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Fist off, fair disclosure: I have owned, raced and cruised my C34 for twenty years. The C34 LOA actually measures 34.5, the C36 LOA is “only” 35.5, a foot longer. I only bring this up because the handling characteristics are very similar. My friend owns a 36 and I have sailed it to So Call and also mine up and down the Central coast. The two transoms are very similar to the extent of almost being the same and if anything, the C36 would be a tad larger. The ladder folds down and the center transom seat is removed for easy walk-through access. I am sure if the engine was remanufactured in 2019 that it would have a new exhaust elbow. Your photos show a very clean boat and I recognize many of the owner modifications and “upgrades” that you will find on the C34 and C36 owner’s websites. Every year C36s make the annual 1,000 NM migration to Cabo San Lucas so I’m quite sure this C36 can handle anything the Chessie can dish out.
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A couple of things that stuck out when I casually looked at the photos and listing were 1) The owner did the mod to the galley table. This was from a Mainsheet article some years ago. The original table was designed to compress the table pedestal to convert it into a double berth. This “cocktail table” mod was to make easier access around the table. Ask if the owner has the original table top and cushion insert. 2) the 65-amp alternator is an upgrade and it’s supporting arm is a recommended upgrade. I would ask them if it is externally regulated. 3) the Max prop is an owner upgrade. 4) I see numerous changes to the lighting fixtures so I assume the owner has been upgrading to LED. From my casual observations, this looks like a well-maintained boat and I wish you good luck and a satisfactory conclusion to your negotiations. I am curious about the boat’s sail number and what the “Mk 1.5” means. I thought that the 36’s went straight to the “sugar scoop” stern. On the C34, the Mk 1.5 designation was where they merely notched the original transom. The “sugar scoop” happened later in the C34 production run.
 

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The galley table berth is super comfortable so it would be great to get that cushion and table top. I think your alternator is externally regulated because it is a 65 Amp and not the “standard” 45 Amp “Motorola” that came with that engine. Car type alternators have a series of diodes that step down the charge rate as they heat up. This results in going to “float” sooner and super long charging times. External regulators have “brains” that sense the charge going into the batteries allowing them to charge at the higher bulk rate longer. Prop pitch is a PITA. I need to look mine up to tell you what I have. Pitch it one way and you get better fuel economy but slower boat speed (at least in the C34). The other way you get a higher top end. Have the surveyor tell you the pitch of the current prop and what he recommends. The chart table light looked like a replacement to the original black plastic one. I assumed that the owner “modernized”.

I think the build history goes as follows. First, both boats had the standard, classic sterns. Gerry Douglas then put a “notch” in the C34 transom along with some “tweaks” to the deck mold. Later he did a much more extensive change to deck mold, “sugar scooping” it. Below the waterline the mold is the same. Above the waterline is a much bigger flair allowing for the “scoop” as well as opening up the cockpit. He also did some major tweaks to the interior molds. The result was the Mark II. People with the original notched transoms started to nickname themselves as “Mk1.5”. Does the stern of your boat look like mine? Your interior photograph shows an accordion door to the aft stateroom whereas mine has a solid door.
 
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