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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So I'm strongly considering the idea of living aboard. As it is right now I live in a 450 sq ft log cabin with no cable and no internet (I'm posting from work) and thats too much space for me. I grew up on the water and like small living quarters so I figure it would be a good fit. I would like to know what I'm getting into... Any advice would be great. To be more to the point, I am most concerned about cost of living and maintenance. I thinking between 30'-35'.


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You might find 150sq.ft. a wee bit tight if you're thinking 30-35 ft. Just remember if you don't like the current backyard. With a boat you can always obtain a new one by just moving........i2f
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
...

Ya, my buddy has a 30' and i liked the size. I do have a four year old son and I'm wondering what kind of stress that would put on him. I live in the northwest and our winters are rainy and unpleasant.
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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Where are you planning on doing this. Living aboard would be easier in some parts of the country over others. Finding a marina that allows live aboards can be a problem in some areas too. There are blogs out there of folks currently livingaboard and you can learn quite a bit from their experiences.
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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In the PNW, a poorly insulated boat is going to cause you condensation problems in the winter time. The previous owner of our boat lived on board down at Shilshoal for 13 years. It has insulated hulls and a good heat source that improved the quality of life considerably.
 

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The child will be fine if you can work out a system where he can burn off energy, and not keep him cooped up. Might bring in a whole new structure to your relationship. You won't be the first to raise a child in small quarters. BEST WISHES in working things out in your favor......i2f
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Ya, I have been reading some studies about children raised on boats with some impressive results for sure. One of my other concerns is the maintenance of the vessel. I have read so many different points of view that my head is spinning. I understand that certain boats can be less resilient the forces of nature, but it would be nice to have a ballpark idea of the boats needs. Is there anything to steer clear of for a new boater? Also any suggestions of a boat which might suit my needs?

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Ya, I have been reading some studies about children raised on boats with some impressive results for sure. One of my other concerns is the maintenance of the vessel. I have read so many different points of view that my head is spinning. I understand that certain boats can be less resilient the forces of nature, but it would be nice to have a ballpark idea of the boats needs. Is there anything to steer clear of for a new boater? Also any suggestions of a boat which might suit my needs?

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Go to the Boat Buying Forum and start a thread there about what you want. List as many details as possible, including where you live, your personal circumstances, money, the child, etc. You shuold get a lot of repies.

- CD
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
ya i will. In all honesty the boat will making short journeys into the pudget sound and providing a place to live. pretty simple.
 

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In that case you only need a less expensive boat, and not a world cruiser, blue water boat. That really simplifies things for you. There are older Coronados, Columbias, Cals, Catalinas, and the list is quite huge. Lots of bang for the bucks with nice living space........i2f
 
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