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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Dear Folks,

I recently retired to Hawaii. Though I owned many powerboats over the years, I had not sailed since learning on C-Larks in the 1970's.

In the last seven months, I have taken two sailing classes at UH Manoa. Certified in Cal 20, and spent sometime on a J-24.

I have been volunteering with the Sea Scouts, helping the kids learn to sail FJ's and Lasers.

I am looking for a boat to go day sailing on the Leeward side of Oahu, fair weather and calm seas only. As I gain experience and confidence, I may venture to go inter island cruising.

I have ~$10K to spend on a boat. I need it to be easy to single hand, or with complete novices to help.

I have a good local sailor to do a quick and dirty inspection. I have a good local surveyor.

Any advice on your first sailboat, and what you learned would be appreciated.

Aloha,
Bruce
 

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You know more about boats and sailing than I do.
I can only repeat what I have read in my attempt to prepare for a purchase and a long voyage. 10 K for the purchase and another 10 K for the refit, then you can take your life in your hands and hope you did everything right.
Do not forget I am paranoid and know little or nothing about sailboats.
 

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Bruce,

Honestly I can think of a lot of boats that may fit your needs, but living in Hawaii I think you are really stuck with what you can find locally. I just don't see any way to buy a boat and ship it down economically. Check the yacht clubs and sailing schools, and see what you can find on the island, because while I can think of a lot of great $10,000 boats, the number of great boats that could be bought and shipped down for $10,000 includes almost nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the input.

I agree, there's no practical way to buy a boat on the mainland and ship it, so it is local boats only.

I have looked at the Cascade...the price seems right, but the boat looks like it was "rode hard and put away wet"...no pride of ownership. My local inspection guy gave it a "NO PASS".

I will look at the Rhodes this week.

I REALLY like the looks of the Hunter 27. Are there any inherent/known problems with them?

What are the advantages/disadvantages of tiller steering over a wheel system?

TIA,
Bruce
 

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Good morning all,

I'm going to view a 1974 Ranger 28 later this week.
What's the word on Rangers of that era?

Aloha,
Bruce
The Ranger 28 is a nice boat, but it's a racer/cruiser with the emphasis (design wise) on racing. Quite a decent interior though.

Anyhow, it's one of those 70s IOR influenced designs that tend to be a handful dead downwind under spinnaker. However with careful course and sail selection it should be a good cruising boat too. My brother owned one back in the 80s and I spent a lot of time on it at the time.

Her cruising 'sister', the R29 from the same designer (Gary Mull) is a nicer cruising boat with a similar layout but somewhat more sedate in behaviour. Our son and his family had an R 29 as their first boat and quite liked it. Being racers at heart, however, they've moved on.

Back to the 28, she's a pretty boat, fairly well built though the frameless hull always gave me pause. Headroom is maximized by keeping the inside of the hull as the cabin 'sole'.. no stringers/floors/ etc but there is a shallow keel sump. The hull has a strong 'tumblehome' to it which works well with the design and is another throwback to a perceived advantage under the 'rule' of the day.

The icebox is under a companionway step, poorly insulated and close to the engine so that's a bit of a major downer for cruising, not so much for daysailing. It's a boat that will be fun to sail, decent cockpit and well set up for weekending other than the icebox.

Many were sold with Atomic 4s.. some converted to diesels, still others downgraded to outboards over the years.

One more thing.. as a 74 it may not have a balanced rudder - that was a later mod. This makes her somewhat heavy-helmed in a breeze.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, Ron, for the information.

I could care less about racing.

I want to go day sailing on the Leeward side of Oahu. Speed is tertiary...Ease of handling is primary, comfortable ride for my passengers next in importance.

I appreciate your response.

Aloha,
Bruce
 

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The R 28 won't be too difficult to short/singlehand, cockpit is well proportioned and most everything is close to hand (depending, of course, on how the boat is rigged at present.

The 'skinny main/big genoa' rig proportions makes her very headsail critical, but if it's just daysailing around in the lee of an island you'll soon find the headsail that works best for you in general.. a #3 jib (~100%) is a good bet if you're in the trades. Easy tacking and less backwinding of the main.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks, Ron.
In your opinion is roller furling worth the extra money and maintenance?
I am old (62) and fat. The fewer trips on a pitching foredeck, the better.
Aloha,
Bruce
 

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would it be a bad idea to tow a 25' aluminum tug boat by sail to Hawaii. It will cost $10,000 to ship it on Matson. Just wanting some input. Seems to me to could be done with the right kind of very long shock absorbing tow line, but I know very little about what would to be expected under that kind of load. The boat weight is 10,000 pounds.
 

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would it be a bad idea to tow a 25' aluminum tug boat by sail to Hawaii. It will cost $10,000 to ship it on Matson. Just wanting some input. Seems to me to could be done with the right kind of very long shock absorbing tow line, but I know very little about what would to be expected under that kind of load. The boat weight is 10,000 pounds.
In case this is serious...
It's a non-starter on so many levels... Unless maybe if you're gonna use the Mirabella V as the tow boat....
 

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Ok, I'll bite, why would an aluminum tug boat be towed by a sailboat? Maybe I missed the question or understood improperly... I know 25' and aluminum... but hell if a San Jaun 24 can make it to Hawaii (well, you know, sort of) Rimas Adrift | Sailing Fortuitous

I kid.. I really do.
 

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You will need a very large sailboat to tow a 10,000 lbs tug to Hawaii. And if the weather gets rough, you will have to separate and the tug has to go under it's own power. The loads on tow line during a storm would be too dangerous for both vessels.
 
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