer.
Yes, good point. Originally I was looking at the 34 MKII but my wife really likes the interior layout of the 36 MK 1.5 better. Now I do to.

Your photos show a very clean boat and I recognize many of the owner modifications and “upgrades” that you will find on the C34 and C36 owner’s websites.
What mods do you recognize?
 

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We see Catalina's all over the Chessy every year, along with every other variety to be fair. However as new (to us) owners of a Catalina, we've been nothing but impressed and happy with our choice to go with it. The Bay has plenty of shallow and deep water depending on where you sail. That looks like a great boat! When I clicked the link above, it only had a single pic (but admittedly I did not click around much to look).
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
We see Catalina's all over the Chessy every year, along with every other variety to be fair. However as new (to us) owners of a Catalina, we've been nothing but impressed and happy with our choice to go with it. The Bay has plenty of shallow and deep water depending on where you sail. That looks like a great boat! When I clicked the link above, it only had a single pic (but admittedly I did not click around much to look).
Thank you Glen for your input! This is the first one of the several I've posted and asked about that's gotten thumbs up for suitability on the Bay. I'm very happy. We're halfway through our 4 hour drive now to go inspect it.
Please have another look at the pics and let me know what you think. If you click on the main picture, it will bring up the many more.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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I almost dropped 40K on a Catalina 36 in Baltimore harbor. but the floorboards were screwed down, the engine wouldn't crank, the boat hadn't moved in 2 years, electric heaters were still on even though not making heat in the middle of summer, there was still a frying pan in the sink clearly it was a "let's get out of Dodge" type of situation by the owners. The broker rep claimed to be a friend of the owner kept trying to get me to buy it without a survey & sea trial called me a week later after told him I might go 29,500 I hope this is not the one you're looking at although it had the potential be a very beautiful boat. I did not buy it now I have a hunter 34 which I got for 26,500

nothing wrong with a standard rig. you'll be happy with it and you'll be motoring on the bay in midsummer anyhow when the winds die off, air conditioning would be the biggest advantage to have, unless you really really love hot hot humid stagnant weather.
So it's a buyer's market, don't be shy about going lowball.
 

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I doubled back and looked again. For whatever reason the first time it must've simply not loaded the web page correctly. This time I perused through all the pictures, I also read the entire listing. I have to say, that is an impressive amount of work done over the past year or so with many new devices added/upgraded. The pictures are not crisp enough to make out fine details but overall what I saw looked pretty nice. I would definitely say that day-sailing, overnights, week-long cruises on and around the Bay are all completely doable in this vessel easily. Its got a new huge 150 genoa on it which will give you a lot of sail area up there. There nothing at all problematic with having the standard rig, and it doesn't matter which type of keel unless your keeping it up in the northern Bay area, then the shoal is better.

Make sure you inspect chainplates, etc, etc and open up every cubby and access point you can find.
 

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...air conditioning would be the biggest advantage to have, unless you really really love hot hot humid stagnant weather.
Denise knows what she's talking about. The Chessie typically gets well into the 90s for extended periods, and the heat radiates through the coach roof into the cabin. A portable AC isn't enough to cool it. If you intend to spend time on it in it's slip, I'd negotiate with the seller for a price reduction to cover at least part of the cost of installing an onboard AC unit. He's selling a boat that lacks an onboard AC where one is needed. That's a negative against the market value of the boat that justifies negotiation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I almost dropped 40K on a Catalina 36 in Baltimore harbor. but the floorboards were screwed down, the engine wouldn't crank, the boat hadn't moved in 2 years, electric heaters were still on even though not making heat in the middle of summer, there was still a frying pan in the sink clearly it was a "let's get out of Dodge" type of situation by the owners. The broker rep claimed to be a friend of the owner kept trying to get me to buy it without a survey & sea trial called me a week later after told him I might go 29,500 I hope this is not the one you're looking at although it had the potential be a very beautiful boat. I did not buy it now I have a hunter 34 which I got for 26,500

nothing wrong with a standard rig. you'll be happy with it and you'll be motoring on the bay in midsummer anyhow when the winds die off, air conditioning would be the biggest advantage to have, unless you really really love hot hot humid stagnant weather.
So it's a buyer's market, don't be shy about going lowball.
This couldn't be the same one. It has signs of being used but not "rode hard and put away wet". Also, the broker has sold the boat to the last 3 owners. It's lived on Lake Michigan most of its life and has been in Oriental NC for the past 2 years. The broker basically insisted that we get a survey or he might not deal with us. Husband and wife team that displayed absolutely no pressure. Great people.

Standard rig... I've been informed by an acquaintance that has owned Catalinas and several others that the tall rig with a shoal draft keel might make me unhappy in the long run.

Buyers market?!! I've been under the working impression that the buying frenzy over the past year has solidly put the seller in the drivers seat. Am I wrong? We offered 20% below asking price. Owner has 24 hours to respond.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I doubled back and looked again. For whatever reason the first time it must've simply not loaded the web page correctly. This time I perused through all the pictures, I also read the entire listing. I have to say, that is an impressive amount of work done over the past year or so with many new devices added/upgraded. The pictures are not crisp enough to make out fine details but overall what I saw looked pretty nice. I would definitely say that day-sailing, overnights, week-long cruises on and around the Bay are all completely doable in this vessel easily. Its got a new huge 150 genoa on it which will give you a lot of sail area up there. There nothing at all problematic with having the standard rig, and it doesn't matter which type of keel unless your keeping it up in the northern Bay area, then the shoal is better.

Make sure you inspect chainplates, etc, etc and open up every cubby and access point you can find.
Thank you for that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Denise knows what she's talking about. The Chessie typically gets well into the 90s for extended periods, and the heat radiates through the coach roof into the cabin. A portable AC isn't enough to cool it. If you intend to spend time on it in it's slip, I'd negotiate with the seller for a price reduction to cover at least part of the cost of installing an onboard AC unit. He's selling a boat that lacks an onboard AC where one is needed. That's a negative against the market value of the boat that justifies negotiation.
We probably won't get to that the first season because my plan is to make my wife sweat it out until it's her idea to add it. "Yes dear, if you really think we should, I'll add AC for you because I love you." Ha ha.
 

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We offered 20% below asking price.
Good luck!! I hope you offered what your research suggests the boat is worth, or a tad less to allow for the owner to satisfy themselves they got you up a bit. A generic discount to asking isn't the way to go. You could piss off an owner that thought they offered her at a sell now price, or get ripped off, if offered at a test the very top of the market price.
 

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I'd negotiate with the seller for a price reduction to cover at least part of the cost of installing an onboard AC unit
One can certainly tell the seller their boat is missing something the buyer really wants, to establish bargaining position. That makes the seller realize they are starting a bit behind. However, no seller is going to underwrite your upgrade, unless most comparable boats have it, or it's being offered with the upgrade, which turn out doesn't work. I'm not sure how many 36 ft boats have built in air conditioning, as they rarely have room for a generator. Still, it's a pretty desirable upgrade for a Chessy summer.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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This couldn't be the same one. It has signs of being used but not "rode hard and put away wet". Also, the broker has sold the boat to the last 3 owners. It's lived on Lake Michigan most of its life and has been in Oriental NC for the past 2 years. The broker basically insisted that we get a survey or he might not deal with us. Husband and wife team that displayed absolutely no pressure. Great people.

Standard rig... I've been informed by an acquaintance that has owned Catalinas and several others that the tall rig with a shoal draft keel might make me unhappy in the long run.

Buyers market?!! I've been under the working impression that the buying frenzy over the past year has solidly put the seller in the drivers seat. Am I wrong? We offered 20% below asking price. Owner has 24 hours to respond.
I may be wrong on the buyer's market thing but it's my own perception, probably not true.

The thing about survey & sea trial, once you plop the money down for that, everybody assumes you're buying the boat, so be very sure before you make that decision. And it is contingent at the lowest price your offering and problems you've already discovered before the survey. I went on record saying I would walk if I was really unhappy. in the end I finally did buy the boat but I was prepared to walk if I couldn't get a straight answer on the bilge filling up. (Which is actually okay, I might add at this point in time)

You could have a real battle for a lower price than your offer with the price after survey especially if it's with a broker because every penny eats into their commission.
 

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A couple of things that stuck out when I casually looked at the photos and listing were 1) The owner did the mod to the galley table. This was from a Mainsheet article some years ago. The original table was designed to compress the table pedestal to convert it into a double berth. This “cocktail table” mod was to make easier access around the table. Ask if the owner has the original table top and cushion insert. 2) the 65-amp alternator is an upgrade and it’s supporting arm is a recommended upgrade. I would ask them if it is externally regulated. 3) the Max prop is an owner upgrade. 4) I see numerous changes to the lighting fixtures so I assume the owner has been upgrading to LED. From my casual observations, this looks like a well-maintained boat and I wish you good luck and a satisfactory conclusion to your negotiations. I am curious about the boat’s sail number and what the “Mk 1.5” means. I thought that the 36’s went straight to the “sugar scoop” stern. On the C34, the Mk 1.5 designation was where they merely notched the original transom. The “sugar scoop” happened later in the C34 production run.
 
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